Nu ook in het Nederlands.
 

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Acquia: Michael Schmid – Drupal 8 means better business

Planet Drupal - 11 hours 34 min ago

Michael Schmid, CTO of Amazee Labs, and I got the chance to talk in front of my camera during the Drupal Developer Days in Szeged, Hungary. As the technical lead of a successful and growing Drupal shop, I was keen to get his perspectives on how the technology of Drupal helps him do business and how Drupal 8 might help him and his clients even more than ever before.

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Chapter Three: Reviewing Code with PHPStorm

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/07/31 - 11:58pm

One of the main responsibilities of a Drupal core committer is doing a final review of patches before committing them. Since July 1, 2014, I’ve committed over 250 patches to Drupal 8. Thanks to Chapter Three for making that possible.



Reviewing code is time consuming. Here are some things that make my job easier:

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Phase2: Introducing OpenPublic’s App Strategy – Re-imagining Content Management For Public Sector

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/07/31 - 9:39pm

Since it was first developed, OpenPublic has redefined open source public sector content management. Packaging government-focused functionality into a secure Drupal distribution, once a radical notion, is now an established open source web solution. As the foundation of many of Phase2’s public sector site builds,

OpenPublic has demonstrated the importance of solutions that are replicable, that can prevent duplication of services, and provide examples of repeatable best practices. OpenPublic serves as accelerator for building good government web sites and it contains best practices and features around mobility, security and accessibility.

With the release of OpenPublic candidate 1, we’re simplifying  content management in the enterprise public sector space by appifying all functionality and content types in OpenPublic. What was once a wilderness of modules and configuration will be encapsulated in a clean collection of Apps, making all OpenPublic’s out-of-the-box functionality simple to configure by non-technical site administrators. This new App strategy will make it easier and cheaper for governments to implement the web functionality they need.

So, what is an App?

It can be confusing to pin down definitions for terms like: modules, features, distributions, and Apps. An App is simply a collection of code (modules, features or themes) that delivers a distinct piece of functionality upon installation. Like the “apps” on your smartphone or tablet, Drupal Apps provide functionality for a specific purpose – quickly, easily, and independently.

In 2011, Jeff Walpole introduced the concept of Apps for Drupal distributions and the new Apps module. Apps improve usability for site administrators, particularly as compared to the traditional Drupal Configuration dashboard. From the beginning, Apps added extensibility and interoperability to Drupal. Now, instead of adding Apps for extensibility, we’re appifying all distribution functionality for OpenPublic 1.0, finally giving the content administrators full configuration control.

Appification of OpenPublic For State and Local Government One Code Base, Many Departments

OpenPublic  Apps provide city, county, and state government agencies the ability to turn on and off independent pieces of functionality without affecting any other functionality on their platform. Many public sector agencies require a unified CMS spanning all departments and agencies. OpenPublic provides this through standard Apps developed for government needs, including directory management, stringent security, and editorial workflow. However, the flexibility of OpenPublic 1.0’s Apps also allows for specific functionality by department. This means that trying out new functionality is as easy as turning an App on or off, giving governments the opportunity to test innovative approaches without heavy risk or cost of implementation. See how San Mateo County uses OpenPublic Apps.

Simplified Configuration

Apps take Drupal development out of the equation, empowering site administrators to skip technical development when configuring individual department sites. Each App is self contained, so changing the configuration does not cause problems with other site features.

 Custom Functionality Made Easy

With OpenPublic, users can develop Apps specific to their objectives. San Mateo County, Calif., for instance, used OpenPublic to develop an App which adds custom location mapping to any page on the web platform. Once created, the San mateo County team was able test their new App in one department, then enable it for other departments when it was deemed successful. The sky’s the limit with OpenPublic’s new App structure with unique and flexible functionality for public sector platforms.

OpenPublic  is breaking new ground in web experience for public sector site administrators and visitors alike. With the Appification of all functionality in OpenPublic, we are knocking down traditional barriers to Drupal site maintenance and scalability with intuitive configuration. Stop by Experience Director Shawn Mole’s Capital Camp session with Greg Wilson, Director of Public Sector Practice, to learn more about how OpenPublic  is truly the next generation of open source government sites.

 

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Mediacurrent: Securing your Data in Drupal

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/07/31 - 9:09pm

As data breaches are on the rise, protecting sensitive data is more important than ever - for you and your customers.  Recently, our partner Townsend Security's Luke Probasco shared some best practices with our team for securing data in Drupal, meeting compliance regulations requiring encryption, and the importance of encryption key management.

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Drupal core announcements: Migrate module automated test failures - policy change

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/07/31 - 5:23pm

The Drupal 8 committers have slightly changed the policy regarding automated test failures as we move toward release of 8.0.0. The traditional policy is that any proposed core patch must pass all automated tests at commit time. We are amending that slightly such that patches which solve Criticals, but fail tests in a non-essential component, are allowed to proceed. For now, the only non-essential component is the Migrate framework. As announced previously, the Migrate framework is not release blocking for 8.0.0 so it should not hold back these Critical patches.

When we do have a patch which is Critical but cannot easily be adjusted to pass Migrate's unit tests, we will

  1. File a postponed Major followup issue tagged 'Failing Migrate test'. Describe the test that was disabled and the challenge in making it pass. The issue should link to this post so that folks understand why the test was disabled.
  2. In your patch for the Critical issue, change the name of the failing test method from testFooBar() to failingTestFooBar() and add a @todo to its docblock referencing your follow up issue.
  3. If we ever get Add "expected fail" functionality to simpletest (help wanted!), we will use that to skip tests instead of changing the method name.

Before release, we will revisit all issues tagged with 'Failing Migrate test' and make a determination about Migrate's suitability for 8.0.0. If deemed unsuitable, Migrate (or a specific migration path) can be added back into 8.1.0 or later.

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Drupal core announcements: Drupal 8.x is now 8.0.x - new branch

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/07/31 - 5:02pm

You may have noticed that as of a few days ago that there is a new branch in the Git source code repository for Drupal Core: 8.0.x!

This branch introduces "Semantic Versioning" for Drupal 8, which will allow us to have an 8.0.x release line, followed by an 8.1.x release line, and possibly more along the same lines. Unlike the drastic API and architecture changes that would accompany a 7.x -> 8.x or 8.x -> 9.x major release update, and correspondingly long timelines, the changes between 8.0.x and 8.1.x are expected to be more incremental (adding features and minor API refinements). Also, the time between 8.0.x and 8.1.x is expected to be correspondingly shorter. This change in philosophy will take some of the pressure off developers to make sure absolutely everything they want gets into the 8.0.x release, because new features can be added in the 8.1.x line.

Practical implications:

  • All of the existing 8.x issues in the Drupal Core issue queue have been moved to the 8.0.x branch.
  • Some issues may be pushed off to 8.1.x or 9.x by the branch maintainers: 8.1.x for more incremental changes, and 9.x for more drastic changes; in both cases, for issues that will not make it into 8.0.0.
  • Do not file any more 8.x branch issues.
  • Switch your local git repositories to use the 8.0.x branch.
  • The 8.x branch will be emptied and deleted sometime soon, probably after the next Alpha release, which is currently scheduled for August 6th (see https://groups.drupal.org/node/435848)
  • There is also an 8.1.x branch and a 9.x branch. These exist only for purposes of marking issues as "future material". Commits to Drupal 8 Core will be made on the 8.0.x branch only, at least for the time being. We'll make another announcement when it's time to actually start working on the 8.1.x branch.

For background information, you can read all the discussion on this issue: https://www.drupal.org/node/2135189

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Phase2: Static Drupal – Taking the pain out of Drupal hosting

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/07/31 - 3:10pm
Think back with me to the days of static websites. Those were easy! You just threw some html up on a server and that was it. No performance issues, no security issues, no worries about redundant failover if something goes wrong. No getting woken up in the middle of the night because something did happen. It was simple, fast and hard to break.

All that changed with more Dynamic websites like Drupal. We get a lot for using Drupal. We get a first class CMS, huge ecosystem of modules and the ability to change content live on the server. But we also get a lot of headaches along with it. We have to design a server system that can handle the load, be constantly monitoring it for failures, apply security updates and be vigilant of security breaches and be ready to be woken up when something doesn’t work.

We recently were challenged to find a way to use the power of Drupal as a CMS but serve the site as generated static pages. It was an interesting idea and we decided to see if we could make it work. We started out by building a proof of concept module that would take a Drupal site and render it as plain HTML pages with all the associated assets such as JS, CSS and images. This turned out not to be too hard once we used a little apache rewrite rule to fix url paths. We decided to call this module the Static module. It is available on Drupal.org (http://www.drupal.org/project/static)

By itself this module turns out to be really useful for two use cases. Static websites There is a class of website that is built in Drupal but is rarely if ever updated. There are no “community” bits to it like comments and webforms. For this type of website, you can use the static module to periodically export your entire Drupal site to static html that can be uploaded to a simple server without PHP, MySQL, memcache or anything other than a web server. If changes need to be made, they can be made on a laptop or staging server and then exported and uploaded again. This allows both viewing the full site for acceptance testing before it goes live and all of the performance and security gains of a static website. Archive websites A similar type of website is an archival site such as the various DrupalCon and DrupalCamp websites. While they no longer need to be live Drupal sites or be updated, they should still be accessible to see the content that was there. In the same way as simple Static websites, archived websites can be generated, uploaded and then left alone. Static websites are great and all but we can actually take it one step further. Turns out this module is also even better for building Hybrid websites. Hybrid websites A hybrid website is the primary reason we created the static module. We wanted a system where Drupal was installed behind a firewall and a static site was periodically generated and copied over to a public web server. This would allow content writers to create, update and delete content within Drupal which would track what is changing and within a short period of time it would be generated and transferred to the public facing site. Essentially it would have the power of content editing in Drupal but be hosted to the public as static HTML. We got this system working and I’m going to share more about it at my talk during CapitalCamp/Drupal4Gov. Be sure to check it out if you are coming.
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ThinkShout: Responsive Images in Drupal with the Picture Module

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/07/31 - 3:00pm

In today’s web device climate, you never know if your site will be viewed on a laptop, a tablet, a phone, an 84-inch 4k monitor, a Blu-ray player, a gaming console, or a refrigerator. Most of us have probably experienced the frustration of using a website that displayed poorly because of its inbuilt assumptions about what the user’s screen would look like. The ability for your web content to adjust to its context---in particular, screen resolution---is critical to making sure you deliver the best web experience possible to every user.

The tools and techniques to do so are known as responsive web design (RWD). One of the first high-profile sites to implement RWD was The Boston Globe, which is a great example to take a look at. RWD in general is beyond the scope of this blog post. Today, we’ll focus on a specific bit of RWD that is a little tricky to handle in Drupal: responsive images.

If you just did what I first did and typed drupal.org/project/responsive_images into your browser to see what popped up, you’ll see a module that is no longer actively maintained. Many responsive image projects have come and gone over the last few years, with varying approaches and degrees of success; it’s a crowded space.

Luckily, Drupal 8 will feature a responsive image handling solution in core with the new Picture module, and it has already been backported to Drupal 7. It’s a bit tricky to set up with configurations spread across several different GUI menus, but once you have it running, it’s a fast, smooth solution to an important challenge, and it plays well with its neighbors.

The Gist Of It

We'll be dealing with a handful of new objects to get responsive image behaviors going smoothly.

  • Breakpoints
    • Breakpoints are ranges of screen sizes, described by conditional tests (i.e., minimum width = 640)
  • Breakpoint Groups
    • EWISOTT (Exactly What It Says On The Tin)
  • Image Styles
    • You may already know these from the Media module; they let you bundle dimensions, scaling modes, etc. into styles that can be reused across your site.
  • Picture Mappings
    • Picture mappings pair up breakpoints with image styles

Once an image is associated with a responsive style, the Picture module will check the page dimensions, look at the breakpoint group, find the first breakpoint that applies to those dimensions (we'll come back to this point...), look at the picture mapping to find the associated image style, and apply that style to the image. This happens in real time, so a user resizing their window should see the image rescale to fit their new window size instantaneously.

Installation

We'll use Drush, a Drupal cli, to install the modules and their dependencies, and to enable them.

Picture has two important dependencies:

  • The Breakpoints module, which will keep its eye on the browser window size
  • The Chaos Tool Suite, which gives us lots of handy development tools and APIs

Drush will handle the dependencies for you; just navigate to your site root and type:

drush en picture -y

We'll also want the Media module:

drush en media -y

(In the above commands, -y just tells drush to assume "yes" for any requests for confirmation.)

Setting Up Breakpoints

Breakpoints can be found under Configuration > Media > Breakpoints. Each breakpoint needs a name and a media query. Optionally, you can enable Retina display handling for each breakpoint.

Note that the smallest breakpoint is set to a 0px minimum. This ensures that arbitrarily small screen sizes will be accommodated.

Ordering

The order in which the breakpoints appear is the order your breakpoint group will check their media queries. The example configuration uses minimums in decreasing order, which is preferable for responsive image design. If a breakpoint query fails (if the screen width is below the minimum), the next breakpoint down the line will be checked. Make sure you get this order right; once you pull these breakpoints into a group, their order cannot be edited; you'd need to delete the breakpoints and their group and start over.

Groups

Click 'Add a new group' to define a Breakpoint Group. The ordering on this screen will match the order defined by weights in the previous step.

Note that once a breakpoint has been added to a group, it cannot be edited.

Responsive Styles

This is an optional step provided by the Breakpoints module; it's essentially a wizard which makes copies of a preexisting image style, one for each selected breakpoint. If you have some image style effects you want to apply everywhere (desaturate, perhaps?), this can be a handy time saver. For general use, it's not really necessary.

Image Styles and Picture Mappings

Set up an image style for each breakpoint under Configuration > Media > Image Styles. For general use, these can be equal to or slightly less than the minimums of the associated breakpoints; for more complex layouts, id est columns, these might instead be set to match the behavior of the column widths.

Picture Mappings are found under Configuration > Media > Picture Mappings. First, associate the new Picture Mapping with our Breakpoint Group.

Now that the Picture Mapping has a Breakpoint Group, each breakpoint can be associated with an image style. Populate these with the image styles defined previously, and hit Finish.

File Type Display

Under Configuration > Media > File Types, select Images -> Manage File Display. Enable the Picture display mode, and select the Example Group.

Content Type

Now we're ready to create a node type with a responsive image field.

Make a content type and add a File field with the Media File Selector widget. Make sure that the field permits the image format file extensions you plan to use; by default it only allows *.txt.

Under Manage Display, make sure that the responsive image field is set to the Rendered File display formatter, which will connect the field to the file display mode we set earlier.

The End Product

We're done! Create a node with the example content type, add an image, and start dragging the corner of your window around. The image should resize as the window width passes between breakpoints.

The Benefits

There are several advantages to responsive web design, some of which are particular to image loading.

  • Controlled, consistent user experience across devices
    • Without clear knowledge of how our sites will be viewed, we cannot effectively design them to meet user needs.
  • Ease of navigation
    • Never let important elements render offscreen.
  • Bandwidth conservation
    • Don't send a 4k image to a QVGA-screen phone that doesn't need it.
  • Code it once
    • No need to build a secondary mobile site.
  • SEO optimization
    • Every node has one canonical URL, so Google won't split its results between mobile and desktop versions (which could easily drop your site to the dreaded second page of search results)!
  • Shareability
    • A bad example: Wikipedia. Take a look at how different its mobile version looks. If a mobile user posts an interesting article to Twitter, for example, both desktop and mobile users following the link will be hit with the mobile version, regardless of their device. With a single-URL responsive design, this is a nonissue.
Resources
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Pixelite: How to create a dashboard with Dashing and integrate with Drupal data

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/07/31 - 1:27pm
Facebook Like Google Plus One Linkedin Share Button What is Dashing

Dashing is a Sinatra (think ruby but not rails) based framework that lets you build dashboards. It was originally made by the guys at Shopify for displaying custom dashboards on TVs around the office.

Why use Dashing

Dashing makes your life easier, freeing you up to focus on more inportant things - like what data you are looking to display, and what time of widget you want to use.

Features of dashing:

  • Opensource (MIT license)
  • Widgets are tiny and encapsulated, made with SASS, HTML and coffeescript
  • The dashboard itself is simply HTML and SASS, meaning you can theme and style it to suit your needs
  • Comes bundled with several powerful widgets
  • Widgets are powered by simply data bindings (powered by batman.js)
  • Push and pull methods available to each widget
  • Pull jobs can be configured to run in the background on a set interval (e.g. every 30 seconds, poll Chartbeat for new data)
  • Layout is drag & drop interface for re-arranging widgets
Why not make a dashboard in Drupal

There are several dashboard modules in Drupal, and yes you can go to a bit lot of trouble and re-create the power of Dashing in Drupal, but there is no need.

Dashing is great at what it does, and it only does one thing.

Another advantage is that you can query other sources of data - e.g. Google Analytics or MailChimp and display metrics from those applications on your dashboard.

A really great example (including code) and can found over at http://derekweitzel.blogspot.co.nz/2014/03/a-hcc-dashboard-with-osg-accounting.html

Installation of Dashing on Ubuntu 14.04

The only real requirement is ruby 1.9+ (this comes by default in Ubunty 14.04, in Ubuntu 12.04 you need to install ruby-1.9 explicitly)

sudo apt-get install ruby ruby-dev nodejs g++ bundler sudo gem install dashing

you can create a new dashboard with

dashing new awesome_dashboard cd awesome_dashboard bundle

You start the application by

sudo dashing start

You now have a dashboard on http://localhost:3030 ready to go

Creating a new Dashing widget

There are already a few tutorials online, the best of which is probably just the existing suite of widgets available.

Here we will go through a simple example where we want to graph the of pieces of content in the "Needs review" state (provided by Workbench moderation) in Drupal. This serves as a mini-todo list for content authors, as ideally this number should be as low as possible.

In this example, we are re-cycling the "List" widget.

Place an instance of the "List" widget on a dashboard - e.g. sample.erb

<li data-row="1" data-col="1" data-sizex="1" data-sizey="1"> <div data-id="newsarticlesreview" data-view="List" data-unordered="true" data-title="News articles in 'Needs review'"></div> <i class="icon-check-sign icon-background"></i> </li>

Create a new job to poll for data

Create a new file in jobs/newsarticlesreview.rb, and place:

#!/bin/env ruby # encoding: utf-8 require 'net/http' require 'uri' require 'json' # TODO replace with a real production host server = "https://localhost" SCHEDULER.every '30s', :first_in => 0 do |job| url = URI.parse("#{server}/api/content/dashboard?token=FawTP0fJgSagS1aYcM2a5Bx-MaJI8Y975NwYWP12B0E") http = Net::HTTP.new(url.host, url.port) http.use_ssl = (url.scheme == 'https') http.verify_mode = OpenSSL::SSL::VERIFY_NONE response = http.request(Net::HTTP::Get.new(url.request_uri)) # Convert to JSON j = JSON[response.body] # Send the joke to the text widget review_content = {} review_content['en'] = { label: 'English', value: j['en']['news_article']['needs_review'] } review_content['mi'] = { label: 'Māori', value: j['mi']['news_article']['needs_review'] } send_event("newsarticlesreview", { items: review_content.values }) end Create a Drupal data source

Now we need to feed the Dashing request with a Drupal API. I have chosen to do all of these custom, as they are straight forward. In theory you could also craft these with the services module as well.

Create hook_menu() entry

/** * Implements hook_menu(). */ function CUSTOM_menu() { // Dashboard API requests. Protected using a token. // e.g. api/content/dashboard?token=FawTP0fJgSagS1aYcM2a5Bx-MaJI8Y975NwYWP12B0E $items['api/content/dashboard'] = array( 'title' => 'Content types broken down by workflow status', 'page callback' => 'CUSTOM_content_dashboard', 'access callback' => 'CUSTOM_dashboard_api_access', 'access arguments' => array('api/content/dashboard'), 'type' => MENU_CALLBACK, 'file' => 'CUSTOM.dashboard.inc', ); return $items; }

Here we define a custom route, and declare the access callback. The access callback is special as it needs to ensure that access is restricted to only requests with a special token. The token being created from a hash of the Drupal salt combined with the current path and private key, and base64 encoded (much like drupal_get_token() without the session ID check).

/** * Access callback to the dashboard API endpoints. These are protected by a * token. * * @param String $path * The path that is being requested. * * @return Boolean * Whether or not the use has access to the callback. */ function CUSTOM_dashboard_api_access($path) { global $is_https; // HTTPS only. $only_allow_https = (bool) variable_get('api_https_only', 1); if ($only_allow_https && !$is_https) { return FALSE; } // Only allow get requests. if ($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] !== 'GET') { return FALSE; } // Check token is correct. $params = drupal_get_query_parameters(); if (!isset($params['token']) || empty($params['token'])) { return FALSE; } $valid_token = CUSTOM_token_validation($path); if ($params['token'] !== $valid_token) { return FALSE; } return TRUE; }

And finally the data for the callback.

/** * Gathers current content statistics from Drupal, including the amount of * content broken down by a) content type, b) workflow state, c) status. * * @return JSON */ function CUSTOM_content_dashboard() { $output = array(); $languages = language_list('enabled'); $types = node_type_get_types(); // Workbench states. foreach ($languages[1] as $langcode => $language) { foreach ($types as $machine_name => $type) { // Workbench moderation in use (remove this if you do not have the module). if (workbench_moderation_node_type_moderated($machine_name)) { $results = db_query("SELECT COUNT(n.vid) AS total, w.state FROM {node} n JOIN {workbench_moderation_node_history} w ON w.vid = n.vid WHERE n.type = :type AND n.language = :lang AND w.current = 1 GROUP BY w.state", array(':type' => $machine_name, ':lang' => $langcode))->fetchAllAssoc('state'); foreach ($results as $state => $result) { $output[$langcode][$machine_name][$state] = (int) $result->total; } } // No workbench moderation for this content type, use the status column. else { $results = db_query("SELECT COUNT(n.nid) AS total, n.status FROM {node} n WHERE n.type = :type AND n.language = :lang GROUP BY n.status", array(':type' => $machine_name, ':lang' => $langcode))->fetchAllAssoc('status'); foreach ($results as $status => $result) { if ($status == NODE_PUBLISHED) { $status = 'published'; } else { $status = 'unpublished'; } $output[$langcode][$machine_name][$status] = (int) $result->total; } } } } drupal_json_output($output); drupal_exit(); }

And there you have it. Note the above code relies on workbench moderation being present, if you do not have it, simply remove the section of the code that is relevant. Note that the API response is considerably more complex and complete than the example calls for, but this just means you can display more data in more ways on your dashboard.

Here is the finished product:

Extra for experts

Create a init.d script for dashing, here is a good starter.

Comments

Let me know if you have completed (or started) a recent project to visual data from Drupal (or related third party applications) and your experiences there. Pictures are always welcome.

Tags drupal dashing dashboards data visualisation drupalplanet Source Dashing Category Tutorial
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PreviousNext: Using Vagrant: A Drupal Themer's Perspective

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/07/31 - 9:02am

On any project, whether you’re a themer, site builder or developer you will need a local development environment to work in. Even if everyone on a project works on the same OS, chances are people will have different versions of Apache MySQL and PHP, different server configuration and not to mention that the local environment will differ from staging and production environments.

This is where Vagrant can help. Vagrant is an open source setup and configuration tool for virtual machines such as VirtualBox or VMWare (and now with Docker support).

In this post, I give a quick overview of how Vagrant and VM's can improve your developer workflow and consistency.

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Matthew Saunders: Anatomy of a Drupalcamp - The Tools

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/07/31 - 3:20am

I've been involved with Drupalcamp Colorado since 2007. Sometimes I've had a significant role, other times I've taken a bit more of a back seat. I was also pretty heavily involved in Drupalcon when it was in Denver. Over the last 8 months or so, I've had quite a bit more insight into the Cons themselves through my interaction with the Drupal Association. This last year I've been the project manager for Drupalcamp Colorado 2014. This has left me with with some personal insights that might help others wanting to run a camp.

drupaldrupalcamp coloradohow to do a camp
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Stanford Web Services Blog: Agile Project Management and its flavors: where does Scrum end and Kanban begin?

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2014/07/30 - 10:18pm

Agile has become a big buzz word recently in the project management world. In this post, I'll try to clarify where some of the lines are being blurred between terms like Agile and Scrum, and what some of these terms actually mean.

Keep in mind while reading this that I am primarly trained in Scrum, so my descriptions of other Agile methodologies are only decently informed. :)

What is Agile Project Management?

From the ever-present wikipedia:

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Drupal 8 and iOS: REST Export for Drupal 8 View

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2014/07/30 - 9:25pm
REST Export for Drupal 8 View Swiss knife of Drupal 8’s REST api

Hi! Drupal Community.

As we all are working very hard for upcoming major release I am feeling excited to write this. This blog is all about REST Export feature of Drupal 8’ view. Let me first brief you about what is the REST api and than I will explain you how REST Export is important for building custom REST api for your Drupal 8.

REST (Representational State Transfer) is a web service architecture to expose your resources to outer world. It follows http architecture to expose the resources of your web site i.e you have GET, POST, PATCH,DELETE etc methods to manipulate resources with out web interface. In context to Drupal , a node will have GET method that will require node id and it will return you details related to that node in XML, JSON or HAL + JSON format. If you have ever used REST api for some famous web services like twitter, facebook then you will find those API very well defined for example  GET on /status will give you current status details and GET on /status/comments will give you comments posted on your current status. In context to Drupal we should get node details with GET on  /node/{id} and comments on particular node with GET on /node/{id}/comments. In Drupal 8 we have first REST endpoint but we don’t have second. Drupal has opt for different approach. In Drupal you can use contextual filters on view to filter content as per your parameters passed in URL . The same concept we can applies to REST Export . We can attach a REST Export to a view that only show comments with contextual filter with nodeID as parameter. So the rest export will return XML or JSON for comments related to particular node.

Here is a screenshot for it.

 

We can use REST Export with taxonomy_terms for particular vocabulary as parameter. This concept will make Drupal 8 REST api robust and it also provides good example where view modules and REST module works to gather to provide developer flexibility to develop custom REST api for their Drupal site.

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Drupal core announcements: Drupal 8 alpha 14 on August 6th

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2014/07/30 - 7:23pm

The next alpha for Drupal 8 will be alpha 14! Here is the schedule for the alpha release.

August 3rd-5th Only critical and major patches committed August 6th, 2014 Drupal 8.0.0-alpha14 released. Emergency commits only.

(Note that there are two concurrent Drupal 8 sprints Aug. 7-10, so we aren't planning to have the usual "disruptive patch window" following this alpha.)

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Appnovation Technologies: 3 Reasons to use Drupal for Enterprise Online Portal Dev

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2014/07/30 - 5:36pm
"Enterprise Content Management" or ECM minimally encompasses Document Management, Collaboration, Records Management and Web Content Management. An enterprise online portal is a specially designed website that acts as an entry point for bringing information together from all these diverse sources in a uniform way. Building an enterprise online portal presents a unique set of challenges, including integrated authentication, governance of content added by multiple content contributors, migration of legacy data, and hosting within an enterprise infrastructure among others. var switchTo5x = false;stLight.options({"publisher":"dr-75626d0b-d9b4-2fdb-6d29-1a20f61d683"});
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Dcycle: New Drupal 7 project checklist

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2014/07/30 - 4:10pm

I had this checklist documented internally, but I keep referring back to it so I'll make it available here in case anyone else needs it. The idea here is to document a minimum (not an ideal) set of modules and tasks which I do for almost all projects.

Questions to ask of a client at the project launch
  • Is your site bilingual? If so is there more than one domain?
  • What type of compatibility do you need: tablet, mobile, which versions of IE?
  • How do you see your post-launch support and core/module update contract?
  • Do you need SSL support?
  • What is your hosting arrangement?
  • Do you have a contact form?
  • What is your anti-spam method? Note that CAPTCHA is no longer useful; I like Mollom, but it's giving me more and more false positives with time.
  • Is WYSIWYG required? I strongly suggest using Markdown instead.
  • Confirm that all emails are sent in plain text, not HTML. If you're sending out HTML mail, do it right.
  • Do you need an on-site search utility? If so, some thought, and resources, need to go into it or it will be frustrating.
  • What kind of load do you expect on your site (anonymous and admin users)? This information can be used for load testing.
  • If you already have a site, should old paths of critical content map to paths on the new site?
  • Should users be allowed to create accounts (with spam considerations, and see if an admin should approve them).
Sprint Zero: starting the project

Here is what should get done in the first Agile sprint, aka Sprint Zero:

  • If you are using continuous integration, a Jenkins job for tracking the master branch: this job should fail if any test fails on the codebase, or if quality metrics (code review, for example, or pdepend metrics) reach predefined thresholds.
  • A Jenkins job for pushing to dev. This is triggered by the first job if tests pass. It pushed the new code to the dev environment, and updates the dev environment's database. The database is never cloned; rather, a site deployment module is used.
  • An issue queue is set up and the client is given access to it, and training on how to use it.
  • A wiki is set up.
  • A dev environment is set up. This is where the code gets pushed automatically if all tests pass.
  • A prod environment is set up. This environment is normally updated manually after each end of sprint demo.
  • A git repo is set up with a basic Drupal site.
  • A custom module is set up in sites/*/modules/custom: this is where custom function go.
  • A site deployment module in sites/all/modules/custom. All deployment-related code and dependencies go here. A .test file and an .install should be included.
  • A site development module is set up in sites/*/modules/custom, which is meant to contain all modules required or useful for development, as dependencies.
  • A custom theme is created.
  • An initial feature is created in sites/*/modules/features. This is where all your features will be added.
  • A "sites/*/modules/patches" folder is created (with a README.txt file, to make sure it goes into git). This is where core and contrib patches should go. Your site's maintainers should apply these patches when core or contrib modules are updated. Patch names here should include the node id and comment number on Drupal.org.
Basic module list (always used) Development modules (not enabled on production)

I normally create a custom development module with these as dependencies:

Multilingual modules Launch checklist
  • Design a custom 404, error and maintenance page.
  • Path, alias and permalink strategy. (Might require pathauto.)
  • Think of adding revisions to content types to avoid clients losing their data.
  • Don't display errors on production.
  • Optimize CSS, JS and page caching.
  • Views should be cached.
  • System messages are properly themed.
  • Prevent very simple passwords.
  • Using syslog instead of dblog on prod
In conclusion

Most shops, and most developers, have some sort of checklist like this. Mine is not any better or worse than most, but can be a good starting point. Another note: I've seen at least three Drupal teams try, and fail, to implement a "Drupal Starter kit for Company XYZ" and keep it under version control. The problem with that approach, as opposed to a checklist, is that it's not lightweight enough: it is a software product which needs maintenance, and after a while no one maintains it.

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Modules Unraveled: 113 - Updates on the WalkHub project with Kristof Van Tomme - Modules Unraveled Podcast

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2014/07/30 - 3:39pm
Published: Wed, 07/30/14Download this episodeWalkhub
  • You’ve been on the show before to talk about walkthrough.it, but some things have changed since then. So, can you give us an overview of what Walkhub is?
  • What are walkthroughs?
  • What is your pricing model on Walkhub?
  • You’re in the process of a second Indiegogo campaign, but what was the first one for?
    • How did your first Indiegogo campaign go?
  • What is the current Indiegogo camaipn for?
    • What’s the status on that?
  • Why are you doing another campaign? Why aren’t you out of BETA yet? What’s the story there?
AMA
  • You just did an AMA on Reddit yesterday. How did that go?
  • What were some common questions? Or ones that stuck out to you?
Episode Links: Kristof on drupal.orgKristof on TwitterIndiegogo CampaignWalkhub.netReddit AMAWalkhub Demo on YouTubeTags: 
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