Nu ook in het Nederlands.
 

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clemens-tolboom commented on pull request dreditor/dreditor#93

On github - Sat, 2014/09/20 - 7:41pm
September 20, 2014 clemens-tolboom commented on pull request dreditor/dreditor#93

Cool ... I'm on the 'Sprint attendance availability for DrupalCon Amsterdam 2014' sheet too. Will recheck later this week what to do when.

Jonathan Brown: Generating safe markup in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2014/09/19 - 8:29pm

The most insecure part of a Drupal website is typically the theme. Drupal 8 is using Twig as its template layer. This is a massive leap forward. It's no longer possible to put SQL queries in a template file!

Furthermore, Drupal 8 is now taking advantage of a security feature of Twig: autoescape. Every variable in a Twig template will be escaped if it is not marked as safe. This makes it much harder to introduce XSS vulnerabilities.

Unfortunately any HTML that your module produces will end up being double-escaped and the HTML itself will be visible instead of the browser's rendering of it. The quick and dirty way to fix this problem is to wrap your string with \Drupal\Component\Utility\SafeMarkup::set:

<?php
$output = SafeMarkup::set('<div class="my-module">' . $my_variable . '<div>');
?>

But this defeats the whole point of using autoescape. The correct approach is that all HTML created by a module should be declared in a Twig template. This means that all the variables are guaranteed to be escaped. It is also very easy to implement.

First you need to declare the template in your hook_theme():

<?php
function my_module_theme(array $existing, $type, $theme, $path) {
  return array(
    'my_module_my_template' => array(
      'template' => 'my-template',
      'variables' => array(
        'variable1' => NULL,
        'variable2' => NULL,
      ),
    ),
  );
}
?>

You then need to create a Twig template file, for example my_module/templates/my-template.html.twig:

{#
/**
* @file
* Default theme implementation for my template.
*
* Available variables
* - variable1: The first variable.
* - variable2: The second variable.
*/
#}
<div class="my-template">
  This is the first variable: <b>{{ variable1 }}</b>.
  This is the second variable: <i>{{ variable2 }}</i>.
</div>

When you need to generate your html you should use the drupal_render() function:

<?php
$render = array(
  '#theme' => 'my_module_my_template',
  '#variable1' => t("First"),
  '#variable2' => t("Second"),
);

$output = drupal_render($render);
?>

Strings returned by drupal_render() are automatically marked as safe and will not be escaped again.

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Appnovation Technologies: Straight from the Source: Achieving Your Goals with osCaddie

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2014/09/19 - 8:02pm
See why global non-profit organization Teach For All chose our osCaddie solution var switchTo5x = false;stLight.options({"publisher":"dr-75626d0b-d9b4-2fdb-6d29-1a20f61d683"});
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Drupal core announcements: Today there are zero Drupal 8 beta blockers! Here's what's next.

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2014/09/19 - 7:17pm

As of 06:58 UTC today, September 19, there are zero Drupal 8 beta blockers. This means that, after more than nine months of focused effort, we are almost ready to release the first Drupal 8 beta!

When will Drupal 8.0.0-beta 1 be released?

Today (September 19), we have released one more Drupal 8 alpha, Drupal 8.0.0-alpha15. This alpha can be treated as a "beta release candidate". If no additional beta blockers are identified in the next 10-14 days, we will then tag the first beta! (If we do discover additional beta blockers, then we will evaluate them and adjust our timeline.)

What does beta mean?

Betas are good testing targets for developers and site builders who are comfortable reporting (and where possible, fixing) their own bugs, and who are prepared to rebuild their test sites from scratch if necessary. Beta releases are not recommended for non-technical users, nor for production websites.

See Dries' original announcement about the beta for more information on the beta and the criteria for beta blockers. The explanation of the Drupal 8 release management tags explains the differences between critical beta blockers and other issues impacted by the beta phase.

How can I help? Help stabilize the beta

The beta is an important milestone for Drupal 8. Help test the final alpha for critical and potentially beta-blocking bugs, and take extra care to avoid introducing regressions during this pre-beta window.

Beta deadline issues (complete by September 28)

This final pre-beta window is our final chance to complete beta deadline issues. As a reminder, changes to the following have a beta deadline:

  1. Non-critical changes to the core data model. (See the beta-to-beta upgrade path and data model stability policy and the beta-to-beta-upgrade path critical task for ongoing discussion of what is included in the Drupal 8 data model, how we will handle small data model additions, and when we will support a beta-to-beta upgrade path).
  2. Non-critical, backward-compatibility-breaking changes to the public APIs of the following critical subsystems:
    • The Configuration system
    • The Entity Field API
    • The Plugin API
    • The Menu and Routing APIs
  3. Other broad, non-critical changes that significantly break backward compatibility, at core maintainer discretion.

Beta deadline issues can be committed up until Sunday, September 28, after which there will be a freeze to ensure stability. If you have questions or concerns about completing a particular change, speak to a core maintainer about it soon.

If you know of issues that would introduce any of these changes, add the "beta deadline" issue tag so that contributors can find and help complete them before the beta. The following issues are particular priorities:

(Also see the full queue of known beta deadline issues.)

Keep in mind that API and schema additions may still be made during the beta phase, at core maintainer discretion. Limited API and data model changes will also happen during the beta phase, though core maintainers will try to isolate these changes to non-fundamental APIs or critical bug fixes. (See the ongoing beta-to-beta-upgrade path discussion.)

Beta target issues

"Beta target" issues are issues that we hope to complete early during the beta phase, but can still be added to Beta 2 or later. These are the next priority after important beta deadline issues. We especially need to work on:

(Also see the full queue of known beta target issues).

Thank you!

Many thanks to the 234 contributors who have helped resolve our 177 beta blockers in Drupal 8, and to the incredibly dedicated Drupal 8 branch maintainers. Your focus and effort is helping us build a solid Drupal 8 beta and, going forward, a better release.

Categories:

clemens-tolboom opened issue wizzlern/drupal8-dev-training#4

On github - Fri, 2014/09/19 - 6:19pm
September 19, 2014 clemens-tolboom opened issue wizzlern/drupal8-dev-training#4 Permission need update

clemens-tolboom commented on issue clemens-tolboom/uml-generator-php#66

On github - Fri, 2014/09/19 - 6:16pm
September 19, 2014 clemens-tolboom commented on issue clemens-tolboom/uml-generator-php#66

Cannot reproduce. I just ran cd /tmp git clone git@github.com:clemens-tolboom/uml-generator-php.git cd uml-generator-php uml-generator-php generate…

clemens-tolboom deleted branch feature/use-unicode-class at build2be/drupal8-demo

On github - Fri, 2014/09/19 - 6:09pm
clemens-tolboom deleted branch feature/use-unicode-class at build2be/drupal8-demo September 19, 2014

Bluespark Labs: Cleaning our repository history

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2014/09/19 - 5:49pm

In our daily work we all make mistakes in our git commits. Sometimes this errors can easily be repaired just by reverting our commits. But if we are working in a public repository and we have accidentally pushed some sensitive information, we now have a problem.

That sensitive information is in our repository history and anybody who has the enough time to explore can gain access to that. Our clients or even ourselves are now dealing with a privacy issue.

We can always try to repair that commit in our local environment and push our code again using the --force parameter. But we know, when you do that, a kitten dies. And if your team members already pushed something, everything in the repository will be messed up.

So the best option is to try and fix this in a more elegant way that allow us to erase all the traces of our mistake, but preserves repository integrity.

Git provides the filter-branch command, but sometimes this powerful tool becomes too complicated and slow. In trying to find an easier way to do it, finally came across the BFG Repo-Cleaner.

This tool is an alternative to git filter-branch that provides a faster and easier way to clean git repositories. It is written in Java, so you need to make sure you have JRE 6.0 or above installed. To clean your repository you only have to follow the steps below:

Clone your repository using the --mirror option. Beforehand, you should repair manually your mistakes in the repository.

1 $ git clone --mirror git://example.com/my-repo.git

Now, download BFG and execute it against your cloned repository.
1 $ java -jar bfg.jar --strip-blobs-bigger-than&nbsp;1M&nbsp;my-repo.git
This step will remove all the blobs bigger than 1MB from your repository.

Once the index has been cleaned, examine your repository's history and then use the standard git gc command to strip out the unwanted dirty data, which Git will now recognise as surplus to requirements:
1 2 3 $ cd my-repo.git $ git reflog expire --expire=now --all $ git gc --prune=now --aggressive

Finally, once you're happy with the updated state of your repo, push it back up
1 $ git push

If everything went well, your repository won't include any of the accidentally committed files.

Here you have some common examples to use with Drupal:
Delete all files named 'id_rsa' or 'id_dsa' :
1 $ java -jar bfg.jar --delete-files id_{dsa,rsa} &nbsp;my-repo.git

Delete database dumps:
1 $ java -jar bfg.jar --delete-files *{mysql,mysql.gz}

Delete files folder:
1 $ java -jar bfg.jar --delete-folders files

We have to remark that BFG assumes that you have repaired your repository before executing it. You need to make sure your current commits are clean. This protects your current work and gives you peace of mind knowing that the BFG is only changing your repo history, not meddling with the current files of your project.

Finally, here you have some useful related links:

Tags: Drupal Planet
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Code Karate: Drupal 7 Honeypot Module

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2014/09/19 - 2:48pm
Episode Number: 169

In this tutorial you will learn about the Honeypot module. The Honeypot modules is a SPAM prevention module that uses a hidden form field to catch SPAM bots from posting onto your site. This tutorial shows you how to configure the module to work on various forms on your site.

Tags: DrupalFormsWebformDrupal 7Drupal PlanetSpam Prevention
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HackMonkey: Configuring CSS Source Maps & Compass

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2014/09/19 - 10:04am

After hours of searching Google, lots of trial and error, and a bunch of grumbling, I had a breakthrough and finally figured out how to get Source Maps to work under Chrome and Compass. The problem is that this functionality has been around for over a year in various forms in the pre-release versions of Sass and Chrome. As such, many of the posts I found were out dated and didn't work with the current, stable versions. So this post is partially to document the process for myself (and a small victory lap!), but hopefully someone else will get something out of it.

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Drupal core announcements: Drupal core updates for September 18th, 2014

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/09/18 - 11:43pm
What's new with Drupal 8?

The big news this week is we're still on one beta-blocker. Patches for the remaining beta blocker are coming rapidly with @effulgentsia, @plach and @fago working hard to get it over the line. Could we have zero beta blockers by DrupalCon?

Other keys issues to land this week include Remove ArrayAccess from FormState - never again deal with random arrays - rejoice - $form_state is a first-class object!. Thanks to @timplunkett and others who helped get this through. If you have any contrib projects accessing $form_state in an array fashion eg $form_state['values']['fooey']; then you need to familiarize yourself with the change record.

In a further sign that Drupal 8 is maturing into a modern HTTP framework, we now have support for a stack-php based middleware this will allow us to clean up how page caching, conent negotiotiaton, implementing ban.module's functionalty, options requests and various other elements of the request processing pipeline work. For more information on middlewares see Stackphp.com and this article or see the list of existing middlewares supported by stack-php, and therefore likely to be compatible with Drupal.

In the same vein Modularize kernel exception handling brought some much needed cleanup to to the way we handle exceptions and enables contrib modules to easily add their own exception handling, particularly for custom REST formats.

Over in Convert UnitTestBase to PHPUnit and Remove UnitTestBase, @sun, @Berdir and @tim.plunkett have been working towards removing Simpletest-based Unit tests. There are plenty of sessions around the future of testing at Drupalcon Amsterdam so be sure to check these out if testing is your thing.

The Consensus Banana is moving full-steam ahead with loads of issues resolved to move classes out of preprocessing and into templates landing this week. Meanwhile in Split Seven's style.css into SMACSS categories @LewisNyman has been making great strides towards bringing sanity to Seven's CSS structure.

@WimLeers, @alexpott and @chx worked tirelessly in Add cacheability metadata to access checks to harmonize our access-checking systems and add cacheability to the access results in the form of an AccessResultInterface, great work!

Over in Remove text_processing option from text fields, expose existing string field types as plain text in UI @Berdir, @Wim Leers, @dawehner consolidated our text field types, an important change for Site Builders.

Finally, PHPStorm 8 has been released with lots of support for Drupal 8 APIs!

Where's Drupal 8 at in terms of release?

Since the last Drupal Core Update on Sept. 4, we've fixed 19 critical issues and 24 major issues, and added 12 criticals and 19 majors. That puts us overall at 97 release-blocking critical issues and 644 major issues.

Where can I help? Top criticals to hit this week

Each week, we check with core maintainers and contributors for the "extra critical" criticals that are blocking other work. These issues are often tough problems with a long history. If you're familiar with the problem-space of one of these issues and have the time to dig in, help drive it forward by reviewing, improving, and testing its patch, and by making sure the issue's summary is up to date and any API changes are documented with a draft change record, we could use your help!

There are also several beta deadline issues that, while not quite critical, will need to be done before the beta if they're to be done at all. The following beta deadline issues are especially important:

More ways to help
  • Now that we're nearing beta, its time to turn our attention to release-blocking criticals.
  • Beta target issues are issues that can be added to Beta 1, Beta 2, or later, but would be best done sooner rather than later for solid beta releases.
  • With a looming beta, now we can ramp up our efforts on contrib modules - there's a sprint at Amsterdam just for that - so put your name on the list if this is your thing.

As always, if you're new to contributing to core, check out Core contribution mentoring hours. Twice per week, you can log into IRC and helpful Drupal core mentors will get you set up with answers to any of your questions, plus provide some useful issues to work on.

You can also help by sponsoring independent Drupal core development.

Notable Commits

The best of git log --since "2014-09-04" --pretty=oneline (200 commits in total):

  • Issue 2333113 by effulgentsia, plach: Add an EntityDefinitionUpdateManager so that entity handlers can respond (e.g., by updating db schema) to code updates in a controlled way (e.g., from update.php).
  • Issue 1857256 by dawehner, xjm, tim.plunkett, jibran, ParisLiakos, hussainweb, pcambra, ekes, InternetDevels, rhabbachi, rdrh555, tstoeckler, oadaeh, Gábor Hojtsy, vijaycs85: Fixed Convert the taxonomy listing and feed at /taxonomy/term/%term to Views.
  • Issue 2333501 by swentel | marcvangend: Implement ThirdPartySettingsInterface in EntityView|FormDisplay.
  • Issue 1740492 by dawehner, damiankloip, dasjo, xjm: Implement a default entity views data handler.
  • Issue 2331019 by slashrsm: Implement ThirdPartySettingsInterface in Vocabulary.
  • Issue 2320157 by moshe weitzman, Wim Leers, penyaskito, tim.plunkett: Generate placeholder content for Field types - essentially devel generate in core.
  • Issue 2329485 by damiankloip, dawehner: Allow permissions.yml files to declare 'permission_callbacks' for dynamic permissions.
  • Issue 1898478 by joelpittet, Cottser, lokapujya, m1r1k, jstoller, er.pushpinderrana, duellj, organicwire, jessebeach, idflood, Jalandhar, Risse, derheap, galooph, mike.roberts, tlattimore, nadavoid, LinL, steveoliver, chakrapani, likin, killerpoke, EVIIILJ, vlad.dancer, podarok, m86 | c4rl: Menu.inc - Convert theme_ functions to Twig.
  • Issue 1915056 by Arla, Berdir, amateescu | catch: Use entity reference for taxonomy parents.
  • Issue 2321745 by larowlan, tim.plunkett: Add #type => 'path' that accepts path but optionally stores URL object or route name and parameters.
  • Issue 474004 by mdrummond, kim.pepper, Wim Leers, jibran, tim.plunkett, joachim | JohnAlbin: Add options to system menu block so primary and secondary menus can be blocks rather than variables - essentially menu block module in core.
  • Issue 2068331 by roderik, slashrsm, pcambra, Sharique, piyuesh23, vijaycs85 | plach: Convert comment SQL queries to the Entity Query API.
  • Issue 2226493 by Berdir, Wim Leers, m1r1k, mr.baileys, andypost, scor, cbr, joelpittet: Apply formatters and widgets to Node base fields.
  • Issue 2302563 by chx, dawehner: Fixed Access check Url objects.

You can also always check the Change records for Drupal core for the full list of Drupal 8 API changes from Drupal 7.

Drupal 8 Around the Interwebs Drupal 8 in "Real Life" Whew! That's a wrap!

Do you follow Drupal Planet with devotion, or keep a close eye on the Drupal event calendar, or git pull origin 8.0.x every morning without fail before your coffee? We're looking for more contributors to help compile these posts. You could either take a few hours once every six weeks or so to put together a whole post, or help with one section more regularly. Read more about how you can volunteer to help with these posts!

Finally special thanks to KatteKrab for assisting with compiling this edition.

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Drupal Watchdog: The Automagic Speed-Up Cache

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/09/18 - 7:05pm
Feature Motivation

The granularity of cache expiration in Drupal has been a long-standing problem.

One can have the most effective cache in the world, but if it clears entirely on any content change, it is not really workable. A “page” in Drupal can have blocks, listing, entities, regions, and many other objects. When one contained item changes, the container of that item needs to be fully rebuilt; often, that is the whole page, a problem requiring a much-needed solution.

Why can't we just rebuild the parts that have actually changed?

Consider what would be the best case scenario here. Assume that every item listed above can be cached separately. Now if one single entity changes, the following would be our "perfect" page request:

  1. Drupal bootstraps.
  2. Drupal builds the page.
  3. Drupal notices that only the “content” region has changed and retrieves the remaining regions from cache.
  4. Drupal re-builds the content region.
  5. Drupal notices only one listing in the content region has changed and retrieves the remaining blocks from cache.
  6. Drupal builds the “missing” block.
  7. The block contains a listing of entities.
  8. Drupal re-builds the listing, and entity_view() is called on these entities.
  9. Drupal retrieves all entities except the changed one from cache.

We would have a bootstrap, then we would see just one region call, one block call, one listing call, and one entity building call. Is this really possible?

Yes and no.

There are certain implementation limitations – especially around page assets – and a unified caching strategy needs to take them into account.

State of the Art

Render Caching is the saving of HTML content in a storage cache, while retaining assets like CSS and JS files and other “out-of-band” data. It can be used for reconstructing the page content, without changing the state the page would have without render caching active. The render cached HTML markup needs to be removed from the cache, or updated in the cache when the objects used for generation of the markup change.

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Acquia: Drupal 8 developer experience wins, the PHP Renaissance and more with Angie Byron

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/09/18 - 6:06pm

Part 2 of a 2-part conversation with Angie Byron in front of the cameras at NYC Camp 2014, held at United Nations headquarters in New York. In this part of our conversation, we talk about improvements in the Drupal developer- and learning-experience thanks to the major changes under the hood in Drupal 8; the "PHP Renaissance"; and about being welcomed "back into the fold" of the greater PHP world thanks to the nature of Drupal 8 being a sort of "meta project" (my words) that includes parts of many others.

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ThinkShout: The Small Business of Open Source

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/09/18 - 4:00pm

This summer, ThinkShout was named the 9th Fastest Growing Private Company in Portland, Oregon. Admittedly, this came as sort of a shock to me and Lev. Over three and a half years, we’ve grown the company from two dudes renting desks in an incubator space to a full-time team of 17 professionals averaging 10 years of experience each. But most of the time, it doesn’t feel like we’ve come up with any secret sauce for running a successful business. We try to listen to our employees and our peers in the industry. We partner with nonprofit clients trying to make the world a better place, and we do our best to treat them with integrity in all aspects of our work - from our design and engineering practices to our approach to project management and our billing process.

Perhaps there are a few things that we do particularly well. We win our fair share of work in coopetition with our peers in the nonprofit tech industry. But then again, in talking with our friends at ZivTech, Gorton Studios, Aten Design Group, Jackson River, Forum One Communications, and others, what we consistently hear is that there is more than enough work to go around in the world of technology for good.

How is that? What are the mechanics of "the small business of open source" that work for all these firms and, more importantly, for their customers?

You could tackle this question from a number of angles. Conventional wisdom suggests that the business value of open source, both in the for-profit and nonprofit sectors, is simply: you get a lot of stuff for free. This is true. With open source, you avoid licensing fees. With an open source platform such as Drupal, you can pick and choose among literally tens of thousands of free tools and extensions.

But this perspective speaks only to open source’s initial customer appeal. It speaks to the coarse outlines of the sales cycle of open source. You can’t just build a sustainable business off the idea that a platform like Drupal provides a lot of stuff for free.

So, what is the guiding principle of growing a small business around open source? For us, it boils down to:

Our customers benefit tremendously from their own contributions to open source.

Put a bit more bluntly:

Our customers benefit from paying us to give away their code.

To illustrate this point, I’d like to run through some of our numbers as a small business of open source. The following statistics are relative to the publication date of this blog post:

  • ThinkShout’s team includes 8 engineers with a total of 4,269 commits to contributed modules hosted on Drupal.org.

  • We actively maintain 24 contributed modules that represent over 100,000 lines of code.

  • The combined installation base of these modules (i.e., the aggregated number of websites using each of these modules) is over 42,000.

Interestingly, our staff has grown 750% from the end of our first quarter. The growth in adoption of our contributed tools by the community (1,400% since the end of Q1 2011) tracks closely with the growth of our quarterly revenues (1,300%).

Obviously, these statistics are only related anecdotally. On their own, they don’t prove that our open source contributions drive our success.

Still, it is interesting to look at some of the statistics around our client work:

  • Averaging the last four $80-$150K Drupal website projects we’ve completed, a typical project in this price range is made up of 36,289 lines of custom code and exported site configuration (excluding the theme, or the implementation of the graphic design).

  • In addition, most of these projects include the release of 1,000-5,000 lines of contributed code. In other words, clients who engage with us on these sorts of projects pay for us either to contribute back major features to a contributed module, or to release one or two stand-alone modules.

  • But what’s most interesting is that each of these projects leverage at least 4 to 5 of the contributed modules that other clients have paid for on previous projects. Each leverages around 20,000 lines of contributed code that our team has written for similar use cases.

Of course, these statistics reflect the significant cost savings to our clients in going with an open source solution. They get a lot of free stuff…

But more importantly, our clients benefit from becoming financially invested in the direction and cultivation of these open source projects. By becoming committers, they are ensured that their requirements will continue to be prioritized in the future development of the modules their website depend on. They benefit too by the tens, sometimes hundreds, of open source developers reviewing their contributed code for bug fixes and improvements.

Moreover, by releasing the code that powers their websites, our clients connect with other organizations with similar requirements who, in turn, will often contribute additional features to these projects over time. As a case in point, we released the Leaflet module, a web-based mapping solution, on behalf of the Intertwine Alliance in the summer of 2011. The Alliance paid for the initial release, which included a modest yet highly-innovative feature set. Since then, 36 different Drupal developers have contributed code to improve the module, and over 4,500 websites have adopted it.

Similarly, we initially released RedHen CRM, a native CRM solution built entirely within Drupal, for a small cohort of nonprofits with similar needs. In this case, we actually got these nonprofits to work together to brainstorm and prioritize their CRM requirements. Pooling funding, this group helped us launch RedHen publicly in the spring of 2012. Since then, over a dozen of our clients have continued to invest in RedHen, and it has been adopted on over 850 websites around the world. Most impressively, those initial clients that funded our early work on RedHen continue to upgrade their sites with each new release, benefitting from hundreds of thousands of dollars of free development.

Client investments in open source present many less tangible benefits as well. While our developers are inspired to support our mission-driven nonprofit customers, they are particularly excited (and therefore, keenly focused) when their work leads to open source contributions. Not only does this lead to high-quality engineering, it helps reduce turnover among our engineering team, which can be costly for clients. Among our team’s contributors to Drupal, our average turnover is less than half of the industry standard in information technology.

For readers of this post who represent agencies that also contribute to open source, I’d be curious if your data and experience track to ours. Business and nonprofit readers whose teams have paid for open source contributions, I’d be curious to hear your stories as well. After all, open source is all about transparency, which we believe makes us a more effective business.

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Code Karate: Drupal 7 Entity Registration Views, Access and Wait List

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/09/18 - 3:53pm
Episode Number: 168

Following up on the previous Daily Dose of Drupal episode on the Entity Registration module, this episode looks at some of the additional Entity Registration add on modules.

In this episode you will learn:

Tags: DrupalDrupal 7Drupal Planet
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Unimity Solutions Drupal Blog: Modify Apache Solr Queries in Drupal

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/09/18 - 7:27am

In a recent project I got the opportunity to tweak Drupal’s Apache solr queries.In this blog p

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PreviousNext: Report from Drupal Camp Islamabad

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/09/18 - 5:42am

After Drupal Camp Lahore and Drupal Camp Islamabad earlier this year, I was once again inivited to Drupal Camp Islamabad to present a session on Drupal 8 as a framework.

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Forum One: Using Acquia Dev Desktop to Set Up a Drupal 8 Code Sprint Environment

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/09/18 - 3:10am

With Drupal 8 looming on the horizon, everyone is talking about doing their part to contribute. In fact — shameless plug alert — Forum One is running a Drupal 8 Code Sprint tomorrow night! Come on out and code with us. 

Wanting to get involved but new to Drupal development, I wasn’t really sure where to start. Through a Drupal DC meetup, I was introduced to the Drupal Ladder. Following the Drupal Core Ladder, I got a practice Drupal environment set up, got familiar with the issue queue, and tested some patches! Of course, all the issues and patches written and tested for the LEARN portion of the ladder only affect the sandbox version of D8 used in the tutorials, but it gives you a great idea of what to expect.

After working through the Ladder, I felt ready to attend some Drupal code sprints. However, one of the biggest problems new people have at code sprints is setting up their Drupal environment. As a newbie, I found the quickest way to set up a test environment on my Mac was through the Acquia Dev Desktop. This is a stack built specifically for Drupal (it’s pre-loaded with Apache, MySQL, PHP, etc.), so no downloads other than Drupal itself should be necessary. For this tutorial, we’ll be using Acquia Dev Desktop 2 Beta.

Note: although I am using the Mac version, the Windows instructions should be the same.

Installing Acquia Dev Desktop 2 Beta

From the downloads page, click on Mac / Win Download within the, “Get the Acquia Dev Desktop 2 Beta” box at the top of the page. Locate your download file and double click the file to launch the installer.

  • Click Next on the initial screen. The following screen will give you an overview of what is included in the Dev Desktop package: Apache, MySQL, PHP, etc. Review these and click Next.
  • Review the license agreement, click Yes if you accept the terms, and then click Next.
  • Make note of this next screen. This lets you choose the install locations of your stack and Sites folder. I would recommend leaving these as the default selections.

  • The next screen displays the port settings that will be used by Dev Desktop. Do not change these. Simply make note of them and click Next.

  • Review your information, then click Next, then Next again to begin the installation.
  • Once the installation has completed, click on Finish. If the program pops up, minimize it. We must first download a copy of Drupal 8.
Downloading and Setting Up Your Drupal 8 Environment

After installing Dev Desktop, we can now get our Drupal 8 environment running:

  • Download your desired version of Drupal 8 (use Drupal 8.0.x-dev if you are going to help test and develop D8) by clicking on the .tar file for Mac or .zip for PC in the Download column. Be sure to extract the tar/zip folder if your system does not automatically do it!

  • You can place the files inside your Sites folder, or simply leave it where it downloaded. It is advisable to change the name of the directory from “drupalx.x-x.x” to something simpler (e.g. drupal8, drupaltest, d8dev, etc.).
  • Bring back up Acquia Dev Desktop, or launch it. Click on Start with an existing Drupal site located on my computer.

  • For Local codebase folder, select the Drupal root folder you just downloaded and click on Open. You can leave Local site name as is, or change it up.

  • Drupal 8 requires at least PHP 5.4, so select the PHP version 5.4 your Dev Desktop came with.
  • For Database, select Create a new database. You can leave New database name as is, or alter as you like.

  • Click OK, and your site will be imported into Dev Desktop.
  • Select your site from the left, if it is not already selected. At the top of Dev Desktop, click on your Local site URL and it will come up in your default browser.

  • On initial launch, your site should go to /install.php. If not, manually enter /install.php to the end of your site URL (e.g. http://drupal8.local:8083/install.php). Select your language, and click on Save and continue.
  • Leave Standard selected as your installation profile. Click Save and continue.
  • The database info should transfer and auto-fill into the fields, but just in case, enter the following info:
    • Database name: name you created during the import (New database name)
    • Database username: drupaluser or root
    • Leave the password blank
    • Under the Advanced Options: Host: 127.0.0.1 & Port number: 33067

Click on Save and continue once the information has been filled out.

Drupal will now install your site. Once finished, enter whatever you’d like for the site name, email, and user configuration, and your Drupal site should be up and running! Be sure to remember the username and password for the account you created, as this is your main administrator account (user 1).

That’s All, Folks

Installing Acquia Dev Desktop is fairly quick simple if you follow these steps. Don’t let not having a dev environment stop you from participating in Drupal 8 code sprints, as there are plenty of other AMP stacks available to install, making sure you’re comfortable with one goes a long way. With my development environment setup all that’s left to do now is to actually write a patch…Maybe I’ll take care of that during Forum One’s code sprint tomorrow night!

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Drupal Easy: Run, Don't Walk to Drupal 8 Migrate in Core Sprints

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/09/18 - 1:48am

Have you always wanted to get involved with Drupal core development but don’t know where to begin? Have a Drupal 6 site that you’re looking to upgrade to Drupal 8? The Drupal 8 Migrate in Core initiative aims to provide a robust and extensible migration path from Drupal 6 and Drupal 7 to Drupal 8. A lot of work has already been done, but we’re looking to increase our throughput by training up some testers and developers to contribute to the cause.

To that end, we’ve planned two in-person events and an ongoing virtual event where you can get some facetime with other contributors to get you up-to-speed on the current progress and how you can help. Development experience isn’t required! It takes all types of contributors to complete a project of this scope. We have opportunities for manual testing, documentation writing, UX, theming, patch testing, and patch creating. If you need more of a challenge, I’m sure that chx, benjy, and mikeryan can find something for you to sink your teeth into!

If you can’t wait to get started, please check out how you can properly configure your system in order to contribute. Even if you just want to do some manual testing, you’ll want to check this out. Once your system is ready to go, then find me in IRC (#drupal-migrate) or find us at an upcoming event.

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