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Larry Garfield: The Functional PHP tour

Planet Drupal - Mon, 2014/04/14 - 6:35am

Ever heard of functional programming? Not procedural programming, but actual functional programming. Probably, as some fancy academic thing that no one really uses, right?

Did you know you can do it in PHP, too? It's true. In fact, I'll be speaking about it four times in the next couple of weeks!

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Darren Mothersele: I Don't Use Recruitment Agents

Planet Drupal - Mon, 2014/04/14 - 1:00am

I started working with Drupal full time in 2007. I knew back then I was on to a winner, as none of the other open-source systems I evaluated at the time offered the same power and flexibility. It took a while for mainstream web development community to catch on, but over the years the Drupal community has seen massive growth, and now Drupal powers some of the biggest sites on the internet, well over 1 million websites.

But, this success brings problems, and one recurring complaint I've heard over the years has been about the difficulty in finding top Drupal talent. This has made Drupal a prime target for recruitment agencies deception and dirty tricks.

Wunderroot are a well known company in the Drupal world, and are known to be a good employer. As UK MD, Steve Parks, says in his blog We Don't Use Recruitment Agents

We would really love to be able to use recruitment agencies — imagine: a team of people with genuine experience in hiring great staff, with fantastic contacts books, and taking the role of a trusted friend to guide us through advertising, filtering, selecting and engaging the right people. It'd be fantastic. We'd pay good money for that. Unfortunately, that's not how most recruitment agencies work in reality.

I have experience with working with recruitment consultants from both sides. Before I started freelancing in Drupal full time I was running a digital music startup. As a successful startup we experienced fast growth, and didn't have the resources in-house to do thorough candidate searches. We used a couple of recruitment consultants and were consistently disappointed. Candidates were misrepresented, to the point where one didn't recognise his own CV in an interview.

On the other side, as a candidate, I do not use agencies for work. One experience in particular put me off for many years.

I interviewed for a position, but decided after the first interview that, although the opportunity was interesting, I knew I was not the right candidate. The company wanted to invite me back for a second interview, but I told the consultant that I was not interested, and explained my reasons. Unfortunately, the consultant would not take no for an answer, and I was subjected to a week of harassment (to the point of bullying) over my decision.

In We Don't Use Recruitment Agents, Steve Parks tells of a "bait and switch" operation where developers had been approached by recruitment agencies saying that they had been engaged by Wunderroot to headhunt (the bait) in order to get someone interested, but then saying the position was filled and proposing other positions (the switch).

I'm not sure if it's the same dirty tactic in operation, but I have heard in the past of an employer receiving my CV from an agency claiming to represent me. The employer knew me directly, so checked, and they had an out-of-date CV that I had given to the agency for a different opportunity previously. This came up in conversation at a Drupal meetup and it was suggested that this is probably not a mistake as other developers had heard of it happening too.

The extreme of recruiters' tricks are documented in this old post from Kernel Mag in which Consol Partners are accused of "telling outrageous lies to candidates and start-ups".

In a post on recruiting trends ERE suggest that, in an era when candidate sourcing is becoming easier as everyone is "findable" on the internet, recruiters should "shift toward improving the various selling components of recruiting". I'm not sure exactly what they mean by 'selling components' but I would beg recruitment agencies not to do this, and instead focus on providing value.

Recruiters - Do This:

Here's a short TODO list for recruiters:

  • Clean up your industry: Get rid of the deception and bullying.
  • Provide genuine value (c.f. Steve Parks quote above).
Until then...

If you're a reputable company looking to source Drupal developers, or you are a Drupal developer working in London or the UK, get in touch. I'm starting a free job board on DrupalDeveloper.co.uk.

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Gábor Hojtsy: The NYC Camp Drupal 8 Multilingual session that wasn't

Planet Drupal - Sun, 2014/04/13 - 4:54pm

Did you expect to see how Drupal 8 improves multilingual tasks at NYC Camp? Well, bad luck! I'd like to apologise in place of the NYC Camp team for their messing up the schedule yesterday and their lack of communication following. I was told to set up for my presentation in a room that was not even meant to be a presentation room, let alone my presentation room, even though it was confirmed by several volunteers coming to the room. Later on yesterday, several people asked me why I did not show up for my session. I did.

The good news is that I delivered this talk before, and although the latest recorded copy is definitely not as up to date as the one I worked on for NYC Camp, you can watch it here (fast forward to 12:04 to the start of the presentation itself):

I would have loved to talk to you, bring you all the good news, answer your questions and hopefully inspire you to join our efforts. I did not get a chance this time. Hope to catch up with you sometime later at other events!

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Freelock : Heartbleed - Do you need to do anything?

Planet Drupal - Sun, 2014/04/13 - 12:46am

Everybody is writing about Heartbleed this week. The reason? It probably affects more people than any other vulnerability we've ever seen. If you ever log into any web site, anywhere, your password might be revealed -- and that is just the start. The biggest problem? Nobody really knows if somebody actually used this attack.

HeartbleedE-CommerceSecuritySSLDrupal Planet
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Zero to Drupal: DrupalCampSTL 2014

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2014/04/11 - 8:48pm

In just over two weeks, The St. Louis Drupal User's Group will host St. Louis' first ever DrupalCamp. The final sessions were announced last week and it's shaping up to be an awesome experience for a wide variety of folks looking to learn more about Drupal.

As @geerlingguy, myself, and a few other great folks from the STLDUG began discussing the idea of hosting St. Louis' first ever DrupalCamp last year, we decided that we wanted to gear our first camp towards those who were just getting started with Drupal. I've been a part of the STLDUG for several years now and two things have been constant: newcomers looking to learn more about Drupal, and a strong need for Drupal developers in the St. Louis area. What's more is that the community of developers, stakeholders, and hobbyists in this city is nothing short of amazing. Naturally, it only made sense to put together a camp that would allow us to share our experiences and expertise with those wanting to learn.

So if you're in or around the St. Louis area and you're looking to learn more about Drupal, check out the sessions, register today, and I look forward to meeting you on April 26th!

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Palantir: D8FTW: Rolling Out the Welcome Mat

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2014/04/11 - 8:28pm

At Museums and the Web earlier this month Ken Rickard and I ran a developer training seminar for the still-in-alpha-but-getting-there Drupal 8. It was a small group, which wasn't surprising given the event. One of the most interesting things about it, though, was that there was only one PHP developer in the room.

The most active student in the class was an experienced C# developer. He had never worked with PHP before, and, really, didn't seem like he was going to start any time soon. He was mostly there to get a sense for how to integrate Drupal with his company's product for museums.

Despite that, he was able to follow the material just fine. In fact, the only questions he had were related to PHP itself: Its shared-nothing runtime model, the magic __construct() method name, etc. The actual software engineering parts, the general syntax, dependency injection... all of those were easy. Most notably, when we got to the concept of services he even said aloud "Oh those, yeah, easy."

Here's an experienced developer who has never used PHP before, much less Drupal, and he could follow a code-intensive Drupal 8 training class. Let that sink in.

There's an old adage that once you know one language you can easily pick up another because it's all "just programming". That's not actually true; you can easily pick up another language in a similar family. Jumping between PHP, C#, and Java is fairly easy, but don't expect to jump right into Haskell, Erlang, or ML (or vice versa).

That's why our C# developer was able to follow Drupal 8 so easily. PHP's object-oriented model is, by design, very similar to that in Java, C#, and by extension somewhat to C++. It has its own quirks and flavor, to be sure, as does any language. The basic concepts, though — classes, methods, interfaces, services, domain objects, dependency injection — are fairly easily transferrable between them. The best practices that apply in one language are, generally, at least decent practices in another. The syntax may vary but the underlying principles are closely related and the syntax is generally recognizable.

In the latest TIOBE index of programming language popularity (March 2014 as of this writing), PHP has held fairly steady at a very respectable 6th place for over a decade. That's no mean feat. Look up a little bit higher on that list, though, and notice a few familiar faces: Java sits at 2nd place, C++ at 4th, and C# at 5th.

There are a lot of Java and C# developers out there. The corporate world especially is full of them. That's millions (yes, millions) of developers who may not know PHP, but already know the same underlying concepts behind modern, object-oriented PHP. If they need to learn PHP, they can.

That's millions (yes, millions) of developers who may not know Drupal but if they need to learn it, they can.

Conversely, what do you think happened when we showed our C# developer hooks? He recoiled. Physically.

Magic naming of language syntax is not a common practice in the Java/C++/C#/PHP family of languages. To developers coming in from other family languages hooks and big nested arrays are the least-familiar parts of the code base. Those are, in fact, the hardest to learn for the overwhelming majority of the world that is not already a Drupal developer. That's why there has been considerable effort to try and migrate away from naked data structures to industry standard language techniques: It makes Drupal easier to learn in the long run, as well as the other benefits of common patterns and easier modifiability. Hooks and arrays-of-doom haven't gone away yet, but in the long run their days are numbered.

Drupal 8 won't just be easier to learn for existing PHP developers. It will be easier to learn for existing developers, period.

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Verbosity: Migrating multilingual data into Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2014/04/11 - 8:19pm

First thing, have a D6 site with multilingual things ready to go! This node has a file attached (see end of post) with a copy of D6 with some translated nodes and site information (see settings.php file settings to translate these variables). The file is a drush archive.

D6 "Requirements" at this time:

  • It must have CCK installed (2014-04-11)
  • Recommended to install in the non-English language if you wish to download the translations automatically (this isn't working in the UI yet 2014-04-11). You can also go download the translations manually later.
Setting up D8

Currently we do not work from the main branch as there are significant changes happening in this area of Drupal 8. Some things may be broken. You have been warned! Please test and update issue summaries where appropriate.

  • Clone the IMP migration sandbox and install Drupal 8 https://drupal.org/sandbox/chx/2105305
  • Enable migrate, migrate_drupal, content_translation, configuration_translation, locale/"Interface Translation", language (these last two are installed by default if you did not install in English)
  • Enable English as a language
  • Get the patch so you can bind to a second database in D8 https://drupal.org/node/2181775
  • Create a manifest.yml file in the root
Migration Mappings

Put this file int he root of your D8 site. If you did migrations to D7 with the latest versions of migrate and d2d, this file similar to your migrate.inc file registration array (but in a completely new format).

manifest.yml

# nodes
- d6_user_role
#- d6_user (not working yet - "does not meet requirements" 2014-04-11)
- d6_language_types # Patch needed 2014-04-11 https://drupal.org/node/2225293
- d6_language_negotiation # needs above patch
- d6_language # Patches needed 2014-04-11 https://drupal.org/node/2166875 and https://drupal.org/node/2234623

- d6_filter_format

- d6_node_type
- d6_node_settings # gets story content type
- d6_node:*
- d6_node_body_field

- d6_view_modes

You can find the complete list of migrations at core/modules/migrate_drupal/migrate.config.yml some (like d6_user are not yet working 2014-04-11).

Running the Migration

Then, on the command line, run your manifest file. I used a D6 database with no password because of the bug mentioned above.

drush migrate-manifest mysql://d6@localhost/d6 manifest.yml

You will need the latest Drush if you want support D8! A UI-based workflow is being developed here: https://drupal.org/node/2200379

Rolling Back

This does not exist yet, but if you are familiar with doing this manually in D7 the process is the same:

Use the UI to delete the affected things (in this example, delete your nodes)
Clear the database table that stores the migration info for the specific migration: mysql> delete from migrate_map_d6_node;

Other howtos

Writing D6 to D8 entity migrations - https://groups.drupal.org/node/387488
How to test Drupal 6 to Drupal 8 migrations - https://groups.drupal.org/node/398588
eliza411 - http://dspeak.com/fldc14/dothis.html

More information on Migrate in Core / IMP

You can follow the initiative at groups.drupal.org/imp.

AttachmentSize Drupal 6 drush archive with translated nodes and site information1.72 MB Category: D8MIDrupal 8Drupal ArticlesDrupal Planet
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Janez Urevc: You should come to DC Alpe-Adria (really!)

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2014/04/11 - 5:56pm

If you came this far you probably liked this video just as much as I did :). You should really consider coming to Portorož in May to attend DC Alpe-Adria. We will have 2 days of great sessions, BoFs and sprints + 2 more day of extended sprints where we're going to focus on D8 and making it rock!

Portorož is also a great destination for children and families so you could bring your significant others and/or families with you and extend Drupal camp into an unforgettable vacation.

Interested? Of course you are! Find out more at drupalalpeadria.org.

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Phase2: An Open Source PartnerShip A Year In The Making

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2014/04/11 - 3:52pm

It was one year ago that our own Steven Merrill, Director of Engineering at Phase2, found himself at the RedHat Summit, when he stopped in front of the OpenShift booth. OpenShift is an open-source Platform As A Service (PaaS) solution that offers developers a cloud application platform with a choice of programming languages, frameworks and application lifecycle tools to build and run their applications. The platform provides built-in support for Node.js, Ruby, Python, PHP, Perl, and Java, as well as MySQL, PostgreSQL, and MongoDB. Developers can also add their own languages.

Right away Steven was intrigued by OpenShift since it’s the only PaaS that’s open source (OpenShift Origin,) and that also has a Red Hat-supported behind-the-firewall install (OpenShift Enterprise) and a public PaaS (OpenShift Online.) As Phase2’s DevOps luminary and frequent contributor to the Drupal community, Steven quickly acquainted himself with the OpenShift team and started to explore the possibility of spinning up OpenShift environments for Drupal. By the end of RedHat Summit 2013, Steven had laid the groundwork for a Drupal 8 cartridge and had created an updated PHP 5.4 cartridge for OpenShift.

Steven’s introduction to OpenShift at the RedHat Summit ignited excitement about diversifying our deployment optimization services here at Phase2. The possibility of creating quickstart packages for our Drupal distributions on OpenShift was especially attractive to us. Soon after the RedHat Summit, the Drupal 8 quickstart cartridge was committed to OpenShift, allowing developers to quickly and safely spin up a Drupal 8 environment to test and develop on.

Throughout the past year, our relationship with OpenShift strengthened as we worked together at DrupalCon Portland and DrupalCon Prague to develop Drupal compatibility with OpenShift. To our clients’ delight, we began implementing OpenShift into our deployment services. One of our recent clients, a Fortune 500 publishing company, was overjoyed to find that the deployment process we created for them using Openshift allowed them to cut onboarding time for new developers from an entire month to as little as a week.

Steven and Diane Mueller, the OpenShift community manager, recently co-hosted an OpenShift for Drupal training at NYC Camp. The training gave Drupal developers the tools and knowledge they need to quickly develop, host, and scale applications in an open source cloud environment.  Next week we will be once again heading to RedHat Summit, one year later, exhibiting at the summit as an Advanced OpenShift partner.

Our partnership with OpenShift is a classic open source story: equally committed to open source solutions, Phase2 and OpenShift have teamed up to develop mutually beneficial service capabilities for our clients. We look forward to continuing our close relationship with OpenShift and announcing several more exciting developments and collaborative projects launching in the near future. Stay tuned – there are big things coming for Drupal on OpenShift, the cloud, and Phase2’s deployment services.

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Code Karate: Drupal Site Map Module

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2014/04/11 - 2:19pm
Episode Number: 143

The Drupal Site Map module can be used to provide you Drupal website visitors with a high level overview of the content on your Drupal 7 site.

Tags: DrupalContribDrupal 7Site BuildingDrupal PlanetSEO
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Acquia: How to reliably test sandbox projects using the drupal.org testbot locally

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2014/04/11 - 10:15am

During Drupal Dev Days in Hungary, there were many sprints that took place. You can see the amazing footage of what went on there in this nice movie, but that is not what we are going to discuss now!

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Morten.dk: Drupal8 theme debug

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2014/04/11 - 9:22am

I would lie (and would i lie to you ?) if it say that im not extremely excited about theming in Drupal8. One the bigger painpoints in Drupal theming is figuring out where the markup is generated from. In Drupal8 we have build that directly in, i did a little screencast of it & damn its awesome.

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Mediacurrent: Meet Alex McCabe

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/04/10 - 10:29pm


1. So Alex, what's your role at Mediacurrent, both internally and client-related?

 My official title is Drupal Developer. I do site building work, custom module development, sometimes handle deployments, and an occasional bit of light theme work. I also participate in client meetings to provide technical insight where necessary.

2. We're so glad to have you!  Give us an idea of what professional path brought you here.

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Propeople Blog: Drupal Developer Days 2014

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/04/10 - 10:10pm

I recently had the good fortune of being a part of Drupal Developer Days 2014 in Szeged  - my first Dev Days! It was a really amazing mix of experiences for me, from visiting Hungary for the first time to meeting lots of new people and, of course, lots of Drupal.

Szeged is a beautiful city in Southern Hungary that is no stranger to Drupal (the city hosted DrupalCon Europe 2008), and was a pleasure to visit. If you’re not familiar with Drupal Developer Days, it is an event focused on bringing the Drupal community together to work on the development of the Drupal project. The event presents a great opportunity for some of the leading Drupal experts and developers to work on, and learn about, Drupal 8 in depth before it’s widely released. Dev Days featured code sprints, workshops, sessions, BoFs, after parties and was overall a great time.

Since I’m not a quite Drupal 8 ninja (yet!), I was eager to find opportunities where I could help and learn at the same time. With this in mind, I decided to pick two sprints to add to my schedule: the Drupal.org sprint and the Search API migration sprint.  

Drupal.org Sprint

I knew Drupal user @tvn before the event and had some experience with Drupal.org stuff, so I figured this sprint would heat up to be llots of fun. We started with 89 open issues and 5-6 people in our team. Tasks ranged from “the tiny ones” (https://drupal.org/node/2046683) to “the big problems” (https://drupal.org/node/2130537). But is anything really a problem if you have @tvn, @jthorson, and @jessebeach around? These guys spent a week and closed nearly 50 issues! Yep, some of them are still in review or RBTC, but the majority are resolved. You can find more info here.

Search API Migration Sprint

If you’re familiar with Drupal, you probably know the ApacheSolr and Search API modules and their maintainers: @nick_vh and @drunken_monkey. I was lucky to have a chance to be here with them and merge these two monsters into one single pretty baby! The code is currently inside an external sandbox now (https://drupal.org/sandbox/daeron/2091893) but will be released as a new version of Search API module soon! It was here where I spent most of my days in Szeged, and was in the great company of some talented geeks: @mollux, @aspilicious, @Andrew_l, @Andre-B and others. Before Szeged Dev Days, SearchAPI 8.x was almost clean repo, but now you can already come and try the feature contrib search solution for Drupal 8. We have migrated almost all the code from 7.x version - most of it is already ported to new standards, and some of it has been covered with web and unit tests.

Szeged Drupal Dev Days was awesome, and a great opportunity to learn more about Drupal 8. I would definitely recommend attending any upcoming events like this. Where else can you meet such amazing teams, learn lots of new  stuff about Drupal 8, phpunit, symfony, etc. and feel the spirit of Open Source?

See you there!

 

Tags: DrupalDrupal Developer DaysDrupal eventsCheck this option to include this post in Planet Drupal aggregator: planetTopics: Community & Events
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Chapter Three: Pick on Your Performance Issues

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/04/10 - 7:53pm

Performance should be in the mind of every Drupal developer and site builder as they are building a site. But let's be honest, while getting everything to just plain work and look good speed doesn't always get to hold that #1 spot in your mind.

Freeing up brain energy from potential performance issues is not necessarily a bad thing. Predicting which issues will have the biggest impact once a site launches is a task best left to wizards and sages. The best way to analyze and then tackle a site's performance issues is with data from the live production site. There are plenty of tools to help simulate that data, but nothing replaces good hard production data.

Luckily Views Cache Bully has come to the rescue of distracted developers everywhere. Set it, forget it and rest easy knowing that you now have one less reason for why your site might be crawling.

Why views caching?

Most the views on your site display the exact same information over and over, they just display it to different users. I know, I know you are a prolific blog writer, but do you really publish a new post every 5 minutes?

If you are feeling conservative, set the defaults to a short value and keep bumping them up as you come to realize how little these things change. Even if you only serve the cached results to five users that means five less trips through PHP and the database for those visitors.

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AGLOBALWAY: Death to Lorem Ipsum! Content First!

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/04/10 - 7:52pm
Have you ever build a beautifully designed responsive website? You followed mobile first design principles and carefully analyzed the small screen to big screen transition.  It scales magically and works beautifully on IE8 and IE10 at the same time.  All the bugs have been squashed.   Now, it is ready for the client to enter the content.  HOLD on!  What?  Yes, I said it.   You are ready for the client to enter the content.  I suspect you are going to guess what happens next, the beautifully design website with placeholder text buckles.   Lorem Ipsum brings you down.   Of course this never happens to you.     Reality of how the client is actually is going to use the site emerges.   You thought they would give you nice uniform images.  That beautiful pinterest style blog listing now looks like malformed swiss cheese.  Who knew!  The client loves to speak in 100 character bursts that make Twitter look wordy.  Your article listing looks sparse.  Although it may be tempting to blame the client for their writing style or lacking the appropriate reverence for your beautiful design, but that would be a big mistake.  It is time to start thinking about designing websites around content first.     As developers, recognize that the longer it takes to get real content into the system the more risk you are taking on.  As clients, bringing your content to the developer at the start of the project you will more likely have a website that works well for you.  Not only it is important to have a sense of the content, knowing what the bare bones minimum and high priority content can help you small screen design.   When you are doing a content review think of the following:  
  • What business message are you trying to convey?
  • What languages are you using?
  • Are there any regulations that you have to abide by?
  • How quickly can the content be created?
  • Who is creating the content?
  These questions can help you determine your minimal viable content (MVC).  The faster you can create your MVC and get into your developments hands the more successful your responsive multi-platform website will be.  Don’t let lorem ipsum bring you down.   Tags: responsivemobile firstcontent firstwebmutli-platformdrupal planet
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Acquia: DrupalCon Training with the Acquia team! UX and Security

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/04/10 - 4:02pm

The Acquia team is getting ready for DrupalCon Austin. We're excited about the official announcement of training at DrupalCon which is held on the Monday before the conference on Monday, June 2. We have two courses on offer which we think you'll love. One will get you started evaluating your designs with users, and how to conduct usability testing. One will help ensure your site or application is secure which is increasingly important for sites of all sizes.

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Code Karate: Responsive Navigation Module

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/04/10 - 2:22pm
Episode Number: 142

In this episode of the Daily Dose of Drupal we go over the Responsive Navigation module. This module can be used to make your Drupal menu "responsive" so that it displays nicely on mobile and tablet devices. If you are trying to build a responsive Drupal website or a responsive Drupal theme, this module can help.

Tags: DrupalContribDrupal 7Drupal PlanetUI/DesignResponsive Design
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Blair Wadman: Top 10 Drush commands - follow up

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/04/10 - 1:54pm

I recently posted my top 10 Drush commands. In the blog post comments, over email and Twitter, a bunch of people let me know their top commands and tips. This was such great feedback, I decided to write up the list as another post. Here is the top 10 Drush commands from the fine folk who contributed.

Tags: DrushPlanet Drupal
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Drupal Association News: Building the Future of Drupal

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2014/04/10 - 12:18am

If Drupal adoption is going to increase, we’ll need to grow the community— and that means continuing to bring developers, web designers, and digital experts into the Drupal fold. For the finale of our series on Drupal training options, we spoke to several of the many experts in Drupal training, and wanted to share their thoughts with the community.

When it comes to increasing the amount of Drupal talent in the market, there are more options to learn the platform than ever before.

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