clemens-tolboom pushed to 8.x at build2be/drupal-rest-test

On github - Tue, 2015/01/13 - 6:15pm
Jan 13, 2015 clemens-tolboom pushed to 8.x at build2be/drupal-rest-test

OpenLucius: Drupal Grants, what to do with this node access system?

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2015/01/13 - 5:48pm
Viewing, editing and deleting pages in Drupal

When you have some experience with Drupal it will be clear that you can set your rights for content management in the permission table (/admin/people/permissions).

Check the appropriate permissions and everyone will get the required rights to view, add, edit or delete content. In other words the so-called CRUD actions: Create, Read, Update, Delete.

So far so good.

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ERPAL: Looking back on 2014 with Drupal business apps

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2015/01/13 - 4:30pm

The year 2014 was entirely about flexible and open business applications based on Drupal - and we’ll continue to follow this vision in 2015.
In 2014 we staffed up our ERPAL team and won strategic clients who gave us feedback and helped us continue to finance our open source development. This positive resonance provides confirmation that Drupal can become an ever-larger part of the open source business application market.
One of the ERPAL Platform projects of 2014 that we’re very proud of was presented in a featured webinar on open integration with Drupal commerce. The ERPAL Platform based foam creator gives an industrial company the means to let its clients construct and order individually manufactured products – all directly online. The orders are sent to the manufacturing department and production starts. Because the application is fully integrated with the company’s workflow and IT infrastructure, no manual data transfer is needed and the efficiency of the whole sales-to-production process has increased by more than 75%. This unique use case shows the power of Drupal extended well beyond content sites.

Whereas other open source business apps like Odoo focus solely on broadening the palette of business apps available for ERP systems, ERPAL comes from the other direction. We use Drupal as a highly flexible and stable application framework that helps you build any kind of web application at all - and Drupal can do this with almost no coding, just by configuring. Using this strategy we introduced Drupal to some businesses that hadn’t even heard of Drupal. And now that they see its power and flexibility, they wouldn’t want to go without it anymore.
With ERPAL Platform, which we released in 2014, we provide Drupal developers and site builders with a free Drupal distribution for building highly flexible business applications and e-commerce businesses in a Drupal box. It integrates many Drupal modules like Drupal Commerce and Rules, which are known to leverage flexibility. With the help of the Drupal community we implemented an architecture that covers contact management and all components of the sales process such as quotes, orders and invoices. As Drupal became more open, providing web service for all entities in Drupal 8, we implemented the architecture of ERPAL to integrate with other services. Together with a closed beta customer test pool, we are running ERPAL Platform as a fully-integrated agency platform, automating integration tasks between Jira, Mite, Trello, Redmine and toggle. It helps save time in administration and automates billing and controlling processes in project-based business. Thanks to everyone who joined our ERPAL Platform integration survey. This survey is still open and we are looking forward to even more feedback to help us increase our number of beta testers.

Because in 2014 we were deploying more than 25 Drupal-based business apps and always had Drupalgeddon in mind, we decided to go public with our technology for Drupal update automation, which we previously had used only internally for our clients. Drop Guard lets Drupal users and agencies automate Drupal security updates immediately after a new security update release. If you’re interested in further details, workflows and technology, read more in our blog post about how since 2012 we’ve automated Drupal security updates with ERPAL: you can too!

All in all, 2014 was an amazing year for ERPAL and we saw that there’s a market for open source business applications. We’re looking forward to contributing even more code, know-how, webinars and sessions to the Drupal community in 2015.

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Drupalize.Me: Changes in the Form API in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2015/01/13 - 3:13pm

In my previous post, I documented the first of my Adventures in Porting a D7 Form Module to Drupal 8. In that article, I documented how I used the Drupal Module Upgrader to convert my Drupal 7 module, Form Fun, to Drupal 8 and what I learned along the way about how Routes and Controllers replaced hook_menu, and what I gleaned from change records about other API changes. This article is a continuation of that post, so you might want to pop over and give it a read so that you're up to speed with what we're doing here.

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DrupalOnWindows: Setting up Code Syntax Higlighting with Drupal

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2015/01/13 - 7:00am

While setting up (still in progres..) this website we found the need to enable easy Code Highlighting to be done through our WYSIWYG editor of choice: CKeditor. What looked like a 30 minute task, ended up in a more than 3 hour adventure. Let's see what happened.

Language English
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Liran Tal's Enginx: Drupal Performance Tip – be humble on hook_init()

Planet Drupal - Mon, 2015/01/12 - 5:06pm
This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Drupal Performance Tips

In the spirit of the computer video game Doom and its skill levels, we’ll review a few ways you can improve  your Drupal speed performance     and optimize for better results and server response time. These tips that we’ll cover may be at times specific to Drupal 6 versions, although     you can always learn the best practices from these examples and apply them on your own code base.

Doom skill levels: (easiest first)

1. I’m too young to die

2. Hey, not too rough

3. Hurt me plenty

4. Ultra-violence

5. Nightmare!

  This post is rated “I’m too young too die” difficulty level.

 

Drupal is known for its plethora of hooks, and their use is abundant through-out any Drupal modules to plug into the way that Drupal works. That’s fine, though once you’ve decided you’re moving on with Drupal as your live web application/website and you’re using modules from the eco-system, that is when you need to spend some more time reviewing modules a little bit closer than just their download counts or issues on drupal.org

hook_init() runs on every page load. Imagine you’re having a few modules implementing this hook, then you already have impact on your server response time performance for every page access in Drupal. Maybe those modules have a very slight overhead there, maybe that’s part of what they do, and that’s fine, but it may at times benefit you to review and investigate if the code there, that maybe your team added too, is better being re-factored to some other place and not on every page load.

There is another perspective for it of course, maybe things do need to take place on every page load, but their implementation in the code might be faulty. Imagine you’re doing some expensive IO on every page load, like calling an API, or querying a heavy table. Maybe you can re-factor to cache this information?

 

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The post Drupal Performance Tip – be humble on hook_init() appeared first on Liran Tal's Enginx.

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Evolving Web: Parallelized web scraping using RollingCurl

Planet Drupal - Mon, 2015/01/12 - 4:35pm

The web is full of information! Your web sites probably already use many APIs for maps, Twitter, IP geolocation, and more. But what about data that's on the web, but doesn't have a readily available API?

read more
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Yuriy Gerasimov: Centralize your logs with logstash (getting started guide)

Planet Drupal - Mon, 2015/01/12 - 1:51pm

Logstash is a great tool to centralize logs in your environment. For example we have several drupal webheads that write logs into syslog. It would be really nice to see those logs somewhere centrally to find out about your system's health status and debug potential problems.

In this article I would like to show how easy to start using logstash for local development.

First of all in order to run logstash you need to follow instructions http://logstash.net/docs/1.4.2/tutorials/getting-started-with-logstash.

Logstash has following concepts:

  • inputs -- where we grab logs from. This can be files on local files system, records of database table, redis and many more.
  • codecs -- way you can serialize/unserialize you data. Think about it as json decode when you get records or running json encode when you are saving log message.
  • filters -- instruments to filter particular log records we want to process. Example -- syslog has many records but we want to extract only drupal related.
  • outputs -- where we are passing our processed log records. It can be a file (multiple different formats), stdout or what is most interesting elastic search

Tricky part comes when you need to install Elastic Search to store your logs and Kibana to view them. There is very nice shortcut for development purposes -- to use already built docker image for that.

I have found very handy to use https://registry.hub.docker.com/u/sebp/elk/ image.

So you need docker to be installed (http://docs.docker.com/installation/ubuntulinux/). Then you import docker image and run it.

sudo docker pull sebp/elk sudo docker run -p 5601:5601 -p 9200:9200 -p 5000:5000 -it --name elk sebp/elk

Now we have docker image working plus it has port forwarding to our localhost.

In order to send your logstash logs to elastic search you need to use elasticsearch output. Here is logstash configuration file example that can be run for testing.

input { stdin { } } output { stdout { codec => rubydebug } elasticsearch { host => "localhost" port => "9200" protocol => "http" } }

Now when you run logstash and enter couple of messages they will be fed to elasticsearch. Now you can open http://localhost:5601/ to see kibana in action.

Next step would be to set up your own rules of extracting drupal (or any other type) logs and pushing them to elastic search. But this is very individual task that is out of the scope of this guide.

Tags: drupaldrupal planetlogstash
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Paul Rowell: Drupal fields; improving select lists

Planet Drupal - Sun, 2015/01/11 - 9:39pm

Everyone knows what a select list is, what it looks like and how it works. But that doesn't mean it can't get better, here a few modules that can be used to improve the experience for users when selecting items.

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Drupal Camp NJ 2015: Drupal 8 core critical issues sprint to coincide with camp

Planet Drupal - Sun, 2015/01/11 - 5:53pm

The Central NJ Drupal Meetup has received one of the first grants from the new Drupal Association Drupal 8 Accelerate program. The Sprint will take place from January 29 to Febrary 1. For more details see https://groups.drupal.org/node/453848 

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DrupalOnWindows: Drupal on IIS or Apache

Planet Drupal - Sun, 2015/01/11 - 10:38am

In this article I will try to find out if there is any performance lead in running Drupal on IIS over Apache. I will not run any benchmarks on my own, just analyze what I could find about this surfing the web. Type "iis vs apache drupal" in Google and this is what I found.

The links

Drupal Performance on IIS7 vs Apache

Date: Mid 2012

Language English
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clemens-tolboom commented on pull request clue/graph#96

On github - Sat, 2015/01/10 - 1:43pm
Jan 10, 2015 clemens-tolboom commented on pull request clue/graph#96

Hope to find time to revive my PR but afraid not :(

clemens-tolboom commented on pull request clue/graph#115

On github - Sat, 2015/01/10 - 1:40pm
Jan 10, 2015 clemens-tolboom commented on pull request clue/graph#115

Thanks