Acquia Developer Center Blog: Drupal 8 Module of the Week - Webform (formerly known as YAML Form)

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2017/03/07 - 4:45pm

This week: The Webform Module // Drupal 8 has more and more features available practically every day. Alongside module migrations and new projects, the Drupal community’s latest major release also offers new ways of solving common problems. Some functionality has moved to Drupal core and new modules have taken up the torch along the way. In this series, the Acquia Developer Center is profiling useful solutions--modules, themes, distros, and more--available for Drupal 8.

Tags: acquia drupal planetwebformform buildersurveyYAML
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InternetDevels: Drupal modules: custom-made vs ready-made

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2017/03/07 - 2:46pm

Previously we have brought to your attention the main types of Drupal developers.
One of them is the module developer. Today we are going to focus on the two main types of
modules these developers work on. Read further to learn the differences and the pros
and cons of both to decide what modules to implement on your web resource.

Read more
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InternetDevels: Drupal modules: custom-made vs ready-made

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2017/03/07 - 2:46pm

Previously we have brought to your attention the main types of Drupal developers.
One of them is module developer. Today we are going to focus on the two main
types of modules, this type of developers is working on. Read further to know the
differences, the pros and cons of both to decide what modules to implement on your
web resource.

Read more
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MD Systems blog: Drupal 8 security features: XSS

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2017/03/07 - 2:10pm
Recently, we had to create a security report for one of our clients about their Drupal 8 project. We described how Drupal 8 protects against most common vulnerabilities and added some project specific tests to secure as good as possible that it cannot be attacked. This resulted in a document that we thought is worth to be transferred into a series of blog posts.
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ComputerMinds.co.uk: Drupal as a Server - Introduction

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2017/03/07 - 2:00pm

This post is the first in a series about getting Drupal to run as a persistent server, responding to requests without bootstrapping each and every time.

This is how many other application frameworks and languages run: nodejs, Rails etc.

In those systems you start some instances of your application and then they do whatever bootstrapping they need to do and then they enter an endless loop waiting for requests.

I recently upgraded our internally hosted Redmine server to run on Ruby 2.3 and during that upgrade took a look at our NewRelic monitoring for the application. Some of the page requests had an average response time of 8ms. These were page requests for logged in users. That would be amazing performance for a Drupal page.

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Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: Drupal Logos in the Shapes of Animals

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2017/03/07 - 10:19am
We have to admit that it's really fun collecting and presenting you various types of Druplicons. You realize that imagination actually has no limits. After already exploring Humans and Superhumans and Fruits and Vegetables, it's time to present you Drupal Logos in the shapes of Animals. Druplicon in the shape of a Bee (NW Drupal User Group)     Very similar to this bee (DrupalCamp Charlotte 2014)     Druplicon in the shape of a Bear (Drupal Camp Asheville 2016)     Druplicon in the shape of a Dolphin (Drupal Camp Victoria 2009)     Druplicon in the shape of a Fish (Drupalcon Szeged… READ MORE
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Capgemini Engineering: DrupalCamp London experience

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2017/03/07 - 1:00am

This weekend’s DrupalCamp London wasn’t my first Drupal event at all, I’ve been to 3 DrupalCon Europe, 4 DrupalCamp Dublin, and a few other DrupalCamps in Ireland and lots of meetups, but in this case I experienced a lot of ‘first times’ that I want to share.

Sponsor perspective

This was the first time I’d attended a Drupal event representing a sponsor organisation, and as a result the way I experienced it was completely different.

Firstly, you focus more on your company’s goals, rather than your personal aims. In this case I was helping Capgemini UK to engage and recruit people for our open positions. This allowed me to socialise more and try to connect with people. We also had T-shirts so it was easier to attract people if you have something free for them. I was also able to have conversations with other sponsors to see why did they sponsor the event, some were also recruiting, but most of them were selling their solutions to prospective clients, Drupal developers and agencies.

The best of this experience was the people I found in other companies and the attendees approaching us for a T-shirt or a job opportunity.

New member of Capgemini UK perspective

As a new joiner in the Capgemini UK Drupal team I attended this event when I wasn’t even a month old in the company, and I am glad I could attend this event at such short notice in my new position, I think this tells a lot about the focus on training and career development Capgemini has and how much they care about Drupal.

As a new employee of the company this event allowed me to meet more colleagues from different departments or teams and meet them in a non-working environment. Again the best of this experience was the people I met and the relations I made.

New member of the local Drupal Community perspective

I joined Capgemini from Ireland, so I was also new to the London Drupal community, and the DrupalCamp gave me the opportunity to connect and create relationships with other members of the Drupal community. Of course they were busy organising this great event, but I was able to contact some of the members, and I have to say they were very friendly when I approached any of the crew or other local members attending the event. I am very happy to have met some friendly people and I am committed to help and volunteer my time in future events, so this was a very good starting point. And again the best were the people I met.

Non-session perspective

As I had other duties I couldn’t attend all sessions. But I was able to attend some sessions and the Keynotes, with special mention to the Saturday keynote from Matt Glaman, it was very motivational and made me think anyone could evolve as a developer if they try and search the resources to get the knowledge. And the closing keynote from Danese Cooper was very inspirational as well about what Open Source is and what should be, and that we, the developers, have the power to make it happen. And we could also enjoy Malcom Young’s presentation about Code Reviews.

Conclusion

Closing this article I would like to come back to the best part of the DrupalCamp for me this year, which was the people. They are always the best part of the social events. I was able to catch up with old friends from Ireland, engage with people considering a position at Capgemini and introduce myself to the London Drupal community, so overall I am very happy with this DrupalCamp London and I will be happy to return next year. In the meantime I will be attending some Drupal meetups and trying to get involve in the community, so don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any question or you need my help.

DrupalCamp London experience was originally published by Capgemini at Capgemini Engineering on March 07, 2017.

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Drupal CMS Guides at Daymuse Studios: Customizable Products with Drupal Commerce Module Guide

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2017/03/07 - 12:36am

As part of our ongoing Drupal Commerce module walkthrough, I'm going to show you how to create custom Products. The Commerce Custom Products module allows the creation of custom line items on Products for customer input. Custom line items for Products are essential when the customer must define something about the Product that they're adding to the cart. A few examples of how you may use Commerce Customizable Products includes:

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ActiveLAMP: Composer FTW! RIP Drush Make?

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2017/03/07 - 12:30am

In the modern world of web / application development, using package managers to pull in dependencies has become a de-facto standard. In fact, if you are developing enterprise software and you aren’t leveraging package managers I would go as far to say that you are doing it wrong (I’ll elaborate on this point later in the post).

Read more...
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Drupal Association blog: It's Time To Vote - Community Elections

Planet Drupal - Mon, 2017/03/06 - 11:55pm

Voting is now open for the 2017 At-Large Board positions for the Drupal Association!  If you haven't yet, check out the candidate profiles including their short videos found on the profile pages. Get to know your candidates, and then get ready vote.

Cast Your Vote!

How does voting work? Voting is open to all individuals who have a Drupal.org account by the time nominations open and who have logged in at least once in the past year.

To vote, you will rank candidates in order of your preference (1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.). The results will be calculated using an "instant runoff" method. For an accessible explanation of how instant runoff vote tabulation works, see videos linked in this discussion.

Elections will be held from 6 March, 2017 through 18 March, 2017. During this period, you can review and comment on the candidate profiles.

Have questions? Please contact me: Megan Sanicki

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Drupal Modules: The One Percent: Drupal Modules: The One Percent — Realistic Dummy Content (video tutorial)

Planet Drupal - Mon, 2017/03/06 - 11:22pm
Drupal Modules: The One Percent — Realistic Dummy Content (video tutorial) NonProfit Mon, 03/06/2017 - 16:22 Episode 22

Here is where we bring awareness to Drupal modules running on less than 1% of reporting sites. Today we'll consider at Realistic Dummy Content, a module which rewrites node titles and replaces Devel's auto-generated placeholder images and profile pictures with freely licensed stock photos or portraits.

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Lullabot: HTTPS Everywhere: Deep Dive Into Making the Switch

Planet Drupal - Mon, 2017/03/06 - 6:46pm

HTTPS Everywhere: Deep Dive Into Making the Switch

In the previous articles, HTTPS Everywhere: Security is Not Just for Banks and HTTPS Everywhere: Quick Start With CloudFlare, I talked about why it’s important to serve even small websites using the secure HTTPS protocol, and provided a quick and easy how-to for sites where you don’t control the server. This article is going to provide a deep dive into SSL terminology and options. Even if you are offloading the work to a service like Cloudflare, it’s good to understand what’s going on behind the scenes. And if you have more control over the server you’ll need a basic understanding of what you need to accomplish and how to go about it.

At a high level, there are a few steps required to set up a website to be served securely over HTTPS:

  1. Decide what type of certificate to use.
  2. Install a signed certificate on the server.
  3. Configure the server to use SSL.
  4. Review your site for mixed content and other validation issues.
  5. Redirect all traffic to HTTPS.
  6. Monitor the certificate expiration date and renew it when it expires.

Your options are dependent on the type of certificate you want and your level of control over the website. If you self-host, you have unlimited choices, but you’ll have to do the work yourself. If you are using a shared host service, you’ll have to see what SSL options your host offers and how they recommend setting it up. Another option is to set up SSL on a proxy service like the Cloudflare CDN, which stands between your website and the rest of the web.

I’m going to go through these steps in detail.

Decide Which Certificate to Use

Every distinct domain needs certificates, so if you are serving content at www.example.com and blog.example.com, both domains need to be certified. Certificates are provided by a Certificate Authority (CA). There are numerous CAs that will sell you a certificate, including DigiCert, VeriSign, GlobalSign, and Comodo. There are also CAs that provide free SSL certificates, like LetsEncrypt.

Validation Levels There are several certificate validation levels available.

Domain Validation (DV) degree certificate indicates that the applicant has control over the specified DNS domain. DV certificates do not assure that any particular legal entity is connected to the certificate, even if the domain name may imply that. The name of the organization will not appear next to the lock in the browser since the controlling organization is not validated. DV certificates are relatively inexpensive, or even free. It’s a low level of authentication but provides assurance that the user is not on a spoofed copy of a legitimate site.

Organization Validation (OV) OV certificates verify that the applicant is a legitimate business. Before issuing the SSL certificate, the CA performs a rigorous validation procedure, including checking the applicant's business credentials (such as the Articles of Incorporation) and verifying the accuracy of its physical and Web addresses.

Extended Validation (EV) Extended Validation certificates are the newest type of certificate. They provide more validation than the OV validation level and adhere to industry-wide certification guidelines established by leading Web browser vendors and Certificate Authorities. To clarify the degree of validation, the name of the verified legal identity is displayed in the browser, in green, next to the lock. EV certificates are more expensive than DV or OV certificates because of the extra work they require from the CA. EV certificates convey more trust than the other alternatives, so are appropriate for financial and commerce sites, but they are useful on any site where trust is important.

Certificate Types

In addition to the validation levels, there are several types of certificates available.

Single Domain Certificate An individual certificate is issued for a single domain. It can be either DV, OV or EV.

Wildcard Certificate A wildcard certificate will automatically secure any sub-domains that a business adds in the future. They also reduce the number of certificates that need to be tracked. A wildcard domain would be something like *.example.com, which would include www.example.com, blog.example.com, help.example.com, etc. Wildcards work only with DV and OV certificates. EV certificates cannot be provided as wildcard certificates, since every domain must be specifically identified in an EV certificate.

Multi-Domain Subject Alternative Name (SAN) A multi-domain SAN certificate secures multiple domain names on a single certificate. Unlike a wildcard certificate, the domain names can be totally unrelated. It can be used by services like Cloudflare that combine a number of domains into a single certificate. All domains are covered by the same certificate, so they have the same level of credentials. A SAN certificate is often used to provide multiple domains with DV level certification, but EV SAN certificates are also available.

Install a Signed Certificate

The process of installing a SSL certificate is initiated on the server where the website is hosted by creating a 2048-bit RSA public/private key pair, then generating a Certificate Signing Request (CSR). The CSR is a block of encoded text that contains information that will be included in the certificate, like the organization name and location, along with the server’s public key. The CA then uses the CSR and the public key to create a signed SSL certificate, or a Certificate Chain. A certificate chain consists of multiple certificates where each certificate vouches for the next. This signed certificate or certificate chain is then installed on the original server. The public key is used to encrypt messages, and they can only be decrypted with the corresponding private key, making it possible for the user and the website to communicate privately with each other.

Obviously, this process is something that only works if you have shell access or a control panel UI to the server. If your site is hosted by a third party, it will be up to the host to determine, how, if at all, they will allow their hosted sites to be served over HTTPS. Most major hosts offer HTTPS, but specific instructions and procedures vary from host to host.

As an alternative, there are services, like Cloudflare, that provide HTTPS for any site, no matter where it is hosted. I discussed this in more detail in my previous article, HTTPS Everywhere: Quick Start With CloudFlare.

Configure the Server to Use SSL

The next step is to make sure the website server is configured to use SSL. If a third party manages your servers, like a shared host or CDN, this is handled by the third party and you don’t need to do anything other than determine that it is being handled correctly. If you are managing your own server, you might find Mozilla's handy configuration generator and documentation about Server Side TLS useful.

One important consideration is that the server and its keys should be configured for PFS, an abbreviation for either Perfect Forward Security or Perfect Forward Secrecy. Prior to the implementation of PFS, an attacker could record encrypted traffic over time and store it. If they got access to the private key later, they could then decrypt all that historic data with the private key. Security around the private key might be relaxed once the certificate expires, so this is a genuine issue. PFS ensures that even if the private key gets disclosed later, it can’t be used to decrypt prior encrypted traffic. An example of why this is important is the Heartbleed bug, where PFS would have prevented some of the damage caused by Heartbleed. If you’re using a third-party service for SSL, be sure it uses PFS. Cloudflare does, for instance.

Normally SSL certificates have a one-to-one relationship to the IP address of their domains. Server Name Indication (SNI) is an extension of TLS that provides a way to manage multiple certificates on the same IP address. SNI-compatible browsers (most modern browsers are SNI-compatible) can communicate with the server to retrieve the correct certificate for the domain they are trying to reach, which allows multiple HTTPS sites to be served from a single IP address.

Test the server’s configuration with Qualys' handy SSL Server Test. You can use this test even on servers you don’t control! It will run a battery of tests and give the server a security score for any HTTPS domain.

Review Your Site for HTTPS Problems

Once a certificate has been installed, it’s time to scrutinize the site to be sure it is totally valid using HTTPS. This is one of the most important, and potentially time-consuming, steps in switching a site to HTTPS.

To review your site for HTTPS validation, visit it by switching the HTTP in the address to HTTPS and scan the page source. Do this after a certificate has been installed, otherwise, the validation error from the lack of a certificate may prevent other validation errors from even appearing.

A common problem that prevents validation is the problem of mixed content, or content that mixes HTTP and HTTPS resources on the page. A valid HTTPS page should not include any HTTP resources. For instance, all JavaScript files and images should be pulled from HTTPS sources. Watch canonical URLs and link meta tags, as they should use the same HTTPS protocol. This is something that can be fixed even before switching the site to HTTPS, since HTTP pages can use HTTPS resources without any problem, just not the reverse.

There used to be a recommendation to use protocol-relative links, such as //example.com instead of http://example.com, but now the recommendation is to just always use HTTPS, if available since a HTTPS resource works fine under either protocol.

Absolute internal links should not conflate HTTP and HTTPS references. Ideally, all internal links should be relative links anyway, so they will work correctly under either HTTP or HTTPS. There are lots of other benefits of relative links, and few reasons not to use them.

For the most part, stock Drupal websites already use relative links wherever possible. In Drupal, some common sources of mixed content problems include:

  • Hard-coded HTTP links in custom block content.
  • Hard-coded HTTP links added by content authors in body, text, and link fields.
  • Hard-coded HTTP links in custom menu links.
  • Hard-coded HTTP links in templates and template functions.
  • Contributed modules that hard-code HTTP links in templates or theme functions.

Most browsers will display HTTPS errors in the JavaScript console. That’s the first place to look if the page isn’t validating as HTTPS. Google has an example page with mixed content errors where you can see how this looks.

undefined Redirect all Traffic to HTTPS

Once you’ve assured yourself that your website passes SSL validation, it’s time to be sure that all traffic goes over HTTPS instead of HTTP. You need 301 redirects from your HTTP pages to HTTPS, especially when switching from HTTP to HTTPS. If a website was already in production on HTTP, search engines have already indexed your pages. The 301 redirect ensures that search engines understand the new pages are a replacement for the old pages.

If you haven’t already, you need to determine whether you prefer the bare domain or the www version, example.com vs www.example.com. You should already be redirecting traffic away from one to the other for good SEO. When you include the HTTP and HTTPS protocols, at a minimum you will have four potential addresses to consider: http://example.com, https://example.com, https://example.com, and https://www.example.com. One of those should survive as your preferred address. You’ll need to set up redirects to reroute traffic away from all the others to that preferred location.

Specific details about how to handle redirects on the website server will vary depending on the operating system and configuration on the server. Shared hosts like Acquia Cloud and Pantheon provide detailed HTTPS redirection instructions that work on their specific configurations. Those instructions could provide useful clues to someone configuring a self-hosted website server as well.

HTTP Strict Transport Security (HSTS)

The final level of assurance that all traffic uses HTTPS is to implement the HTTP Strict Transport Security (HSTS) header on the secured site. The HSTS header creates a browser policy to always use HTTPS for the specified domain. Redirects are good, but there is still the potential for a Man-in-the-Middle to intercept the HTTP communication before it gets redirected to HTTPS. With HSTS, after the first communication with a domain, that browser will always initiate communication with HTTPS. The HSTS header contains a max-age when the policy expires, but the max-age is reset every time the user visits the domain. The policy will never expire if the user visits the site regularly, only if they fail to visit within the max-age period.

If you’re using Cloudflare’s SSL, as in my previous article, you can set the HSTS header in Cloudflare’s dashboard. It’s a configuration setting under the “Crypto” tab.

Local, Dev, and Stage Environments

A final consideration is whether or not to use HTTPS on all environments, including local, dev, and stage environments. That is truly HTTPS everywhere! If the live site uses HTTPS, it makes sense to use HTTPS in all environments for consistency.

HTTPS Is Important

Hopefully, this series of articles provides convincing evidence that it's important for sites of all sizes to start using the HTTPS protocol, and some ideas of how to make that happen. HTTPS Everywhere is a worthy initiative!

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DrupalCon News: Come Photograph DrupalCon Baltimore and Be a FamoUser

Planet Drupal - Mon, 2017/03/06 - 6:39pm

DrupalCon Asia started 2016 with a crushing abundance of selfies. There was no mercy for those on the sidelines; get involved or be ignored. However, there's a special few of us who are always there, yet never exactly engaged. We're a special breed of people, giving more of ourselves, to get more acclaim of those around us. We're open source photographers.

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Drupalize.Me: Drupal Dev Days Is in Spain

Planet Drupal - Mon, 2017/03/06 - 4:30pm

Drupal Dev Days has been a recurring event since 2010, when it got started in Munich. Since then it has changed location within Europe every year. This year it is being hosted in Seville, Spain from March 21-25. Dev Days is a special event, and I have my own very fond memories from previous years.

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Savas Labs: Five Drupal 8 Tips to Empower Content Authors

Planet Drupal - Mon, 2017/03/06 - 1:00am

Creating and publishing quality content within time constraints is a common challenge for many content authors. As web engineers, we are focused on helping our clients overcome this challenge by delivering systems that are intuitive, stable, and a pleasure to operate. Customizing the user experience for content authors is a critical component that site architects must implement in order to establish and maintain client satisfaction. Drupal 8 makes it easier for digital agencies to empower content creators and editors with the right tools to get the job done efficiently. Here are five tips in Drupal 8 that make the content authoring experience more enjoyable and productive. Continue reading…

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Paul Johnson: Working in Drupal is a real job, really?!

Planet Drupal - Sat, 2017/03/04 - 4:20pm

Take a moment to think back to the moment you first discovered it was possible to pursue a career in Drupal. Cast your mind even further back to how you actually heard about Drupal. For many of us, myself included, it was serendipity. A coincidence which changed the course of your life for the better. We read the right article, happened across a meetup, spoke to the right person. Sound familiar? More likely this than thinking at University or school that was the career path we were targeting.

Today Matt Glaman explained how he came to be stood in front of 500 people keynoting at DrupalCamp London. Working as a bar person, hobbyist Drupaler by night, back in 2013 he had no idea being a Drupal developer was a real job. Matt had the good fortune to meet Mike Anello, an inspirational member of the Drupal community. This triggered a chain of events which combined with self-motivation lead to Matt speaking to Ryan Szrama (another Drupalist with infectious enthusiasm) and ultimately working full time for Commerce Guys.

Open Source Software like Drupal (and the communities surrounding them) drives opportunity which can change people's lives. Matt's keynote left me wishing we could move to a situation where we as a project we are not so dependent upon coincidence. It's far from the first time I've felt this way. Vijayachandran Mani was living in rural India. He worked in Drupal for 4 years before really understanding open source or what the community and contribution was. Only when by chance Vijay stumbled across a blog by Dries Buytaert did he discover there were huge employment opportunities for him in India using Drupal. This ultimately resulted in Vijay moving to the UK and becoming a top 20 contributor to Drupal 8 core.

What about all those people we nearly hooked, the ones that weren't in that right place at the right time? The ones not quite brave enough to speak to us at a conference or meetup. How can we reach more of them?

Considering Drupal is celebrated far and wide for it's community, for me Drupal.org is a faceless place. It does not represent the warmth and diversity of our events. The welcoming nature of all we do. Wouldn't it be nice if we humanised this place. Create a special area where some of us could tell our personal story. Of how we came to do the jobs we do, the impact we generate in the real world through open source software. How we work often in modern and distributed ways, creating imaginative solutions for public services, charities, governments, non-profits and business. That being a Drupalist is a real and valuable career path. A place where those with potential to get involved could realise there are others just like them working in Drupal, role models if you will.

I see there being many parallels to this idea and the new industry landing pages the Drupal Association have realised. Not only should Drupal promote itself better to business but also future contributors and those embarking upon a career in digital. I'd welcome your thoughts on this idea.

File:  unnamed-2.jpg
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Wunderkraut Sweden Blog: Drupal Meetup 15/3 Stockholm

Planet Drupal - Sat, 2017/03/04 - 11:43am
It has been a while, but now it is time again for a Drupal Meetup in Stockholm, and it will be at the Wunderkraut office in Stockholm, signup for it here. There will be beer, mingle, talk about caching in Drupal 8, and more. Bring a friend or two!
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Hook 42: Hook 42 at Stanford Camp 2017

Planet Drupal - Sat, 2017/03/04 - 4:37am

It's that time of the year again! Time to connect in the South Bay! Stanford Camp is happening March 10th & 11th and will be here before we know it. 

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Drupal core announcements: Core will be updated to use short array syntax (many patches will need rerolls)

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2017/03/03 - 11:11pm

Drupal 8.3.x has entered its release candidate phase with the release of 8.3.0-rc1, which means we will now undertake disruptive cleanup tasks like adjusting coding standards. The main standards change during this release candidate phase will be the official adoption of short array syntax, e.g.:

<?php
  // Before:
  // $array = array('foo', 'bar');

  // After:
  $array = ['foo', 'bar'];
?>

Work is underway to patch core for this change, which will touch many files, so be aware that you will need to reroll patches for conflicts and adjust them to use the new standard.

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ThinkShout: See You at the NTC

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2017/03/03 - 3:00pm

The Nonprofit Technology Conference is just around the corner, and we’re hard at work making those final preparations for our trip to D.C. We have some exciting things in store for you this year, so mark your calendars!

Drupal Salon

This year, we’re honored to coordinate the first ever Drupal Salon at the NTC. In lieu of the traditional pre-conference days as we’ve done in previous years, NTEN set aside space and time for subject matter experts to present nine twenty-minute-long talks on all things Drupal on Thursday, March 23rd. These talks will take place as part of the formal NTC schedule, and sessions can be viewed in the Wordpress & Drupal Salon tracks on the NTC site.

We’re excited to have experts from the Southern Poverty Law Center, Shatterproof, and the Center for Strategic and International Studies share their Drupal insight and experiences. ThinkShout will also be providing one-on-one consulting at our Drupal Salon table, so bring us all of your Drupal questions! Drupal hosting providers Pantheon and Acquia will also be on hand to tackle whatever Drupal hosting questions you may have.

We hope you’ll be able to join us! Here’s what we’ll be talking about:

We’re confident that the Drupal Salon sessions will have a little something for everyone, and we look forward to connecting with the nonprofit community with this new format.

Meet the ThinkShout Team

Be sure to catch our team session on March 23rd, as well!

The ThinkShout team will have a presence in the Exhibit Hall this year, of course. Stop by our booth (#501) and chat; we’ll be debuting brand new t-shirts and we’re excited to share them with you all (for free)! This is a great opportunity to learn more about our work and the organizations we partner with. We’re also available to talk about anything B Corp related, so send those questions our way!

If you’d like to schedule a time to meet with our staff at the NTC in advance, drop us a line through our contact form. See you in the capitol!

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