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Code Karate: Creating a hierarchy of users with the Drupal Subuser module

vr, 2015/03/20 - 12:57am
Episode Number: 198

In this episode we cover the Drupal Subuser module. This module makes it easy to allow your users to manage other users on your site. This works great if you want to allow a site manager to be able to add in users of a specific role, but not have access to the full Drupal User Administration pages.

Tags: DrupalDrupal 7Site BuildingDrupal Planet
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Drupal core announcements: Propsed policy: Re-activate the head2head project and use it for D8 beta-to-beta upgrades in the short-term

do, 2015/03/19 - 10:37pm

In order to support a beta-to-beta upgrade path for Drupal 8 users sooner, the core committers have posted a proposal that recommends re-activating the http://drupal.org/project/head2head project in contrib and building the beta-to-beta upgrade path there in the short-term. This allows early adopters to have access to an upgrade path much earlier than core would be able to provide, and also gives us a "safe space" to test beta-to-beta upgrades prior to supporting them formally in core, without slowing down our current velocity on critical issue fixing.

Please share your thoughts, especially if you're one of the adventurous early adopters who are actively building on Drupal 8 already!

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Shomeya: All about that trace, 'bout that trace

do, 2015/03/19 - 5:25pm

No one likes debugging code when it breaks and you can't figure out why it's broken. That piece of code might have been hard enough to write in the first place, or maybe it's a snippet that "should work" from a coworker, or maybe the documentation is missing, or maybe.... But what if you've checked, double and triple checked, and it's still not your code, it's something else in the system – code you're calling out to, or something that is calling your code – what do you do then?

Enter the backtrace, (also known as stack trace, or just trace). A powerful weapon in any software developers toolkit, it is more and more useful as the software you develop grows in complexity (Drupal 8 anyone?)

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Drupal Easy: Book Review: Programming Guide to Drupal

do, 2015/03/19 - 4:20pm

O'Reilly's Programmer's Guide to Drupal, written by Jennifer Hodgdon is a solid book for Drupal developers of all skill levels. I'd argue that it is one of the better books for PHP developers wanting to learn more about Drupal. It provides a wealth of solid information on a nice array of topics that professional Drupal developers should know. It's not a long read (less than 100 pages of actual content), but the structure and variety of topics covered makes it a great reference for best practices and intermediate to advanced "what's the best way to do this?" topics in Drupal development.

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read more

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Drupal Watchdog: Painless User Docs

do, 2015/03/19 - 3:21pm
Article

User documentation is a tricky thing to manage. On the one hand, docs are invaluable to your clients. But on the other, keeping “Write User Manual” at the top of your priority list is next to impossible, especially as you approach your go-live date.

The secret to squeezing good user docs into your schedule is to approach them the same way you would any other deliverable: create as little as possible from scratch by building on work you’ve already done, keep your users in mind at all times, and work efficiently.

That all sounds pretty familiar, right? Let’s talk about how to adapt these practices to user documentation.

Build a Template

Every site you build is different and requires a tailored set of docs. But that doesn’t mean you should be writing documentation from scratch each time. Instead, take a few hours to pull together a docs template. Working from a template can take the documentation process from a long, painful slog at deadline-time to a set of manageable little writing sprints, spread out over the entire development process.

Where to start?

First, pull together the elements that will appear in every user manual, for example, a general introduction to Drupal. Include chapters that cover the steps in content creation, an overview of the administrative menus, and a layman’s definition of things like nodes, blocks, and views. All these chapters will remain virtually untouched, from one site to the next, saving countless hours of writing.

As you build out the framework for your docs, keep your content as modular as possible. Creating self-contained chunks does two things for you: it makes it easy to rearrange sections from one manual to the next – without extensive rewrites – plus, it helps you keep track of what content needs updating and what doesn’t.

Once you’ve got the basics covered and the overall structure of your template worked out, writing your docs will be a simple matter of filling in details. If you write up features and functionality as they are being built, by the time you’re in the deadline crunch, your docs will be 90 percent complete.

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Cheppers blog: Rebuilding the Cheppers website with Drupal 8: On The Road

do, 2015/03/19 - 11:59am

The Cheppers team has decided to make our new website with Drupal 8. You can read about how and why we made this decision here. The following series of posts will document our progress, share the important lessons we learn, and highlight any mistakes we make in order to help others as they set out to use Drupal 8. This post will focus on exporting and importing site configuration.

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KnackForge: Programmatically create a node in drupal 7

do, 2015/03/19 - 10:17am

Steps for programmatically creating node in drupal7,
1. Create a new node object.
2. Save the object using the node_save() function.

Basic Node Creation :

$complaint_body = 'Your node complaint body text'; $node = new stdClass();  // Create a new node object $node->type = 'company';  // Content type $node->language = LANGUAGE_NONE;  // Or e.g. 'en' if locale is enabled node_object_prepare($node);  //Set some default values $node->title = 'Your node title'; $node->body[$node->language][0]['value'] = $complaint_body; $node->body[$node->language][0]['summary'] = text_summary($complaint_body); $node->body[$node->language][0]['format'] = 'full_html'; $node->status = 1;   // (1 or 0): published or unpublished $node->promote = 0;  // (1 or 0): promoted to front page or not $node->sticky = 0;  // (1 or 0): sticky at top of lists or not $node->comment = 1;  // 2 = comments open, 1 = comments closed, 0 = comments hidden // Add author of the node $node->uid = 1; // Set created date $node->date = 'complaint_post_date'; $node->created = strtotime('complaint_post_date'); $path = 'content/mytest-' . date('YmdHis'); $node->path = array('alias' => $path); // Save the node node_save($node);

Add custom fields

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KnackForge: Hide and override drupal status messages

do, 2015/03/19 - 10:17am

      This blog describes how to hide and override drupal status messages while creating and editing nodes.

      When you create or edit the nodes, drupal displays status messages like 'node has been created' and 'node has been updated'. Some may not be interested to view these messages. You can hide these messages using drupal_get_messages(). It returns all messages that have been set using drupal_set_message(). You need to add it to a custom submit handler for the corresponding form. You can add custom submit handler using either hook_form_alter() or hook_form_form_id_alter() in drupal. 

       To hide drupal status messages, use the code below. For example, i have hidden the status messages only for article node form.

<?php /** * Implement hook_form_alter() */ function kf_form_alter(&$form, &$form_state, $form_id) { if ($form_id == 'article_node_form') { // to add custom submit handler $form['actions']['submit']['#submit'][] = 'kf_article_form_submit'; } } /** * Implement kf_article_form_submit */ function kf_article_form_submit($form, &$form_state) { // to hide drupal status messages drupal_get_messages('status'); } ?>

       Similarly you can override these status messages. For that, you need to add messages after drupal_get_messages() in the custom submit handler.

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Bryan Braun: An Opinionated Guide to Getting Help with Drupal

do, 2015/03/19 - 4:12am

You are facing a Drupal problem and you need help. We've all been there.

Drupal is a mature open source project with a vast community, so there are a lot places you can look for help*, and they all have their pros and cons. I’ve spent nearly 4 years trying them all and I found that some options work better for me than others. If you want to save yourself the experimenting and just use the opinionated approach I use today, then stick around; this is the guide to getting help with Drupal that I wish I had several years ago.

Without further ado, here is the list of support channels I currently use, prioritized in the order that I use them:

1. Google It

Many things can be solved quickly through an online search. Drupal.org has a search bar, and I tried to use it a lot when I was getting started, but I’ve since learned that you just can’t compete with Google when it comes to search. Pro-tip: you can search Drupal.org exclusively from Google by using the “site” keyword: “site:drupal.org."

Strength: Access to a ton of content. Exact searching of error messages.
Weakness: You often have to know the right vocabulary

2. Ask People you Work With

Online searches can fall short when your problem is fairly specific, or you don’t know the right vocabulary to use to describe your problem. Sometimes you just need to point at a screen and say “have you ever seen this before?” Face to face communication is fast, and effective (as long as you’ve got somebody experienced around you can talk to).

Strength: Face to face communication is often faster and easier
Weakness: Success will depend entirely on who you work with

3. Ask On Stack Exchange

Stack Exchange is a well-designed Q&A site that provides community-curated answers to programming questions. You’ll find that there are Drupal questions on both the main site (stack overflow.com) as well as the Drupal-specific site (drupal.stackexchange.com), but you’ll want to ask Drupal questions on the Drupal site. I have found the community there to be very active with most of my questions receiving responses in a matter of hours.

Strength: It’s a forum highly optimized for a good Q&A experience.
Weakness: The wrong kind of questions won’t survive here (like subjective questions or site-specific issues)
Link: http://drupal.stackexchange.com

4. Drupal.org Issue Queues

If you can isolate your issue down to a specific project (like a module, theme, or Drupal core) then you can go to the Drupal.org issue queue for help. If your issue has already been reported in the queue, you may find recommendations from the maintainer or even patches that fix the problem. Otherwise you can report the issue yourself. On one occasion I needed to fix an unfamiliar search-related issue that was outside my skill set, and I reported it in the issue queue of a contrib project. The maintainer got back to me in 2-3 days and posted a patch that fixed it. I benefited by getting a fix from an expert (which could have taken me days/weeks to figure out myself), and the project benefited from my QA work (the fix was included in the next module release). That’s the power of open source.

Strength: Can get expert feedback (and maybe even fixes) from module maintainers.
Weakness: Not useful unless you have isolated the issue.
Link: http://www.drupal.org/project/<project-name>/issues

5. Official Documentation

By official documentation, I’m talking about the Docs on Drupal.org, explanations on Module pages, or information found in README.txt files. These docs are often a great place to look if you are looking for help getting a module or theme installed and set up for the first time. Other than that, I haven’t had much luck browsing through them for my specific issues. The way I see it, if something in the official docs addresses your problem, you’ll come across it when googling your issue.

Strength: Entry-level instructions and set-up steps.
Weakness: Contains a lot of old information. Difficult to browse.
Link: http://drupal.org/documentation

6. Twitter

It’s hard to have a good conversation in 140 characters, but if you have enough followers who know Drupal (or you can get a retweet from somebody who does) then it can still be valuable. One way I’ve used it effectively is to ask my question on StackOverflow and then send the link out to Twitter to give it some attention if I’m not getting answers.

Strength: You may have more success asking your personal connections.
Weakness: 140 character limitation. Question can get lost in the mix.
Link: https://twitter.com

7. IRC

The Drupal community has IRC chatrooms on freenode at #drupal and #drupal-support designed for support. Some people really like using IRC for support; In some ways it’s like the “asking people you work with" suggestion above. That being said, I’ve always struggled to get answers via IRC. I feel awkward jumping in when there are already conversations in the channel, and several times I’ll ask a question but it promptly gets lost in the back scroll with no response. Plus, questions asked in IRC are usually not archived or searchable so the conversation you have won't benefit future people with your problem. So your mileage may vary, but I’ve yet to have a successful support experience on IRC.

Strength: Community of experts
Weakness: Chatrooms are not designed for Q&A.
Link: http://drupal.org/irc

Other Options

There are other options that I won’t discuss in detail. They all have strengths and weaknesses (which I’ll list below), but they aren’t really part of my main help workflow for one reason or another.

  • Drupal.org Forums - My questions have gone unanswered here. I’ve seen successful threads, but they seem pretty rare to me.
  • Groups.Drupal.org - Quality varies widely from group to group. I’ve seen groups with good discussion and others with lots of spam.
  • Local User groups - Good for subjective questions but not deep troubleshooting.
  • Books - Good for generic instruction, site building, and walkthroughs but not for heavy custom development.
  • Training - Can be online, on-site, or workshops. Good for generic instruction, site building, and walkthroughs but not for heavy custom development.
  • Conferences - Good for generic instruction and subjective questions. Not great for deep troubleshooting.
  • Example modules - Good for learning Drupal coding patterns but not for troubleshooting
  • Professional Services - Good for getting high-level architecture and security recommendations. Offering varies depending on the provider.
  • Api docs - Good for looking up specific Drupal  API functions.
  • [Insert your social network here]

Finally, whatever you ask, and whoever you ask it to, remember that you have a responsibility to ask good questions.

* Here’s the official drupal.org page on getting help (we covered all the options here and more).

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Open Source Training: Views Calc - Calculations for Your Fields in Views

do, 2015/03/19 - 12:09am

Views Calc is useful little Drupal module that allows you to perform calculations inside Views.

Views Calc allows you to perform Count, Sum, Average or Minimum calculations on a single field.

Let's see an example of how Views Calc works. To follow the example, you need both the Views and Views Calc modules to be enabled.

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Acquia: Behat & BDD: "Deploying better software with confidence" - meet John Bickar

wo, 2015/03/18 - 11:21pm
Language Undefined

While speaking with Melissa Anderson about behavior driven development (BDD) at BADCamp 2014, she suggested I get John Bickar from Stanford Web Services in front of my cameras to talk about his experience during last year's "Drupalgeddon" security vulnerability. The result is this podcast and some great insight into how this kind of testing can significantly improve initial, ongoing, and emergency delivery of software. As John puts it, using BDD means: "delivering better software, delivering it faster, and knowing that it is delivering the value that we have promised to our partners." I would have named this episode of the Acquia Podcast more in the spirit of Dr. Strangelove: "Behat tests mean death to Linky-Clicky or how BDD helped Stanford Web Services recover fast during Drupalgeddon," but reason won out.

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Shomeya: Bootstrap Theme vs. Barebones/Roll your own?

wo, 2015/03/18 - 9:15pm

Some of the biggest arguments against using a framework like Bootstrap or Foundation, is that they are heavy, have inherited bad design choices, and overcomplicate things. Some people even go so far as to say to never use them. And these arguments are, at least semantically, right.

But the reality is this. You could have a totally lightweight, custom self-built car too.

Read more
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Lullabot: Wrapping AngularJS modules in Drupal CTools plugins

wo, 2015/03/18 - 8:00pm

A crucial requirement for the MSNBC's recent online TV revamp was a highly interactive user interface that didn't interfere with the site's all-important video player. In our previous work on the main MSNBC site, we had used AngularJS to decouple complex front-end UI behaviors from the Drupal-powered backend. With that experience, using AngularJS for the new requirements was a no-brainer.

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Drupal Association News: Meet the DrupalCon Team

wo, 2015/03/18 - 7:41pm

Putting on three DrupalCons each year requires a huge amount of manpower and dedication. It’s a labor of love, and wouldn’t be possible without teams of passionate volunteers, working with a dedicated staff at the Drupal Association.

Who is the Drupal Association’s DrupalCon team? For those who wonder about the people behind the magical events, we’ve put together this guide to the folks who make DrupalCon happen.

Rachel Friesen, Events Manager

Rachel (racheldrupal) has been with the Drupal Association for a year, and works as an events manager to guide the DrupalCon team through the entire process of planning and executing a DrupalCon. One of Rachel’s primary functions is to set strategy for each DrupalCon, including objectives for individual conventions and how to move towards future goals. Rachel is responsible for budgeting, working with contracts, and keeping the project moving.

When not making recommendations to the board about the location of the next DrupalCon or acting as the big cheese on site for events, Rachel enjoys curling, and grew up wanting to be a marine biologist. Her favorite part of each DrupalCon event is watching the reveal for the location of the next DrupalCon during the closing session.

Amanda Gonser, Lead DrupalCon Coordinator

Amanda (amanda.drupal) joined the Drupal Association in October, and came to the Association with experience planning events around the world. As the Lead DrupalCon Coordinator, Amanda works with the community volunteers, manages the programming of each DrupalCon, and handles the website content. Amanda is working hard on DrupalCon Los Angeles and can’t wait to see it all come together this May.

Amanda spent nearly five years living in the Basque Country of Spain, and when not working, she devours books like some people eat chocolate. Amanda has two kitties who rule her life, and this year, she’s trying out her green thumb with her first flower garden.

Tina Krauss, DrupalCon Coordinator

Tina (tinakrauss) is the newest member of the DrupalCon team, and came on board in mid March. As a DrupalCon Coordinator, Tina will work with each con’s volunteers, assist in con programming and logistics, and work with website content. Tina is also focused on customer support and responds to tickets submitted to our Contact Us form related to the Cons.

A native of Germany, Tina moved to Portland, Oregon several years ago, where she currently resides. In her free time, Tina is an adventurer. She loves to travel around the world -- the farther, the better! She also enjoys outdoor activities like hiking, biking, backpacking, skiing, and more.

Timothy Constien, Sponsorship Fulfillment Coordinator

As Sponsorship Fulfillment Coordinator, Tim (timconstien) acts as a liaison between the Drupal Association’s revenue team and the DrupalCon team. His focus is on maintaining and building strong relationships with our sponsors, ensuring that sponsors’ DrupalCon experiences go above and beyond, and that each sponsor’s investment is maximized across every possible marketing platform, including social media, the DrupalCon website, at the DrupalCon event, and more.

Tim is an extreme sports enthusiast, and loves snowboarding and skateboarding. He also likes skiing and surfing, and the lifestyle around those sports. Tim enjoys spending his free time in Portland seeking out the city’s best cheap food and craft beers.

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Drupal Association News: A look back at Membership and changes for 2015

wo, 2015/03/18 - 7:36pm

Are you interested in what is happening with Drupal Association membership? This is the first of two posts about our membership program. We've made some changes, but much remains the same. You may notice that the price slider has been removed from the contribution pages and it is replaced with price points that provide clearer options for paying. The new price points were selected after looking at the most frequent gift amounts from the slider. Don't worry, though: the minimum fee for membership will remain at the same levels as last year. We are also experimenting by testing graphics and placement of items on the pages and will let you know the results as you may find them useful for your own projects.

This slider on our contribution pages allowed members to choose a price to pay but it lacked information to guide members in selecting a price.

I want to explain why we moved away from the slider, but first, let's go over some history. The Drupal Association membership program began in 2007. For six years we kept membership dues at the same amounts. In 2013, we decided to make some changes after hearing from the community that there was a need for more price options. The idea was that, with flexible prices, more of the worldwide Drupal community could give back and become members while paying what they could afford.

To give donors more incentive to choose membership, we also decreased the minimum donation amount for individuals by 32%. Conversely, we raised the minimum amount for organizations-- Drupal itself has grown and matured, and we knew that Drupal businesses have as well. We figured, if this new structure did not work for an organization, the option for Individual membership would still be a good one.

So in mid-2013, we launched the slider pages into the universe. We learned that the slider did not provide users with enough guidance on how much to give. There was not enough information to suggest appropriate gift amounts, and members gave at many price points. So we have said farewell to the slider and will assess the price point performance in the months to come.

In the next post, we give a recap of 2014. If you have any thoughts or suggestions to share on the change or membership in general, your feedback is always welcome. Find me via contact form and reach out anytime.

Personal blog tags: Membership
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Drupal.org frontpage posts for the Drupal planet: Drupal 7.35 and 6.35 released

wo, 2015/03/18 - 7:10pm

Drupal 7.35 and Drupal 6.35, maintenance releases which contain fixes for security vulnerabilities, are now available for download. See the Drupal 7.35 and Drupal 6.35 release notes for further information.

Download Drupal 7.35
Download Drupal 6.35

Upgrading your existing Drupal 7 and 6 sites is strongly recommended. There are no new features or non-security-related bug fixes in these releases. For more information about the Drupal 7.x release series, consult the Drupal 7.0 release announcement. More information on the Drupal 6.x release series can be found in the Drupal 6.0 release announcement.

Security information

We have a security announcement mailing list and a history of all security advisories, as well as an RSS feed with the most recent security advisories. We strongly advise Drupal administrators to sign up for the list.

Drupal 7 and 6 include the built-in Update Status module (renamed to Update Manager in Drupal 7), which informs you about important updates to your modules and themes.

Bug reports

Both Drupal 7.x and 6.x are being maintained, so given enough bug fixes (not just bug reports) more maintenance releases will be made available, according to our monthly release cycle.

Changelog

Drupal 7.35 is a security release only. For more details, see the 7.35 release notes. A complete list of all bug fixes in the stable 7.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Drupal 6.35 is a security release only. For more details, see the 6.35 release notes. A complete list of all bug fixes in the stable 6.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Security vulnerabilities

Drupal 7.35 and 6.35 were released in response to the discovery of security vulnerabilities. Details can be found in the official security advisory:

To fix the security problem, please upgrade to either Drupal 7.35 or Drupal 6.35.

Update notes

See the 7.35 and 6.35 release notes for details on important changes in this release.

Known issues

See the 7.35 and 6.35 release notes for known issues with this release.

Front page news: Planet DrupalDrupal version: Drupal 6.xDrupal 7.x
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Drupal Association News: A Recap of Drupal Association Membership in 2014

wo, 2015/03/18 - 6:42pm
AttachmentSize Drupal_Assoc_Membership_2014.png351.91 KB

Interested in what is happening with Drupal Association membership? Here's a recap of 2014.

Last year, the Drupal Association membership program had a solid renewal rate, slight overall growth, and we surpassed revenue goals. We're happy to point out that even though the overall number of Organization Members has declined (our peak was 619 active organization members in 2013), it's because 82 of those companies have become our Supporters. This means they give at even greater levels than members. To all of our supporters, cheers and thank you for giving back to Drupal!

(For the general public: if you see a profile or company page on Drupal.org with a badge on it, you can thank the individual or organization for all that they do for Drupal!)

Do you have more thoughts or questions about membership? Find me via contact form anytime with your feedback.

Personal blog tags: Membership
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LevelTen Interactive: New To Drupal? These Videos Will Help You Get Started

wo, 2015/03/18 - 6:20pm

These videos are part of our tutorial series which can be found here: Getting Started with Drupal 7... Read more

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Chromatic: CHROMATIC at MidCamp and DrupalCamp NOLA

wo, 2015/03/18 - 5:38pm

We have two team members slated to speak at two different Drupal Camps in March!

Gus Childs will be delivering a talk at MidCamp in Chicago titled, "Need a Better Way to Organize Your Features? Go Ask Alice." It’s based on a blog post of ours and he’ll cover Features best practices and how to stay sane while using them on your bigger projects.

Mark Dorison will be speaking at DrupalCamp NOLA on 3/28. His talk, "Spend More Time Surfing: Simplifying Your Code (and Life) With Entityfieldquery & EntityMetadataWrapper" will cover methods you can use right now to work with entities in Drupal 7.

If you’re attending either of these camps, be sure to say “hello” to Gus, Mark, or any other CHROMATIC team member that might be floating around. You just might land yourself a CHROMATIC t-shirt!

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Wellnet Blog: Weekly Module Review - #4 MEFIBS – More Exposed Forms In Blocks!

wo, 2015/03/18 - 5:10pm

Today we’ll analyze the module MEFIBS (More Exposed Forms In Blocks).
Lately I often lighted on having the need to insert some exposed filters in more blocks, staying on the same view!

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