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Amazee Labs: We’re Going to DrupalCon Seattle!

Wed, 2019/03/27 - 8:12pm
We’re Going to DrupalCon Seattle!

We’re excited to attend and present at DrupalCon Seattle this year. Here’s a breakdown of what we’re looking forward to day by day, and information about where you can see Amazee sessions throughout the week.

Felix Morgan Wed, 03/27/2019 - 20:12

Monday, 8 April

Monday and Tuesday will be a time for summits, sprints, and BoFs. Be sure to check out Michael Schmid as part of the Performance and Scaling Summit. In the evening you can join the DrupalCon Monday Night Pub-Crawl for community and drinks.

Tuesday, 9 April

In addition to the many summits and sprints be sure to check out the First-time Attendee Networking Breakfast if you're new to DrupalCon. After hours you can join a group run or one of several parties.

Wednesday, 10 April

In the morning, don’t miss the annual DriesNote where you can hear about the current state of Drupal as well as what the future holds. In the evening, the prestigious Splash Awards will showcase the best of Drupal from 2018 in the inaugural global international edition of these awards.

Thursday, 11 April

Thursday will be a day full of Amazee sessions. First up, Maria Comas will host her session GraphQL 101: What, Why, How from 09:45 - 10:15 in Room: 606. Be sure to check it out to get a basic overview of GraphQL and how to get started using it.

Catch John Albin Wilkins and his session CSS-in-JS and Drupal sitting in a tree… from 10:45 - 11:15 in Room: 6B. John will discuss the learnings from Amazee Labs trying several different CSS-in-JS solutions and why we finally decided on using CSS Modules.

In the afternoon, Michael Schmid will present Best Practices: How We Run Decoupled Websites with 110 Million Hits per Month at 13:00 in Room: 6C.

Finally, you can finish out Thursday with the popular social event Trivia Night where you can test out your Drupal knowledge with a chance to win prizes or earn the title of Drupal trivia champions, and win small prizes to boot!

Friday, 12 April

On the final day of DrupalCon, the community comes together to make contributions before saying goodbye until next year. We can’t wait to see all of you at DrupalCon 2019!

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OPTASY: OPTASY Team Favorite Drupal Blog Posts from March: Top 5

Wed, 2019/03/27 - 6:14pm
OPTASY Team Favorite Drupal Blog Posts from March: Top 5 adriana.cacoveanu Wed, 03/27/2019 - 17:14

A handful of “life-saving” module releases, enlightening tutorials, well-curated  Drupal theme selections... This month has “spoiled” us with lots of valuable Drupal blog posts. Therefore, coming up with a shortlist of 5 Drupal blog posts has been quite a challenge for us here, at OPTASY.

But, in the end, we did manage to trim our bulky lists of favorites. To focus on our common preferences and keep only the following truly valuable pieces of content on Drupal in our final selection:
 

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Sooper Drupal Themes: Customer Experience: 6 key insights to prevent your customers from leaving you

Wed, 2019/03/27 - 5:52pm
How do customers choose a brand or company?

When we think of what influences a consumer on which brand to pick we usually think of advertising, right? Well, while advertising does have some impact in the customer decision making process, what matters more is the customer experience provided. Nowadays, in order for a company to be able to stay relevant in the field that it is activating, it has to be able to provide a seamless customer experience.

Customer experience makes or breaks a business

At this moment, the customers have the power to really punish a company for not providing the products or services on par with the competition. Given the fierce rivarly between businesses and the wide range of competitors, a customer has the power to change companies at will, without any consequences. What this means is that, companies have to increasingly keep up with the rising expectations of the consumer. According to the studies, half of the customers are prone to leave a good or bad review regarding the satisfaction of the services or products provided by a company. This trend applies especially to the younger generations.

The importance of customer retention

So, why is it important to keep a customer? According to studies, it is five times more expensive to acquire a new client rather than to keep investing in an already existing customer. On top of that, the probability of selling to an already existing customer is significantly higher than to sell to a newly attracted lead. Also, already existing clients are more likely to try new products while also spending in general more than a new one.

What makes a customer leave?

The biggest reason why customers are leaving is usually the fact that they have received an unsatisfactory service or product from the company. Nowadays, consumers are quick to penalize a company for an unsatisfactory experience. On top of that they are well aware that their influence in the marketplace is stronger than ever, are willing to use that power to influence your companies reputation for both good or ill. The leading causes for customers leaving is that the company or brand is not taking into consideration the customer needs. On top of that, providing a poor customer support and not learning from the feedback also adds up to the customers leaving. Naturally, not every customer experience can be a positive one, at some point there are bound to be some mistakes, maybe a parcel is delivered on the wrong address or the product delivered is in poor condition. Now, when those situations arise, the customer is taking into account how the company is responding to those situations. If the client has the feeling that he is putting more effort in fixing the problem than the company, then he is way more inclined to spread the word about his bad experience to others, while also being more prone towards switching brands altogether.

What should you do to prevent customers from leaving?

The best way to prevent a customer from leaving is to provide a really good customer experience. To do that, it is good to take into consideration that companies have to provide a good customer experience across every step and stage of the customer life cycle. Moreover, customers expect ease and convenience every step on the way regardless of how, when or why they are in contact with your company. Also, customers consider that speed is paramount. Basically, they expect to get what they need without delay. When filing a complaint, the consumers also want for it to be immediately addressed, same goes for when they post a review. One way of keeping customers is to make a loyalty program rewarding them with something of value for their loyalty. This way, the customer is going to feel that he is appreciated and he is going to be more likely to stick around and be a good consumer to you.

Why is this important for your Drupal business? Basically, you can apply this information to your Drupal business in a couple of ways. You can take into consideration the needs of your customer by researching and asking him about the kind of website he wants to have build for him. You should provide your customer with features that make their website more easy-to-use, for example by installing our Glazed Builder visual page builder. Next, you can take into account the feedback provided by your client, regarding the website you are building for him. After the project is done, you can provide fast customer service and support. It is important your support is available through your customer's preferred channel, whether that be email, phone, or  making all these elements add up to a seamless customer experience, which your client will be more than thrilled to be a part of. Conclusion

Key insights to keep in mind: 

  • Provide a seamless customer experience
  • Take into consideration the customer needs
  • Personalize the experience based on every consumer
  • Take negative feedback into consideration
  • Provide fast service and customer support
  • Reward loyalty 

If you want to be competitive on the market, then be sure to deliver an unforgettable customer experience to your consumer. Nowadays, customers are sure to punish or reward a company or brand according to the experience that was provided, so, be sure to be on the good side of the consumer to be able to reap most of the benefits.

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Axelerant Blog: DrupalCamp London 2019: Agency Leaders Dinner Recap

Wed, 2019/03/27 - 5:14pm


DrupalCamp London brought together hundreds of Drupalers of all stripes and sorts.This includes of course the C-suite: big movers, entrepreneurial founders, diverse CXOs—those leaders tasked with driving both consistency and change at their agency.

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InternetDevels: Useful Drupal 8 modules for Drupal Commerce shopping cart

Wed, 2019/03/27 - 4:13pm

Every store owner dreams that their shopping cart is full of goods and successfully proceeds to checkout. There are general shopping cart tips to achieve this. Today, we will focus on Drupal Commerce stores that have many ways to make your cart convenient and attractive. To implement them, there are useful Drupal 8 modules for Drupal Commerce shopping cart, which we will review right now.

Read more
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AddWeb Solution: What is govCMS?

Wed, 2019/03/27 - 6:54am

What is govCMS?

The govCMS distribution is supported in Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 version, which has installation profiles for Australian government websites and it is being actively managed on Github (https://github.com/govCMS/govCMS8) and features are maintained from https://www.govcms.gov.au/.
 

To work with govCMS, we have to take care of some factors in order to create a site with the govCMS platform.
 

They have limited number of the module they support and we have to stick to that only and need to find alternate options with the twig and preprocess functions only and they do not allow us to create custom modules as well.
 

Here is the list of modules that they support: https://www.govcms.gov.au/govCMS-d7-modules
 

Unfortunately supported modules for Drupal 8 are less compare to Drupal 7, but we can create support request of community and if it's valid then they can include a module on SaaS platform.
 

Our Experience about working with govCMS

We have worked with govCMS for one of our clients from Australia, who is working with another agency before we met, and already he had started site development with them, and fortunately, he gets to know about the quality of work done so far from the previous agency.

 

They have added lots of contrib modules and to achieve some functionality they have created custom modules as well, but as the govCMS platform doesn't support such modules we have to flush out all existing implementation and started from the beginning.

 

All features which are build using custom/contrib modules, we had to find alternatives and get things done only with supported modules and using preprocess functions and twig alters. and along with that, we have to make sure that site is WCAG compliance as it is a government website they must be. So all things we delivered to the client successfully as per the client's expectation with the boundary of govCMS restriction.


 

More details about what is govCMS

Drupal gets big in the Australian Government
 

With almost half of Australian Government departments now running Drupal, and hundreds of more sites now live within various agencies, Drupal has transformed the way government websites are built and managed.
 

Drupal 7 : https://www.drupal.org/project/govcms

Drupal 8 : https://www.drupal.org/project/govcms8
 

The aim is to provide a single solution for unclassified websites using a common codebase and a shared feature set on a scalable and secure list infrastructure.

govCMS distribution is supported as SaaS by amazeelabs in collaboration with govCMS community and it supports several contributed modules which are available, here is a list of modules which can be used with SaaS https://www.govcms.gov.au/govCMS-d7-modules.
 

Workflows and Ahoy

It is interesting to see that the .ahoy.yml is just a set of command shortcuts, which is similar to the scripts section of a composer.json. Every implementation can be smoothed over by a single Ahoy command, and the underlying implementation can evolve without the developer even noticing.

Speculating, I think the hardest part about adding Ahoy commands will be naming them. Even then, the GovCMS team will have the luxury of focussing on the "SaaS govcms 8 on Lagoon" use case, rather than something like BLT which attempts to have commands for "any Drupal anywhere".

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Flocon de toile | Freelance Drupal: Automatically provide options to a list field type with Drupal 8

Wed, 2019/03/27 - 1:54am
Drupal 8 has a multitude of field types to cover a large number of use cases and situations when it comes to structuring and modeling content. Among these, we have a List field type which, as its name suggests, allows us to configure an input field based on a list of predefined options. This list of options must be set manually in the field's storage options at the time of creation. But we can also use this field based on a list of options that can be provided dynamically. Let's look at how we need to proceed to have a field that allows us to choose from a list of dynamic options.
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Lullabot: UX For Kids: A Personal Journey

Tue, 2019/03/26 - 10:12pm

As a user experience designer, most of my career has been focused on designing for adults. When the opportunity arose to help redesign a product for kids, I jumped at the chance to learn something new. Though, switching focuses from serving adult audiences to children proved to be a challenge. I'm not a parent and also usually do not interact with kids on a daily basis.

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Aten Design Group: Functional Testing with Katalon Recorder

Tue, 2019/03/26 - 5:39pm

When it comes to testing in software development, the range of options is huge. From unit testing on the backend through browser compatibility testing on the front end, there are a variety of testing approaches that will save you, your clients, and their audiences, time and headache. Katalon Recorder is a quick, simple way to get started with testing and to see the value that automated tests provide within a matter of minutes.

What is Katalon Recorder?

Katalon Recorder (KR) is a Selenium-driven browser plugin for Chrome and FireFox that lets you control your browser with simple commands instead of actual clicking, typing, tabbing, and scrolling. Put simply, KR can interact with your web application and report back when things don’t go as planned. Katalon Recorder aims to emulate human actions such as clicking, typing, and verifying the status of onscreen content - and as such works very well as an automated replacement for human testing.

How does it work?

With Katalon Recorder, you can record your browser actions - such as clicking through your menu items - and then play those actions back as automated commands. You can also handcraft a wide variety of commands that assert the existence of HTML elements or copy, among a host of other things. The successful playback of well crafted tests indicates that your menus, content, and HTML structure haven't changed — in other words your application is behaving as expected.

The Basics: Record and Playback

After clicking Record KR will bring your browser into focus, then log all of your interactions as individual commands. Once Stop is clicked, those commands can be played back, saved to a file, shared with others to play in their browsers, or modified to fine-tune functionality. With Katalon Recoder’s Record feature setting up initial tests that mirror human-driven clickthroughs takes moments of your time and can then be played back by anyone anywhere — including non-technical staff or even client teams.

Creating Complex, Rigorous Tests

Katalon Recorder allows you to organize one or more individual commands as Test Cases, and one or more Test Cases as Test Suites. Complicated tests can be created by chaining together several Test Suites. You could, for example, write tests that log a test user in, search for a product by SKU, click into the results, add the product to their cart, navigate to the cart and assert the product is there, then complete the purchase using test financial data. All of those actions except assert the product is in the cart can be recorded from your interactions. That means that in many cases, the amount of time that it takes for you to perform an action on your website is, using the recorder feature, the amount of time it takes you to write the automated test.

Flexibility Via Hand-Crafted Commands

In some cases the rigidity of recorded actions is a drawback. If, for example, you want to search for the tag Home Appliances and then click into the product Test Toaster, but you aren’t sure where in the search results that item will be, a recorded action informed by precise HTML structure might fall short. In those cases, you can use a combination of CSS and XPATH selectors to find and interact with your elements regardless of where exactly in the DOM they exist.

Storing Variables with Javascript

Sometimes a human tester needs to remember something, like the name or unique ID of a piece of content, in order to proceed with their test. Let’s say, for example, you’re testing a Drupal site wherein you first want to create a new Person node, then associate it via an entity reference field with a Group node on that node’s creation form. Using Katalon Recorder’s storeEval command you can use Javascript to accomplish that by saving a variable.

Once you have saved the form for your Person node, you’ll get redirected to something like http://mysite.dev/node/887 where 887 is the node ID for your content. The storeEval command lets you save the ID number to a variable that we can access later in our tests. See the image below:

Katalon Recorder covers a lot of bases. Whether you're using just the Record option for building basic spot-checks, or combining advanced features to create rigorous and complex functional testing, it's surprising what can be achieved in so little time — especially given KR's very tenable learning curve. While the examples above are exceedingly simple, in some recent projects we’ve combined thousands of commands across dozens of test cases that provide thorough regression testing and automated QA — and it all started with the click of a Record button.

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Web Wash: Getting Started with Bootstrap 4 using Radix in Drupal 8

Tue, 2019/03/26 - 11:30am

Radix is a Bootstrap 4 powered theme which is set up out-of-the-box to compile the Bootstrap library locally. It is targeted towards advance front-end developers who want total control on how Bootstrap is loaded and comes with Browsersync and Font Awesome built-in. The theme doesn’t support loading Bootstrap via a CDN out-of-the-box. I’d recommend you look at the Barrio theme if you prefer to load everything through a CDN.

Because you’re compiling Bootstrap, you get the added benefit of being able to modify the _variables.scss which is used to customize Bootstrap and can control what SASS components get imported. By importing only what you need you can drastically reduce the size of the compiled CSS file.

The theme comes with a Drush command (Drush 8 only), drush radix "Theme name", which makes it easy to generate sub-themes. The sub-theme comes with a package.json which has all the required packages.

Just run npm install, then npm run dev to compile Bootstrap. It uses laravel-mix to compile everything so you don’t have to spend time configuring webpack files.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to install Radix, create a sub-theme, how to compiling everything and learn about Radix Layouts.

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Phase2: Find Us at DrupalCon Seattle

Mon, 2019/03/25 - 3:02pm

Our annual pilgrimage to Drupalcon is just two weeks away and we are very excited for another unforgettable conference filled with community momentum, thought leadership, and partnership. With several sessions, summits, tracks, and booths to visit this year, I thought I would highlight some key places to find some of Phase2's finest at the conference!

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Digital Echidna: Thoughts on all things digital: New Search Overrides Module

Mon, 2019/03/25 - 1:03pm
You can make the most elegant, relevance-based site search appliance possible -- but, still, sometimes you’re going to want to ‘game’ the system. Manipulating site search results sounds nefarious, but really it’s all about providing the most…
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Agiledrop.com Blog: Top 11 non-Drupal business events to attend in 2019

Fri, 2019/03/22 - 2:08pm

Each year, there’s a plethora of various tech and business events all over the world, even if we disregard the numerous Drupal events. But how do you find the ones that you or your agency would really profit from attending? We made a list of our favorites to help you find the right one(s) for you - check it out!

READ MORE
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Tandem's Drupal Blog: Writing a Drupal 8 Table to Table Migration Path

Fri, 2019/03/22 - 1:00am
March 22, 2019 Occasionally there may be times where you need to migrate a contrib module's database table or your own schema's data to Drupal 8. Use Case For This Effort I previously wrote about handling an upgrade path for modules that don't have a Drupal 8 migration path yet. That works well when your module has a Drupal 8 entity alread...
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Agaric Collective: Show and Tell with Agaric - Sharing Work with Other Coops

Thu, 2019/03/21 - 9:03pm

Agaric hosts a weekly online gathering known as Show and Tell. Participants share tips and tricks we have learned and pose questions to other developers on tasks or projects we are working on. Each week we ask people to send us a little info on what they would like to present. This is not a prerequisite, just a suggestion. Having advance notice of presentations allows us to get the word out to others that may be interested, but you can just show up, and there will most likely be time to present for 5-10 minutes. Sign onto the Show and Tell mailing list and be notified of upcoming Show and Tell events.

Recently we have opened up the Show and Tell chat to bond with other cooperatives that do web development work. Agaric was contacted by members of Fiqus.coop in Argentina as they had started an initiative to meet other cooperative developers and share values and goals. No one had sent notice of a presentation, so we switched the topic of the chat to be more of a meet and greet to get to know each other better with the goal in mind to be able to share our work on projects. The value of the meeting was immediately apparent as we delved into conversation with a few members of Fiqus.

Next, we invited more developers to take part in the discussion, and the doors were opened to share more deeply and connect. This week our meeting was over the top! Nicolas Dimarco led us through a short presentation of slides that revealed a  Federated process and workflow to share development with members of multiple cooperatives. The plan is so simple that everyone immediately understood and the conversation that ensued was compelling, and the questions were indicative of where we need to educate each other about cooperative principles vs. corporate tactics. We need more discussion on trust and friendship. There are so many developers in corporate jobs that have asked me how a web development cooperative works and how does a project run without a manager. I first explain that projects do have managers, but they are managing the work, not the people. Taking time to get to know each other's skills and passions about programming is a core part of being able to work together in a Federation. Fiqus.coop has made it plain and simple for all to see the path to sharing work on projects!

Here is a link to the video recording of the chat where Nicolas Dimarco of Fiqus.coop presents the formula for federated work among cooperatives. Here is a link to the notes from the meeting on 3/20/2019 and some past Show and Tell meetings.

More information on Show and Tell.

Some Drupal shops already work together on projects and we can help that grow by sharing our experiences.  We would love to hear about the ways you work and the processes you have discovered that make sharing work on projects a success!

 

Read more and discuss at agaric.coop.

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Sooper Drupal Themes: Drupal community

Thu, 2019/03/21 - 5:59pm
The value that the community brings to the development of Drupal

Drupal is known for the community that it has amassed as an open source software. But what is the value that the community brings to the development of Drupal?

First off, drupal is an open source CMS. What that means is that everybody can download and mingle with it. Because of this, Drupal has gathered a community of supportive members. Soon, the community has started to actively contribute with code and ways to further developed and improve Drupal. Drupal has more than 42,000 modules that were developed by the community. On top of that, regular security issues are discovered and fixed by the members in their own free time. Also, users are taking their time to answer questions posted on forums by new members to guide them in the Drupal world. This has led Drupal to be known as one of the most active, helpful, dedicated and loyal communities in the world.

Photo's DrupalCon Nashville 2018 copyright Amazee Labs

We all come together at DrupalCon

So where do the members of the community spend their time when not sitting in front a of a screen coding?

Well, the biggest event of the year is the DrupalCon. Every year it takes place in another location. With two conventions scheduled for 2019, one in sleepless Seattle and the other in incredible Amsterdam, DrupalCon is sure to gather a big crowd this year. Activities which are scheduled include keynotes with inspiring figures from inside and outside the community, trainings, summits, birds of a feather meetings and diverse social events.

DrupalCon is a great opportunity to meet and connect with new people, while acquiring more knowledge about Drupal and the direction it's heading in. On top of that, there is a chance of engaging into conversation with highly skilled people with expert knowledge in their domain, which can guide you and give you tips and tricks on what to do. So, if you’re a Drupal enthusiast, be sure to grab a ticket, pack your luggage and join the biggest Drupal social event of the year.

Photo's Drupal Camp Vienna 2015 copyright Amazee Labs

Cosy get-togethers in Drupal Camps

Now that we talked about the biggest social event of the year, Drupalcon, we can take a look at what the Drupal community is doing for the rest of the year. The community also organises smaller events, throughout the year, for regional groups of people. These meetings are more frequent than the DrupalCons. The activities which are undertaken in those camps are usually talks held by speakers on different subjects of interest to the community. The camps also offer training talks for beginners. The main focus of these type of events is to find out more about Drupal, share your Drupal experience and also to meet the local Drupal community.

List upcoming Drupal camps: Name of the Camp Date Location Nerd Summit 2019 16-17.03.2019 United States, Amherst MidCamp 2019 20-23.03.2019 United States, Chicago Frone End Accesibility Summit 08.04.2019 United States, Seattle DrupalCamp Spain 6-12.05.2019 Spain, Conil de la Frontera Drupaldelphia 10.05.2019 United States, Philadelphia Secure Open Source Day - Haarlem Edition 11.05.2019 Netherlands, Haarlem Stanford DrupalCamp 17-18.05.2019 United States, Stanford Frontend United 17-18.05.2019 Netherlands, Utrecht DrupalCamp Belarus 17-18.05.2019 Belarus, Minsk DrupalCamp Kyiv 25-26.05.2019 Ukraine, Kyiv Flyover Camp 31-02.06.2019 United States, Kansas City DrupalCamp Poland 31-02.06.2019 Poland, Wrocław Drupal Developer Days 10-14.06.2019 Romania, Cluj-Napoca Save the Date - Design 4 Drupal Boston 26-28.06.2019 United States, Cambridge DrupalCamp Asheville 2019 12-14.07.2019 United States, Asheville DrupalCamp Colorado 02-04.08.2019 United States, Denver Cornell DrupalCamp 26-27.09.2019 United States, Ithaca DrupalSouth Hobart 27-29.11.2019 Australia, Hobart How are new Drupal users integrated?

Now that we know how the Drupal community likes to spend its time, we can have a look at how the newcomers are being integrated in the community. First, the newbies can attend training sessions which are held on multiple occasions over the course of the year, with different locations. So, if you’re getting an interest in Drupal but don’t know where to start, you can search for the nearest Drupal beginner onboarding camp to find more about Drupal and the Drupal community. On top of that, you can also rely on the Drupal community forums by posting questions there and letting a more experienced user answer your question.

Community spotlight photo collection, indidual images' rights belong to their respectful owners. Collage created by Sooperthemes and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.

Drupal community spotlight

Drupals open source means that everybody can get involved, making the community vibrant and full of inspirational stories. The community has the spotlight section where there are numerous articles about different members of the community and their journey from being a beginner to a well respected member and contributor.

Ildephonse Bikino

Another inspiring story is that of Ildephonse Bikino. He discovered Drupal through his job. He had the opportunity to attend the DrupalCon from 2016 held in New Orleans via a scholarship provided by the Drupal Association. There, he saw the opportunities that the open source software can bring. This led him to host his first Drupal Global Training Day in Rwanda, where he was expecting a number of 50 atendees. However, to his surprise, this number quickly grew and he had a list of 388 participants. Not wanting to turn his back on the Drupal enthusiasts he rose to the challenge and transformed a one day training into eight sessions spread across multiple weekends. This way, he made sure that every Drupal enthusiast received a proprer training. His dedication to the cause is what makes him a trully inspiring person and gives us a reason to tell his story.

Kevin Thull

Another great spotlight is the one about Kevin Thull. He got involved into Drupal through freelancing and started really getting involved with the community by the time the book Using Drupal 6 came out. He is known for being the mastermind behind the recording of the different Drupal events. He started recording drupal camps back in 2013. At first, everybody questioned his decision, however, he stayed true to his belief, that it is important to record those events. To date, he is personally responsible for recording over 800 sessions and giving up countless of hours of his time to achieve this feat. He was awarded with the Aaron Winborn Award in 2018 for his contribution to the Drupal community.

Rachel Olivero

For example, we have the case of Rachel Olivero which has recently passed away. She first started getting involved with the community at the DrupalCon 2017 in her hometown of Baltimore, where she participated for the first time in a code sprint and also reported her first bug. She was engaging constantly with the community on social platforms. As a blind person, she led an accesibility breakthrough at DrupalCon Nashville. She was always sharing her knowledge and expertise regarding this topic. Her aim was to make life easier for the users with disabilities. She understood the importance of diversity and so she was also engaged with the Drupal Diversity and Inclusion Team. Although she was part of the community for a short period of time, she left her mark through her actions and her contributions.

Aaron Winborn and the award named after him

The Aaron Winborn Award, also known as the “Academy Award” of the Drupal Association is an honor given to the members of the Drupal community that show personal integrity, kindness and an above-and-beyond commitment to the community. It was named in the honor of Aaron Winborn, a big community contributor which passed away after losing a battle with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. A specific disease which causes the death of the neurons that are controlling voluntary muscles. In order to remember the contribution which Aaron Winbord has brought to the Drupal community, the award was named after him after his death in 2015. To date, the award was given to 4 people which had a big contribution to the community and namely Cathy Theys, Gábor Hojtsy, Nikki Stevens and Kevin Thull. Right now, the nominations for the next awarding are open, so be sure to nominate your favourite member of the Drupal community.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the community is of utmost importance to the development of Drupal. The community is what keeps the CMS alive, while also in a costant state of evolution. Drupal has made it possible for people of different cultural backgrounds to cooperate and stand united for the same cause.  This reflects well on the unofficial motto ,"Come for the code, stay for the community".

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Palantir: Federated Search v2.0

Thu, 2019/03/21 - 3:46pm
Federated Search v2.0 brandt Thu, 03/21/2019 - 09:46 Ken Rickard Mar 21, 2019

We have released version 2.0 of our Federated Search application and Drupal integration.

Since our initial release, we’ve been doing agile, iterative development on the software. Working with our partners at the University of Michigan and the State of Georgia, we’ve made refinements to both the application and the Drupal integration.

Better search results

Default searches now target the entire index and not the more narrow tm_rendered_item field. This change allows Solr admins to have better control over the refinement of search results, including the use of field boosting and elevate.xml query enhancements.

Autocomplete search results

We added support for search autocomplete at both the application and Drupal block levels -- and the two can use the same or different data sources to populate results. We took a configurable approach to autocomplete, which supports “search as you type” completion of partial text. These results can also include keyboard navigation for accessibility.

Since the Drupal block is independent of the React application, we made it configurable so that the block can have a distinct API endpoint from the application. We did this because the state of Georgia has specific requirements that their default search behavior should be to search the local site first, looking for items marked with a special “highlighted content” field.

Wildcard searching

We fully support wildcard searches as a configuration option, so that a search for “run” will automatically pass “run” and “run*” as search terms.

Default facet control

The default facets sets for the application -- Site, Content Type, and Date Range -- can now be disabled on a per-site basis. This feature is useful for sites that contribute content to a network but only wish to search their own site’s content.

Enhanced query parameters

We’ve added additional support for term-based facets to be passed from the search query string. This means that all facet options except dates can be passed directly via external URL before loading the search form.

Better Drupal theming

We split the module’s display into proper theme templates for the block and it’s form, and we added template suggestions for each form element so that themes can easily enhance or override the default styling of the Drupal block. We also removed some overly opinionated CSS from the base style of the application. This change should allow CSS overrides to have better control over element styling.

What’s Next for Users?

All of these changes should be backward compatible for existing users, though minor changes to the configuration may be required, Users of the Drupal 8.x-2.0 release will need to run the Drupal update script to load the new default settings. Sites that override CSS should confirm that they address the new styles.

Currently, the changes only apply to Drupal 8 sites. We’ll be backporting the new features to Drupal 7 in the upcoming month.

Users of the 1.0 release may continue to use both the existing Drupal module and their current JS and CSS files until the end of 2019. We recommend upgrading to the 2.0 versions of both, which requires minor CSS and configuration changes you can read about in the upgrade documentation.

Special Thanks

Palantir senior engineer Jes Constantine worked through the most significant changes to the application and integration code. Senior front-end developer Nate Striedinger worked through the template design and CSS. And engineer Matt Carmichael provided QA and code review. And a special shoutout to James Sansbury of Lullabot -- our first external contributor.

Development Drupal Open Source
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Wim Leers: JSON:API shipping with Drupal 8.7!

Thu, 2019/03/21 - 2:20pm

The JSON:API module was added to Drupal 8.7 as a stable module!

See Dries’ overview of why this is an important milestone for Drupal, a look behind the scenes and a look toward the future. Read that first!

Upgrading?

As Mateu said, this is the first time a new module is added to Drupal core as “stable” (non-experimental) from day one. This was the plan since July 2018 — I’m glad we delivered on that promise.

This means users of the JSON:API 8.x-2.x contrib module currently on Drupal 8.5 or 8.6 can update to Drupal 8.7 on its release day and simply delete their current contributed module, and have no disruption in their current use of JSON:API, nor in security coverage! 1

What’s happened lately?

The last JSON:API update was exactly two months ago, because … ever since then Gabe, Mateu and I are have been working very hard to get JSON:API through the core review process. This resulted in a few notable improvements:

  1. a read-only mode that is turned on by default for new installs — this strikes a nice balance between DX (still having data available via APIs by default/zero config: reading is probably the 80% use case, at least today) and minimizing risk (not allowing writes by default) 2
  2. auto-revisioning when PATCHing for eligible entity types
  3. formally documented & tested revisions and translations support 3
  4. formally documented security considerations

Get these improvements today by updating to version 2.4 of the JSON:API module — it’s identical to what was added to Drupal 8.7!

Contributors

An incredible total of 103 people contributed in JSON:API’s issue queue to help make this happen, and 50 of those even have commits to their name:

Wim Leers, ndobromirov, e0ipso, nuez, gabesullice, xjm, effulgentsia, seanB, jhodgdon, webchick, Dries, andrewmacpherson, jibran, larowlan, Gábor Hojtsy, benjifisher, phenaproxima, ckrina, dww, amateescu, voleger, plach, justageek, catch, samuel.mortenson, berdir, zhangyb, killes@www.drop.org, malik.kotob, pfrilling, Grimreaper, andriansyahnc, blainelang, btully, ebeyrent, garphy, Niklan, joelstein, joshua.boltz, govind.maloo, tstoeckler, hchonov, dawehner, kristiaanvandeneynde, dagmar, yobottehg, olexyy.mails@gmail.com, keesee, caseylau, peterdijk, mortona2k, jludwig, pixelwhip, abhisekmazumdar, izus, Mile23, mglaman, steven.wichers, omkar06, haihoi2, axle_foley00, hampercm, clemens.tolboom, gargsuchi, justafish, sonnykt, alexpott, jlscott, DavidSpiessens, BR0kEN, danielnv18, drpal, martin107, balsama, nileshlohar, gerzenstl, mgalalm, tedbow, das-peter, pwolanin, skyredwang, Dave Reid, mstef, bwinett, grndlvl, Spleshka, salmonek, tom_ek, huyby, mistermoper, jazzdrive3, harrrrrrr, Ivan Berezhnov, idebr, mwebaze, dpolant, dravenk, alan_blake, jonathan1055, GeduR, kostajh, pcambra, meba, dsdeiz, jian he, matthew.perry.

Thanks to all of you!

Future JSON:API blogging

I blogged about once a month since October 2018 about JSON:API, to get more people to switch to version 2.x of the JSON:API module, to ensure it was maximally mature and bug free prior to going into Drupal core. New capabilities were also being added at a pretty high pace because we’d been preparing the code base for that months prior. We went from ~1700 installs in January to ~2700 today!

Now that it is in Drupal core, there will be less need for frequent updates, and I think the API-First Drupal: what’s new in 8.next? blog posts that I have been doing probably make more sense. I will do one of those when Drupal 8.7.0 is released in May, because not only will it ship with JSON:API land, there are also other improvements!

Special thanks to Mateu Aguiló Bosch (e0ipso) for their feedback!

  1. We’ll of course continue to provide security releases for the contributed module. Once Drupal 8.7 is released, the Drupal Security Team stops supporting Drupal 8.5. At that time, the JSON:API contributed module will only need to provide security support for Drupal 8.6. Once Drupal 8.8 is released at the end of 2019, the JSON:API contributed module will no longer be supported: since JSON:API will then be part of both Drupal 8.7 and 8.8, there is no reason for the contributed module to continue to be supported. ↩︎

  2. Existing sites will continue to have writes enabled by default, but can choose to enable the read-only mode too. ↩︎

  3. Limitations in the underlying Drupal core APIs prevent JSON:API from 100% of desired capabilities, but with JSON:API now being in core, it’ll be much easier to make the necessary changes happen! ↩︎

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Specbee: Drupal 8 & B2All: A New Brand of Strategies for B2B & B2C Marketers

Thu, 2019/03/21 - 11:53am

With robust and flexible infrastructure, innovative design and some great out of the box features, Drupal CMS is one of the top web solutions considered by businesses around the world to stay abreast with the surge in demand for personalization, interactivity and scalable tools. However, it turns out that a lot of marketers are quite unfamiliar with Drupal's potential.

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myDropWizard.com: SA-CORE-2019-004 doesn't affect Drupal 6

Wed, 2019/03/20 - 10:43pm

As you may know, Drupal 6 has reached End-of-Life (EOL) which means the Drupal Security Team is no longer doing Security Advisories or working on security patches for Drupal 6 core or contrib modules - but the Drupal 6 LTS vendors are and we're one of them!

Today, there is a Moderately Critical security release for Drupal core to fix a Cross Site Scripting (XSS) vulnerability.

Folks have been asking us, so this is just a short note to say that this issue does NOT affect Drupal 6. So, you can focus just on updating your Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 sites today. :-)

Thanks!

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