clemens-tolboom opened a pull request in ericyangyu/PPO-for-Beginners

On github - Mon, 2021/02/08 - 1:39pm
clemens-tolboom opened a pull request in ericyangyu/PPO-for-Beginners Feb 8, 2021 Make long numbers more readable. #5

This maybe a nitpick but I like 200 million instead of 2e8 better. Feel free to close

+1 -1

clemens-tolboom pushed to master in clemens-tolboom/PPO-for-Beginners

On github - Mon, 2021/02/08 - 1:34pm
clemens-tolboom pushed to master in clemens-tolboom/PPO-for-Beginners Feb 8, 2021 2 commits to master

DrupalEasy: Easily remove the "Request new password" functionality

Planet Drupal - Mon, 2021/02/08 - 10:00am

This may be the quickest quicktip we've ever written - if your site doesn't require the "Request new password" functionality, the No Request New Password module makes it pretty easy to remove it. 

Before:

After:

Also - the module doesn't just hide the "Request new password" link, it removes the functionality completely, so if a user navigates directly to /user/password, they'll be redirected back to the login page. 

Categories:

MidCamp - Midwest Drupal Camp: Community Onboarding Day: A new virtual “welcome table”

Planet Drupal - Sun, 2021/02/07 - 11:52pm
Community Onboarding Day: A new virtual “welcome table”

Edit: After publishing, and based on community feedback, we've modified our naming slightly. "Community Day" is now "Community Onboarding Day".

At every pre-pandemic MidCamp attendees were welcomed by a team of volunteers with shirts and badges and stickers and funny hats and answers to every question possible. Our 2020 event had a few warm human moments, like when a room moderator asked 100+ people to come off mute simultaneously before our opening remarks, but ultimately recreating the human-ness of our prior events in a virtual setting proved challenging. This was not only draining for prior attendees but challenging for new community members.

This year, our new “Community Onboarding Day” sets out to provide a more human on-ramp by:

  1. introducing new community members to the product, the community, and the kinds of conversations that will go on during the event, and 
  2. engaging all attendees in planning the event itself.

In our prior post, we began to define our audience. We’ll begin community day with a morning of short talks and discussions split up into three audience-specific tracks:

  • I’m new to Drupal: these discussions could include a review of the tools on Drupal.org, learning opportunities around the community, or a panel of folks discussing why they’ve stuck around the community.
  • I do Drupal, I’m new to the community: Many folks Drupal, but not every Drupaler knows how they can leverage our incredible community. Here we’ll talk about issue queues, documentation, and novice contribution opportunities.
  • I do Drupal, I’m involved in the community: This group could discuss Drupal core initiatives, triage Contribution Day tasks, or review mentoring opportunities.

If you’re interested in presenting or have a request for a topic, please comment on this Drupal.org issue.

In the second half of Community Onboarding Day, we’ll open the “Call for Activities/Topics” for our Thursday and Friday Unconference. 

  • Thursday will be focused on building relationships in the community through social events, games, and lightning talks, and other activities that are welcoming to all.
  • Friday will take more of a traditional Unconference schedule, with Birds of a Feather (BoF) discussions and more.

To encourage diversity in discussions, we’ll also be holding a workshop for marginalized, underrepresented, and historically excluded speakers on Wednesday afternoon. 

So, that’s Community Onboarding Day. With it, we hope to:

  • give new attendees the confidence to bring a topic or activity to the table,
  • give everyone a plan of what they can expect for the next two days,
  • provide opportunities for connection and mentorship.

In the end, this MidCamp we’re encouraging all attendees to:

  • come as you are, 
  • bring your excitement and ideas, 
  • plan for lots of opportunities to engage, and 
  • feel free to step away as you need.
Categories:

MidCamp - Midwest Drupal Camp: Community Day: A new virtual “welcome table”

Planet Drupal - Sun, 2021/02/07 - 11:52pm
Community Day: A new virtual “welcome table”

At every pre-pandemic MidCamp attendees were welcomed by a team of volunteers with shirts and badges and stickers and funny hats and answers to every question possible. Our 2020 event had a few warm human moments, like when a room moderator asked 100+ people to come off mute simultaneously before our opening remarks, but ultimately recreating the human-ness of our prior events in a virtual setting proved challenging. This was not only draining for prior attendees but challenging for new community members.

This year, our new “Community Day” sets out to provide a more human on-ramp by:

  1. introducing new community members to the product, the community, and the kinds of conversations that will go on during the event, and 
  2. engaging all attendees in planning the event itself.

In our prior post, we began to define our audience. We’ll begin community day with a morning of short talks and discussions split up into three audience-specific tracks:

  • I’m new to Drupal: these discussions could include a review of the tools on Drupal.org, learning opportunities around the community, or a panel of folks discussing why they’ve stuck around the community.
  • I do Drupal, I’m new to the community: Many folks Drupal, but not every Drupaler knows how they can leverage our incredible community. Here we’ll talk about issue queues, documentation, and novice contribution opportunities.
  • I do Drupal, I’m involved in the community: This group could discuss Drupal core initiatives, triage Contribution Day tasks, or review mentoring opportunities.

If you’re interested in presenting or have a request for a topic, please comment on this Drupal.org issue.

In the second half of Community Day, we’ll open the “Call for Activities/Topics” for our Thursday and Friday Unconference. 

  • Thursday will be focused on building relationships in the community through social events, games, and lightning talks, and other activities that are welcoming to all.
  • Friday will take more of a traditional Unconference schedule, with Birds of a Feather (BoF) discussions and more.

To encourage diversity in discussions, we’ll also be holding a workshop for marginalized, underrepresented, and historically excluded speakers on Wednesday afternoon. 

So, that’s Community Day. With it, we hope to:

  • give new attendees the confidence to bring a topic or activity to the table,
  • give everyone a plan of what they can expect for the next two days,
  • provide opportunities for connection and mentorship.

In the end, this MidCamp we’re encouraging all attendees to:

  • come as you are, 
  • bring your excitement and ideas, 
  • plan for lots of opportunities to engage, and 
  • feel free to step away as you need.
Categories:

Ny Media: Why we decided to migrate from Travis to Github Actions, and why you should consider doing the same

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2021/02/05 - 12:46pm
Why we decided to migrate from Travis to Github Actions, and why you should consider doing the same jakub February 5, 2021

At Ny Media we’re quality-oriented and our main objective is to provide secure and reliable solutions, giving our clients all tools they need to run successful online projects. To ensure the quality of solutions and meeting the client’s acceptance criteria we’re developing test cases to cover all critical parts of their business logic. In order to achieve this, we are facilitating different testing frameworks, just to name a few:

  • PHPUnit - for unit testing
  • PHPStan - for static code analysis
  • Behat - for user-story testing and acceptance criteria

This is not a complete list (that’s material for a separate blogpost) but should at least provide some perspective on what is our testing stack which varies between different projects.

Travis CI

For many years we were using travis-ci.com, which is a paid version of travis-ci.org - the popular among FOSS (free and open-source software) maintainers, a continuous integration platform, that allows running customized test cases on your private Github repositories. For us, one of the reasons to become paying customer of Travis is to support the company that was promoting FOSS. Many of us, developers here at Ny Media, were using Travis on daily basis for our own open-source side-projects, so integrating Travis into our company workflow was the only logical thing at that time.
Unfortunately, lately, Travis became highly unreliable both to their customers but also their own employees. They have also made it impossible for FOSS maintainers to keep using their services. Therefore we decided it’s time for a change.

Github Actions

Since we’re using Github as our main remote git repository, the natural choice for us was to explore Github CI (aka Github Actions) capabilities. Github has been working hard the last couple of years since the initial announcement of Github Actions to provide everyone with access to their product.

I’d like to name a couple of features that immediately caught our eyes:

  1. GitHub-hosted runners
    You don’t need a custom infrastructure to run your tests - Github can provide it for you at a reasonable price. All our tests are running on linux-based platforms and the price, at the time this blog post was created, is 0.008 USD per minute. There is some package of minutes included in your Github plan. Moreover, all public repositories are free to run Github Actions!
  2. Self-hosted runners
    You can run your tests on Github infrastructure or use your own infrastructure - either physical or virtual. And the best part is - you don’t need to pay extra for utilizing that infrastructure as a Github test runner
  3. .“Unlimited” concurrency
    The number varies depends on your plan but it is quite generous even for Free accounts (20 concurrent runners). At the time of writing this blogpost Travis charges 249 USD for 5 concurrent runners.
  4. Powerful infrastructure
    A few years back Github was acquired by Microsoft, and as a side effect of this acquisition, it got access to cloud infrastructure - Azure. Therefore they can provide a quite powerful infrastructure at reasonable prices making it hard to beat.
  5. Exceptional documentation and support
    Github is quite great at documenting all features regarding the new platform. Even if the moment of doubts I’ve been able to reach out to the support team and get my answers within the same day.
Migration

Since our tests on Travis were running within a dockerized environment and not directly on the worker instance, we were able to finish the migration within one day. It required the following steps few steps.

Create .github/workflows/test.yaml file

Here’s the example file you can use as a template:

name: Run tests on: push: branches: - develop - master pull_request: branches: - develop - master jobs: build: name: Run tests runs-on: ubuntu-latest timeout-minutes: 20 steps: - uses: actions/checkout@v2 - run: /bin/bash run-tests.sh

In the example above run-tests.sh script represents all the steps your test suite requires to execute. It may need to build dockerized environment, it may need to download all dependencies, run test scripts, it’s up to you. In our case it all the above.

I want to highlight 2 things in the template above. This workflow will only be triggered when you push to branches master and develop or if you open a Pull Request against those 2 branches and push some commits to the branch associated with such Pull Request.
Here’s what you’ll be seeing in your Pull Requests

You can see 2 steps being run as a part of this job. Please mind the difference betwee keywords used for each of those steps. The run marks what script or sequence of commands should be run on your runner host.  The uses provides a way of utilizing from the whole marketplace of pre-cooked actions. The one used in the template - actions/checkout@v2 - is provided directly by the Github team. It allows your project to be cloned in a certain directory (by default the current one) and the commit which triggered the build will be checked out. Very simple, yet powerful - more about it in our future blogposts.

Make sure checks passed before merging the Pull Request

Do that by setting up the protected branch in repository Settings -> Branches


Disable Travis

Now that your tests are running using Github CI you can safely remove all references to Travis in 3 easy steps:

  1. Cancel your plan. If you’re paying for Travis just go to https://travis-ci.com/plans and switch to plan Free.
  2. Go to https://github.com/organizations/yourorganization/settings/installations and remove the Travis App
  3. Delete .travis.yml from all repositories that you used to test with Travis. You don’t need that anymore.
Summary

Are we happy with the migration? Yes, very much so. Without making any change to how we run tests (initially, we started with 1:1 test migration from Travis to Github CI) our test times were decreased by ~20% due to much more powerful test runners on Github vs. Travis. In addition, Travis was limiting us to a certain amount of runners that can run concurrently (depending on pricing plan). That restriction was increased by the order of magnitude when we migrated to Github CI, giving our developers much quicker feedback. On top of that, despite the increased performance, we’re actually paying less for using Github CI compared to Travis.

But this is not the end of this story. We have barely scratched the surface of possibilities when it comes to utilizing Github CI API. In the next blog post, we’ll talk about what can you do to further improve your workflow and optimize time spent on testing. Stay tuned.

 

Categories:

Evolving Web: Drupal, Two Decades Later

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2021/02/04 - 7:58pm

On January 15, 2021, Drupal turned 20! I was so busy helping with the official press release that I missed the date to write my own take on the big day.

Drupal has a classic origin story: an open source platform (originally a bulletin board) that started in Dries Buytaart’s dorm room in the Netherlands, and quickly grew into a global phenomenon, attracting developers from around the world to contribute to and use Drupal.

📺 Need a primer? Have a colleague who'd like to know what Drupal's all about? Join us February 17 for a free 2-hour intro to Drupal webinar.

Back in the day

If you take yourself back to January 15, 2001, this was the same day that Wikipedia was founded, before the rise of Google, before wifi was available everywhere you went, and before cat videos were popular online.

Drupal emerged as a new model for building a website.

In contrast to the competitive atmosphere of the dotcom era, open source and Drupal in particular showed a more friendly and collaborative way of building and sharing tools to publish content online. As contributors rushed to write Wikipedia articles to contribute to the world’s open knowledge repository, developers were eager to contribute to Drupal so that websites would work better.

Drupal pioneered features like taxonomy and a flexible, configurable content model. Multilingual came out of the box in the second release.

Look at us now

Over the years, massive organizations started adopting Drupal, and today it’s used for some of the most ambitious digital projects by governments, institutions, non-profits, and companies around the world, from the UN to Tesla.

How Drupal changed my life

My own Drupal journey started in 2008, as I was looking for the best platform to build multilingual websites for our clients here in Montreal. It was a pleasure to use a system that was actually designed to handle more than one language.

Smiling faces at DrupalCamp Montreal 2018, one of many Drupal-related events we've sponsored and contributed to over the years

And right away, as we started adopting Drupal for more and more projects, I was caught up in the excitement about what was possible. I remember spending months creating a Ruby on Rails app, and then rebuilding it in a couple of days using Drupal.

As a “self-taught developer”, I got so much out of the open source practice of sharing knowledge, best practices, and code. I am continually amazed by how the open source community works, and how features make their way into Drupal before I realize we need them. 

The future is friendly

The truth is that a flexible CMS can be hard to use, because there are just so many options built in. The Drupal community has always been hesitant to assume what the site builder wanted to do, so that you can turn Drupal into whatever you need it to be.

But recent updates, particularly the Umami, demo, the Claro admin theme, a built-in Media Library and content moderation workflows, have made huge improvements to the core content editing experience.

📚 Read next: Drupal 8 vs Drupal 9: more features for content editors

In Drupal 9 demos and training, users have been impressed by the simplicity and friendliness of the authoring experience, and I know that there’s more we can do to design better defaults to improve this experience and make the update process easier for non-developers. And I’m thrilled to see that that’s exactly what’s on the roadmap for Drupal in the coming months and years.

How can we do better?

I hope that the future of Drupal is also more diverse, because we need a diverse community to build the future web.

I think that there are lots of things we do right: having many organizations around the world contribute to Drupal, for instance, and prioritizing accessibility so that content—and Drupal’s content editing tools themselves—are available to a wider audience.

But we have so much to do to proactively build a truly inclusive community. As Drupal has shown what large-scale open source code contribution can look like, we can also lead the effort to make open source more inclusive.

Drupal’s 20th birthday inspires me.

That we can build such a valuable resource collectively, and continually build something better as a community is awe-inspiring. Let’s keep going! Reach out to us (we’re @evolvingweb on Twitter!) if you have ideas for how to take Drupal to the next level—or, better yet, check out the Promote Drupal initiative to help spread the word about our favourite open source CMS.

+ more awesome articles by Evolving Web
Categories:

Agiledrop.com Blog: Top Drupal blog posts from January 2021

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2021/02/04 - 8:23am

This January was a particularly exciting time for the Drupal community, with the open-source project celebrating its 20th birthday.

READ MORE
Categories:

myDropWizard.com: Drupal 6 Long-Term Support Extended to 2023 - and What About Drupal 7?

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2021/02/04 - 6:55am

One more year? Sure. Why not!?

When we originally announced that we'd be providing Drupal 6 Long-Term Support, we committed to supporting our customers until at least February 2017.

We've made pretty regular announcements in the past extending things far beyond that original end-date.

Today, we're announcing that we'll be extending our Drupal 6 Long-Term Support (D6LTS) until at least February 2023!

Categories:

clemens-tolboom closed an issue in boku-ilen/geodot-plugin

On github - Wed, 2021/02/03 - 3:43pm
clemens-tolboom closed an issue in boku-ilen/geodot-plugin Feb 3, 2021 Navigating RasterDemo is little weird #53

Right click release makes scene jump back and more weird mouse rotations We should add FPS player instead.

2 comments

clemens-tolboom commented on issue boku-ilen/geodot-plugin#53

On github - Wed, 2021/02/03 - 3:43pm
clemens-tolboom commented on issue boku-ilen/geodot-plugin#53 Feb 3, 2021 clemens-tolboom commented Feb 3, 2021

So we can close this ... I expected auto close due to commit message "Fixes #53" ... not sure why that was not happening.

clemens-tolboom pushed to master in KennisnetwerkDataScience/Wifi-punten-in-Leeuwarden

On github - Wed, 2021/02/03 - 3:39pm
clemens-tolboom pushed to master in KennisnetwerkDataScience/Wifi-punten-in-Leeuwarden Feb 3, 2021 2 commits to master
  • e0735b4 Merge pull request #14 from KennisnetwerkDataScience/dependabot/pip/G…
  • b08d0c1 Bump tensorflow from 2.3.1 to 2.4.0 in /Groep 5

clemens-tolboom merged a pull request in KennisnetwerkDataScience/Wifi-punten-in-Leeuwarden

On github - Wed, 2021/02/03 - 3:39pm
clemens-tolboom merged a pull request in KennisnetwerkDataScience/Wifi-punten-in-Leeuwarden Feb 3, 2021 Bump tensorflow from 2.3.1 to 2.4.0 in /Groep 5 #14

Bumps tensorflow from 2.3.1 to 2.4.0. Release notes Sourced from tensorflow's releases. TensorFlow 2.4.0 Release 2.4.0 Major Features and Improve…

+1 -1

clemens-tolboom pushed to master in clemens-tolboom/tf-mnist

On github - Wed, 2021/02/03 - 3:37pm
clemens-tolboom pushed to master in clemens-tolboom/tf-mnist Feb 3, 2021 2 commits to master
  • 953cf09 Merge pull request #10 from clemens-tolboom/dependabot/pip/bleach-3.3.0
  • d3242ba Bump bleach from 3.2.1 to 3.3.0

clemens-tolboom merged a pull request in clemens-tolboom/tf-mnist

On github - Wed, 2021/02/03 - 3:37pm
clemens-tolboom merged a pull request in clemens-tolboom/tf-mnist Feb 3, 2021 Bump bleach from 3.2.1 to 3.3.0 #10

Bumps bleach from 3.2.1 to 3.3.0. Changelog Sourced from bleach's changelog. Version 3.3.0 (February 1st, 2021) Backwards incompatible changes c…

+366 -277