LakeDrops Drupal Consulting, Development and Hosting: Migrate Drupal 6 files to Drupal 8 media entities

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2019/06/27 - 9:48am
Migrate Drupal 6 files to Drupal 8 media entities Richard Papp Thu, 06/27/2019 - 09:48 Drupal 8 already provides the necessary configuration files and PHP plugins to migrate files from Drupal 6. But if you are using the Drupal 8 core media module for your files you need to add a second migration.
Categories:

Palantir: How to Scale Through Design Systems

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2019/06/26 - 8:45pm
How to Scale Through Design Systems brandt Wed, 06/26/2019 - 13:45 Kate Eyler-Werve Jun 26, 2019

A design system gives you a “lego box” of components that you can use to create consistent, beautiful interfaces.

Design System artifacts go by many names - Living Style Guides, Pattern Libraries, UI Libraries, and just plain Design Systems. The core idea is to give digital teams greater flexibility and control over their website. Instead of having to decide exactly what all pages should look like in one big redesign and then sticking with those templates until the next redesign, a design system gives you a “lego box” of components the team can use to create consistent, beautiful interfaces. Component-based design is how you SCALE.

At Palantir we build content management systems, so we’ve named our design system artifact a “style guide” in a nod to the editorial space.

Our style guides are organized into three sections:

  1. 'Design Elements' which are the very basic building blocks for the website.
  2. 'Components' which combine design elements into working pieces of code that serve a defined purpose.
  3. 'Page Templates' which combine the elements and components into page templates that are used to display the content at destination URLs.

But how do we help our clients determine what the list of elements, components and page templates should be?

How to Identify Elements for Your Design System

In this post I’ll walk through how we worked with the University of Miami Health System to create a style guide that enabled the marketing team to build a consistent, branded experience for a system with 1,200 doctors and scientists, three primary locations, and multiple local clinics.

1. Start by generating a list of your most important types of content.

Why are people coming to your site? What content helps them complete the task they are there to do? This content list is ground zero for component ideation: how can design support and elevate the information your site delivers?

The list of content serving user needs is your starting point for components. In addition, we can use this list to identify a few page templates right off the bat:

  • Home page
  • Treatment landing page
  • Search page
  • Listing page: Search results, news, classes
  • Clinical trials landing page
  • Clinical trial detail page
  • Location landing page
  • Appointment landing page
  • Appointment detail page
  • Basic page (About us, contact us, general information)

This is just the start of the UHealth style guide; we ultimately created about 80 components and 17 page templates. But it gives you a sense of how we tackled the challenge!

2. Sort your list of important types of content into groups by similarities.

Visitors should be able to scan your website for the information they need, and distinctive component designs help them differentiate content without having to read every word. In addition, being rigorous about consistently using components for specific kinds of information creates predictable interfaces, and predictable interfaces are easy for your visitors to use.

In this step, you should audit the design and photo assets you have available now, and assess your capacity to create them going forward. If, for example, you have a limited photo library and no graphic artist on staff, you’ll want to choose a set of components that don’t heavily rely on photos and graphics.

In this example, we have three component types: News, Events/Classes, and a Simple Success story.

  1. News Component: This component has no images. This is largely about content management; UHealth publishes a lot of news, and they didn’t want to create a bottleneck in their publishing schedule by requiring each story to have a digital-ready photo.
  2. Events/Classes Component: This component has an option for images or a pattern. Because UHealth wants visitors to take action on this content by signing up, we wanted these to have an eye-catching image. Requiring a photo introduces a potential bottleneck in publishing, so we also gave them the option to make the image a pattern or graphic.
  3. Simple success story: This is the most visually complex component because successful health narratives are an important element of UHealth’s content strategy. We were able to create a complex component here because there’s a smaller number of success stories compared to news stories or classes and events. That means the marketing team can dedicate significant time and resources to making the content for this component as effective as possible.
3. Now that you’ve sorted your list by content, do a cross-check for functionality.

Unlike paper publications, websites are built to enable actions like searching, subscribing, and making appointments. Your component set should include interfaces for your functionality.

Some simple and common functions for the UHealth site included searching for a treatment by letter, map blocks, and step forms.

In a more complex example, the Sylvester Cancer Center included a dynamic “Find a lab” functionality that was powered by a database. We designed the template around the limitations of the data set powering the feature, rather than ideating the ideal interface. Search is another feature that benefits from planning during the design phase.

For example, these components for a side bar location search and a full screen location search require carefully structured databases to support them. The design and technical teams must be in alignment on the capacity and limits of the functionality underlying the interface.

4. Differentiate components by brand.

UHealth is an enormous health care system, and there are several centers of excellence within the system that have their own logos and distinct content strategies. As a result, we created several components that were differentiated by brand.

In this example, you see navigation interfaces that are different by brand and language. Incorporating the differentiated logos for the core UHealth system and the Centers of Excellence is fairly straightforward. But as you can see the Sylvester Center also has three additional top nav options: Cancer treatments, Research, and For Healthcare Professionals.

That content change necessitated a different nav bar - you can see that it’s longer. We also created a component for the nav in Spanish, because sometimes in other languages you find that the menu labels are different lengths and need to be adjusted for. In this case, they didn’t, but we kept it as a reference for the site builders.

5. Review the list: can you combine any components?

Your overall goal should be creating the smallest possible set of components. Depending on the complexity and variety of your content and functionality, this might be a set of 100 components or it might be just 20. The UHealth Design System has about 80 components, and another 17 page templates.

The key is that each of the components does a specific job and is visually differentiated from components that do different jobs. You want clear visual differences that signal clear content differences to your audience, and you don’t want your web team spending time trying to parse minor differences - that’s not how you scale!

In my experience, the biggest stumbling block to creating a streamlined list of components is stakeholders asking for maximum flexibility and control. I’ve found the best way to manage this challenge is to provide stakeholders with the option to differentiate their fiefdoms through content rather than components.

In this example, we have the exact same component featuring different images, which allows for two widely different experiences. You can also enable minor differentiation within a component: maybe you can leave off a sub-head, or allow for two buttons instead of one.

6. Start building your design system and stay flexible.

The list you generated here will get you 80% of the way there, but as you proceed with designing and building your design system, you will almost certainly uncover new component needs. When you do, first double check that you can’t use an existing component. This can be a little tricky, because of course content can essentially be displayed any way you want.

At Palantir, we solve for this challenge by building our Style Guide components with real content. This approach solves for a few key challenges with building a design system:

  1. Showing the “why” of a component. Each component is designed for a specific type of content - news, classes, header, testimonial, directory, etc. This consistency is critical for scaling design: the goal is to create consistent interfaces to create ease of use for your visitors. By building our Style Guides with real content, we document the thought process behind creating a specific component.
  2. Consistency. Digital teams change and grow. We use content in our Style Guide to show your digital team how each component should be used, even if they weren’t a part of the original design process.
  3. Capturing User Testing. Some of our components, like menus, are heavily user-tested to ensure that we’re creating intuitive interfaces. By building the components with the tested content in place, we’re capturing that research and ensuring it goes forward in the design.
  4. Identifying gaps. If you’ve got a piece of content or functionality that you think needs a new component, you can check your assumptions against the Style Guide. Does the content you’re working with actually fit within an existing pattern, or is it really new? If it is, add it to the project backlog!
Outcomes

The most important takeaway here is that design systems let your web team scale. Through the use of design systems, your digital team can generate gorgeous, consistent and branded pages as new needs arise.

But don’t take our word for it! Tauffyt Aguilar, the Executive Director of Digital Solutions for Miller School of Medicine and UHealth, describes the impact of their new design system:

“One of the major improvements is Marketing’s ability to maintain and grow their site moving forward. Previously each page was designed and developed individually. The ability to create or edit pages using various elements and components of the Design System is a significant improvement in the turnaround time and efficiency for the Marketing department.”

My favorite example of a new page constructed with the UHealth design system is this gorgeous interface for the Sports Medicine Institute.

The Sports Medicine audience has unique needs and interests: they are professional and amateur athletes who need to get back in the game. The UHealth team used basic components plus an attention-grabbing image to create this interface for finding experts by issue.

And ultimately, that’s Palantir’s goal: your digital team should have the tools to create gorgeous, effective websites.

Content Strategy Design Industries Healthcare
Categories:

myDropWizard.com: Drupal 6 security update for Advanced Forum module

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2019/06/26 - 6:42pm

As you may know, Drupal 6 has reached End-of-Life (EOL) which means the Drupal Security Team is no longer doing Security Advisories or working on security patches for Drupal 6 core or contrib modules - but the Drupal 6 LTS vendors are and we're one of them!

Today, there is a Critical security release for the Advanced Forum 6.x-2.x module to fix an Cross Site Scripting (XSS) vulnerability.

Advanced Forum builds on and enhances Drupal's core forum module.

The module doesn't sufficiently sanitise user input in specific circumstances relating to the module's default functionality. It is not possible to disable the vulnerable functionality.

This vulnerability is mitigated by the fact that an attacker must have a role with permission to create forum content.

See the security advisory for Drupal 7 for more information.

Here you can download the Drupal 6 patch or the full release.

Note: This only affects Advanced Forum 6.x-2.x -- not 6.x-1.x.

If you have a Drupal 6 site using the Advanced Forum 6.x-2.x module, we recommend you update immediately! We have already deployed the patch for all of our Drupal 6 Long-Term Support clients. :-)

If you'd like all your Drupal 6 modules to receive security updates and have the fixes deployed the same day they're released, please check out our D6LTS plans.

Note: if you use the myDropWizard module (totally free!), you'll be alerted to these and any future security updates, and will be able to use drush to install them (even though they won't necessarily have a release on Drupal.org).

Categories:

InternetDevels: Editorial workflows in Drupal 8: easy creation & management

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2019/06/26 - 4:32pm

Streamlining the content creation and approval processes is necessary on many websites. Editorial workflows in Drupal 8 are easy to create and manage. This is achieved by the Content Moderation and Workflows modules.

These modules are Drupal 8’s innovation — they have appeared in the core and reached stability during the time from Drupal 8.2 to Drupal 8.5. So welcome on a tour of creating and managing editorial workflows with them.

Read more
Categories:

Amazee Labs: Zürich Tourism - German Brand Award 2019 Winner

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2019/06/26 - 3:59pm
We are proud to announce that Zürich Tourism has been chosen as this year's recipient of the annual German Brand Award in the categories of Excellence in Brand Strategy and Creation, and Brand Communication (Web and Mobile) for its work on zuerich.com -- a collaborative project with Amazee Labs and Studio Marcus Kraft.
Categories:

Drudesk: Getting ready for Drupal 9: what should website owners do?

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2019/06/26 - 3:45pm

Drupal 9 is coming — its arrival is planned for June 2020. So while the world continues enjoying Drupal 8’s benefits, it’s also time to start getting ready for Drupal 9. What does it mean and how to prepare? We are discussing this in our blog post.

Categories:

heykarthikwithu: Cache Set, Get and Invalidate per User in Drupal 7

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2019/06/26 - 2:05pm
Cache Set, Get and Invalidate per User in Drupal 7

How to Set, Get and Invalidate the caches per user in Drupal 7, this blog article will explain a brief of how to do such implementation on Drupal using the default drupal cache functions.

heykarthikwithu Wednesday, 26 June 2019 - 17:35:20 IST
Categories:

OSTraining: Create a Content Type Pager in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2019/06/26 - 8:53am

The Drupal 8 Pager module provides simple pager navigation in a block to ease up the navigation between nodes of the same content type or between nodes with a common taxonomy tag.

This tutorial will explain the usage of this module with an example. Let’s start!

Categories:

Colorfield: Migrate from a CSV to content entities with Paragraphs

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2019/06/25 - 6:13pm
Migrate from a CSV to content entities with Paragraphs christophe Tue, 25/06/2019 - 18:13 This article will explain how to use migration templates with a CSV that contains the Paragraphs data on several lines.
Categories:

Sooper Drupal Themes: Drupal and Acquia: A Journey Through Time

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2019/06/25 - 3:00pm
To get the full immersive experience of this blog post view it at sooperthemes.com The Open Source CMS that Revolutionized the World

Acquia HQ and the Mayor of Boston

You may have already heard of Drupal, but for those who don't know, Drupal is an open source Content Management System. However, you might not know the history behind Drupal and the connection that it has with the SaaS company, Acquia. Well, in this blog post, I’m going to tell you the history behind the biggest open source Content Management System and the role it played in the founding of Acquia.


Drupal History

Dries Buytaert in his student days. Photo credit.

It all started in the year 2000 when Dries Buytaert and Hans Snijder, which at the time were students at the University of Antwerp, needed an internet connection, which was quite seldom found back in the days. This resulted in them both building a wireless bridge between their dorms. On top of that, they had a need for a place to also talk. This led Dries Buytaert to start a small news website with a chat board for him and his friends to be able to meet, publish and share the news.


The software that was built in the process remained unnamed until Dries had graduated. However, after his graduation, he put the website online, because he wanted to stay in touch with his friends. He originally wanted to name the domain to dorp.org.  The word "dorp" translates to "village" in dutch. However, Dries had misspelled the word "dorp" to "drop" and he chose to leave it like that. After a while, the website began to attract new members that would discuss topics on new technologies and ideas.


In January of 2001, Dries had decided that he wanted to release the software at the core of the website, for other people to be able to use it. So, it started as an open source project. The name of the software was derived from the English pronunciation of the Dutch word “Druppel”, which means “drop”. On top of that, the software was in need of a logo. For this task, Kristjan Jansen and Steven Wittens had stylized a water droplet with eyes, curved nose and a smile.


pA00 : 08 / 02 : 06O

Video showing one of the earliest Drupal Camps, New York City 2006. Unmute (bottom left) this video to get the full experience.

Drupal 1.0

The first release version was Drupal 1.0, which was built using Slash, a modular CMS, and Scoop. It was released on the 15th of January 2001. At first, there were 18 core modules, which were basically a set of PHP files containing a set of routines. Everything was accessed through PHP files due to the lack of a menu. On top of that, at first, the code had to be put into one of the seven hooks of the modules. The system was built from the beginning to be modular. This lets people adapt their websites to their needs. The system is depending on SQL in order to manage and change layout, themes and content.


Drupal 2.0

Just after two months on the 15th March 2001 Drupal 2.0 was released. This version added a translation feature that made it possible for users to translate their website into another language. On top of that, it also provided a framework that supported multilingual websites. It had 22 core modules and added user ratings and sections for stories.


Drupal 3.0

On 15th September 2001, Drupal 3.0 was released. The primary difference between this version and its predecessors is that it used nodes instead of pages. Meaning that every form of content was managed by a node from the node module. On top of that, this version reached 26 core modules.


Drupal 4.0

Video showing Drupal 4 with the (in)famous book module. 

It was released on the 15th of June 2002. At this point, there were already 100 websites that were operating on Drupal. This made Drupal truly an international open source project. A notable addition to this version was the taxonomy module which replaces the attributes and meta tags. On later versions, there were added a lot of new modules including the e-commerce module and the support for a profile module or theme template that facilitated an early version of the What You See Is What You Get. Right now, Drupal was starting to look like a truly enterprise CMS.


Drupal 5.0

On the 6th birthday of Drupal on 15th January 2007, Drupal 5.0 was released. What made this release stand apart from the others was the fact that it supported jQuery. jQuery is a JavaScript library that makes HTML scripting easier than the previous versions. Another feature that was added was the support for distributions of pre-created Drupal packages. These could be customized to the liking of the user. On top of that, modules were moved to their own folder which made it easier to install and uninstall them. The site load speeds were also improved by making use of a CSS preprocessor that migrated cacheable stylesheets into a single compressed folder.


Drupal 6.0

The 6.0 version was released on 13th February 2008. One major step for Drupal was that the Whitehouse has adopted Drupal as their website managing CMS. One notable improvement was the rewriting of the menu system from scratch, which makes it a lot easier to use. On top of that, users were now able to drag-and-drop a number of features such a blocks and taxonomy vocabularies and terms. Moreover, the language system was modified so it could handle right-to-left languages. Security was also improved by providing an Update Status module that automatically checks for new updates.


Drupal 7.0

Video showing Drupal 7 and its clear improvements in user experience

It was released on the 5th of January 2011. Drupal was used to build simple blogs and websites of large corporations, essentially becoming trustworthy worldwide. This version of Drupal also had a couple of improvements. First of all, nodes were no longer dependent on modules, as they could interact with any node at runtime, meaning that everything became an independent entity. On top of that, this version added a queue API and an improved jQuery usage. This made it possible for everything to be associated with web apps.


Drupal 8.0

The current version of the CMS was officially released on 15th November 2015. The previous generations did manage to accomplish a big deal, however, this version is sure to bring even bigger changes. Drupal 8 was a complete rewrite of Drupal 7, this time based on a PHP framework called Symfony. Notable new features that were added are enhanced multilingual features, Views in core, a new level of web accessibility, improved theming with Twig, modern PHP, Symfony and OOP (Object Oriented Programming) adoption amongst others. Another notable feature is the new in-line editing. However, not as powerful and intuitive as our own in-line editing tool, Glazed Builder, which is based on Drupal. Here you can try our more elaborate inline editing experience for free!


Glazed Builder: Our Drupal UX add-on solution

While Drupal made strides in improving its core components' user experience, Sooperthemes created a commercial add-on solution that takes Drupal to the next level. With our 10+ years experience in Drupal theming, we decided to concentrate our resources on developing a new Drupal experience for authors, marketers, and site builders. Here is a short demo of what our our Glazed Builder product can add to your Drupal website:

pA00 : 32 / 02 : 17O

Video showing our Drupal UX solution Glazed Builder. This blog post was also created with Glazed Builder and without our tool we couldn't have created this video-enhanced story-telling experience.

Acquia

When Drupal was gaining momentum in 2007, Dries Buytaert saw that in order to be able to deliver the best support for large organizations, a dedicated company was needed. However, he was still hesitant, since, at that time, he was dedicated to finishing his Ph.D. This all changes when Jay Batson introduces himself to Dries at the Sunnyvale DrupalCon. Jay dreaming of opening a company that was focused on providing support and supplementary services for open source software such as Drupal and Apache Solr. After Jay persuaded Dries, they dropped Apache Solr from the equation and chose to focus on Drupal. On June 25th 2007, Jay registered the company under the name Acquia.


Although Acquia did not have an official product yet, they still received their Series A funding. This meant that Acquia was to be a significant player in the Drupal communnity, having managed to raise $7 million. For the most part of the remaining year, Acquia worked on their corporate values and products. Finally, In September 2008, Acquia has opened the doors for business. From that moment on, Dries and Jay's vision to build the universal platform for the world’s greatest digital experiences had started to materialize.


Conclusion

Drupal and Acquia both have had humble beginnings. However, with the passage of time, they have become staples for the open source community. Right now, Drupal is the third most popular Content Management System by market share. Moreover, with the ongoing trend in the market for companies to adopt or incorporate open source, Drupal still has potential to grow. In our previous blog post, you can find out why open source is our future.

Categories:

Lucius Digital: 20 cool Drupal modules for site builders & developers | June 2019

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2019/06/25 - 2:35pm
I would like to stay up to date on all available open source / 'contrib' Drupal modules. 'There is a module for that', this applies to many use cases within Drupal; a deadly sin to build something that already exists, or is partially available.
Categories:

Spinning Code: Docksal Pantheon Setup from Scratch

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2019/06/25 - 2:00pm

I recently had reason to switch over to using Docksal for a project, and on the whole I really like it as a good easy solution for getting a project specific Drupal dev environment up and running quickly. But like many dev tools the docs I found didn’t quite cover what I wanted because they made a bunch of assumptions.

Most assumed either I was starting a generic project or that I was starting a Pantheon specific project – that I already had Docksal experience. In my case I was looking for a quick emergency replacement environment for a long-running Pantheon project. So I wanted to install Docksal from scratch for a Pantheon project. 

Fairly recently Docksal added support for a project init command that helps setup for Acquia, Pantheon, and Pantheon.sh, but pull init isn’t really well documented and requires a few preconditions.

Since I had to run a dozen Google searches, and ask several friends for help, to make it work I figured I’d write it up.

Install Docksal

First follow the basic Docksal installation instructions for your host operating system. Once that completes, if you are using Linux as the host OS log out and log back in (it just added your user to a group and you need that access to start up docker).

Add Pantheon Machine Token

Next you need to have a Pantheon machine token so that terminus can run within the new container you’re about to create. If you don’t have one already follow Pantheon’s instructions to create one and save if someplace safe (like your password manager).

Once you have a machine token you need to tell Docksal about it.  There are instructions for that (but they aren’t in the instructions for setting up docksal with pull init) basically you add the key to your docksal.env file:

SECRET_TERMINUS_TOKEN="HASH_VALUE_PROVIDED_BY_PANTHEON_HERE"

 Also if you are using Linux you should note that those instructions linked above say the file goes in $HOME/docksal/docksal.env, but you really want $HOME/.docksal/docksal.env (note the dot in front of docksal to hide the directory).

Setup SSH Key

With the machine token in place you are almost ready to run the setup command, just one more precondition.  If you haven’t been using docker or docksal they don’t know about your SSH key yet, and pull init assumes it’s around.  So you need to tell Docksal to load it but running fin ssh-key add.  

If the whole setup is new, you may also need to create your key and add it to Pantheon.  Once you have done that, if you are using a default SSH key name and location it should pick it up automatically (I have not tried this yet on Windows so mileage there may vary – if you know the answer please leave me a comment). It also is a good idea to make sure the key itself is working right but getting the git clone command from your Pantheon dashboard and trying a manual clone on the command line (delete once it’s done, this is just to prove you can).

Run Pull Init

Now finally you are ready to run fin pull init: 

fin pull init --hostingplatform=pantheon --hostingsite=[site-machine-name] --hosting-env=[environment-name]

Docksal will now setup the site, maybe ask you a couple questions, and clone the repo. It will leave a couple things out you may need: database setup, and .htaccess.

Add .htaccess as needed

Pantheon uses nginx.  Docksal’s formula uses Apache. If you don’t keep a .htaccess file in your project (and while there is not reason not to, some Pantheon setups don’t keep anything extra around) you need to put it back. If you don’t have a copy handy, copy and paste the content from the project repo:  https://git.drupalcode.org/project/drupal/blob/8.8.x/.htaccess

Finally, you need to tell Drupal where to find the Docksal copy of the database.  For that you need a settings.local.php file. Your project likely has a default version of this, which may contain things you may or may not want. Docksal creates a default database (named default) and provides a user named…“user”, which has a password of “user”.  The host’s name is ‘db’. So into your settings.local.php file you need to include at the very least:

<?php $databases = array( 'default' => array( 'default' => array( 'database' => 'default', 'username' => 'user', 'password' => 'user', 'host' => 'db', 'port' => '', 'driver' => 'mysql', 'prefix' => '', ), ), );

With the database now fully linked up to Drupal, you can now ask Docksal to pull down a copy of the database and a copy of the site files:

fin pull db

fin pull files

In the future you can also pull down code changes:

fin pull code

Bonus point: do this on a server.

On occasion it’s useful to have all this setup on a remote server not just a local machine. There are a few more steps to go to do that safely.

First you may want to enable Basic HTTP Auth just to keep away from the prying eyes of Googlebot and friends.  There are directions for that step (you’ll want the Apache instructions). Next you need to make sure that Docksal is actually listing to the host’s requests and that they are forwarded into the containers.  Lots of blog posts say DOCKSAL_VHOST_PROXY_IP=0.0.0.0 fin reset proxy. But it turns out that fin reset proxy is out of date, instead you want: 

DOCKSAL_VHOST_PROXY_IP=0.0.0.0 fin system reset.

Next you need to add the vhost to the docksal.env file we were working with earlier:

 VIRTUAL_HOST="test.example.org"

Run fin up to get Docksal to pick up the changes (this section is based on these old instructions).

Now you need to add either a DNS entry someplace, or update your machine’s /etc/hosts file to look in the right place (the public IP address of the host machine).

Categories:

wishdesk.com: User Access Modules in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - Mon, 2019/06/24 - 3:23pm
Today, the team at WishDesk explores the best user access modules in Drupal 8.
Categories:

heykarthikwithu: Store Drupal logs on Amazon S3

Planet Drupal - Mon, 2019/06/24 - 11:19am
Store Drupal logs on Amazon S3

Store Drupal logs on Amazon S3 via hook_watchdog, so that you can get rid of heavy logs on your drupal database and can later read from the S3.

heykarthikwithu Monday, 24 June 2019 - 14:49:01 IST
Categories:

Vardot: Top 10 Universities That Rely on Drupal

Planet Drupal - Mon, 2019/06/24 - 10:45am
Firas Ghunaim June 24, 2019

When seven out of the world’s top 10 universities choose Drupal as their preferred partner in the vital task of creating and maintaining their websites, it’s safe to assume that the platform has much to offer even the best universities.

A good website saves on costs and optimizes the user experience of its visitors. All told, it’s a vital asset that few organizations can be without.

In this article, we’ll be going through the top 10 universities that built their websites using Drupal, an open source platform known for producing remarkable digital experiences. Drupal’s scalability and capacity for large amounts of content make it the number one choice for top universities all over the world.

 

1. Oxford University

In a fast-paced environment where broad functionality is key, Oxford University’s website is a testament to Drupal’s ability to host multiple sites and tasks while letting each department have control of its own web presence.

From information on admissions and university research to current news & events, the Oxford University website is a one-stop platform where faculty, students, and alumni alike can stay in the loop when it comes to life both on and off-campus.

 

2. Harvard University

The words ‘Ivy League’ call to mind a certain sense of prestige and tradition. Harvard University’s website brings these features to life with a distinct look and feel that communicates the Harvard brand to visitors right from the homepage.

Drupal’s friendly user interface enables Harvard administrators to design pages, host media, and post content in a way that allows branding consistency across the entire site.

 

3. MIT

Best known for its programs in engineering and the hard sciences, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology maintains a competitive culture, encouraging its undergraduates to pursue their own original research.

Like all sites built on Drupal, The MIT website is strikingly well-equipped for site protection and data privacy. Institutions like MIT, which work hard to preserve the safety of their student and faculty records, trust the Drupal CMS for eliminating the risk of breaches. In fact, many corporations, non-government organizations, and state agencies choose Drupal for its strong safety and security capabilities.

 

Case Study: Georgetown University (Qatar)

 

4. Stanford University

Higher education websites tend to require different access privileges for a wide range of contributors, and Stanford University’s website demonstrates Drupal’s ability to provide ease of management and sharing content across various portals and sites. The Stanford website features a significant amount of content from its many offices and departments.

 

5. Duke University

Duke University takes pride in being a global institute of learning that houses perspectives from all over the world. The university ensures that this core belief translates into their online presence by building their website with Drupal, a CMS known for catering to a multilingual demographic.

Since Drupal operates in more than 110 languages, the platform provides an outstanding translation module that enables higher education institutions such as Duke University to cater to the global needs of their students and faculty.

 

6. UCLA

UCLA is known for advancing knowledge and addressing social needs by fostering an environment full of diverse perspectives. The university extends the pursuit of these goals to their website, which houses rich content that’s accessible to all.

The UCLA website demonstrates how Drupal makes reusing and circulation content quick and easy. After the creation of a particular bit of content, website users are able to circulate it effortlessly through departments, intranets, and subsites.

 

Case Study: Awa2el – Education Community

 

7. University of Arizona

Drupal allows for powerful collaboration that supports both educational and research departments. As the University of Arizona prides itself on being a global and student-centered university, its website enables its faculty and students to access manuals, procedural forms, and research updates with no fuss or frills.

The University of Arizona’s website remains to be one of their key tools in the pursuit of their goal of community-wide collaboration to help solve critical challenges we face today.

 

8. Penn State

A major public university that serves Pennsylvania and the global community, Penn State aims to make its online presence widely accessible. Built with Drupal, the Penn State website allows for responsive mobile access. In an always-on, mobile-first environment, the Penn State website paves way for great and functional communication that translates across all kinds of mobile devices.

 

9. University of British Columbia

With the university’s purpose of pursuing excellence in research to foster global citizenship, the University of British Columbia continuously works for the advancement of a sustainable and just society across the globe.

One of their most crucial tools in this regard is a website that hosts rich content on their core institutional objectives and accomplishments. Drupal allows the UBC website to access a wide range of people across different communities by enabling seamless integration from their website to different social media platforms.

 

Case Study: King’s Academy 

 

10. University of Toronto

In the same way that Drupal allows non-experts to easily create and manage amazing websites, the platform also enables the creation of websites with sophisticated and user-friendly journeys.

The University of Toronto’s website demonstrates Drupal’s ability to allow for a platform that’s deceptively easy to navigate and browse through. For institutes of higher education, this feature matters greatly as users ought to have an easy time accessing information on a university’s website.

Drupal continually demonstrates high levels of functionality, security, scalability, and flexibility in every way, and it’s no surprise, then, that Drupal is considered the foremost platform for developing higher education websites.

Finally, it’s worth mentioning that universities looking to use Drupal to jump-start their digital presence or revamp an existing website should consult with experts for a comprehensive assessment of where to begin. The platform is intuitive, but expert guidance can go a long way when making a digital transformation.

Read more: 3 Benefits That Higher Education Gains From Disruption

 

Categories:

clemens-tolboom commented on issue drupal-graphql/graphql#811

On github - Mon, 2019/06/24 - 9:36am
clemens-tolboom commented on issue drupal-graphql/graphql#811 Jun 24, 2019 clemens-tolboom commented Jun 24, 2019

@joaogarin thanks for the pointer but his will not land in this drupal-graphql/graphq project but stays an example?

ADCI Solutions: Drupal best practices: theming

Planet Drupal - Mon, 2019/06/24 - 6:00am

We’re announcing a series of articles about Drupal 8 best practices and the first article is dedicated to best theming practices.

Here our developer Artyom shares his experience in integrating dynamic imports, splitting code into small chunks in Drupal 8, and writes a webpack plugin that automatically connects these chunks with Drupal.

 

Read the article.

Categories:

Srijan Technologies: #DCD19: A True Summer Delight!

Planet Drupal - Sun, 2019/06/23 - 3:56pm

The summer of 2019 gave a reason for the Delhiites to rejoice. This time as one of the most conspicuous open source technology events of India, DrupalCamp was back after a sabbatical of two years, in Delhi.

Categories:

Drupixels: First 5 Drupal 8 modules to install to make your life easy

Planet Drupal - Sun, 2019/06/23 - 3:04pm
Starting a new Drupal 8 project? And the first thing you might do is to install a module, but which one first. There are a few obvious ones to install and sometimes these have no relation with the functionality of your project but they always help you in the background.
Categories:

Srijan Technologies: Should You Migrate Your Developer Portal To Drupal 8?

Planet Drupal - Sun, 2019/06/23 - 10:23am

APIGEE recently announced - from May 31, 2020, Apigee-sponsored hosting for Drupal-based portals will end. The existing customers who wish to remain on Drupal 7 need to assume hosting responsibility, they can either migrate to Drupal 8 or move to Apigee's integrated portal.

Categories: