Amazee Labs: Contribution and Client Projects: Part Two

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2019/08/22 - 1:23pm
The first part of this article described why and how the stakeholders of a project can contribute to Drupal. This developer-oriented article is a summary of the Drupal.org documentation for new code contributors. We will cover: how to work on the issue queue, how to publish a project, and how to approach this process with Drupal 9 in mind. 
Categories:

clemens-tolboom commented on issue hechoendrupal/drupal-console#3498

On github - Thu, 2019/08/22 - 1:10pm
clemens-tolboom commented on issue hechoendrupal/drupal-console#3498 Aug 22, 2019 clemens-tolboom commented Aug 22, 2019

Hmmm ... not sure why my second commit is not added to the PR. Anyone?

clemens-tolboom pushed to patch-1 in clemens-tolboom/DrupalConsole

On github - Thu, 2019/08/22 - 12:10pm
clemens-tolboom pushed to patch-1 in clemens-tolboom/DrupalConsole Aug 22, 2019 1 commit to patch-1
  • a154c22 Generate revisional entity content is broken

clemens-tolboom commented on issue hechoendrupal/drupal-console#3498

On github - Thu, 2019/08/22 - 9:42am
clemens-tolboom commented on issue hechoendrupal/drupal-console#3498 Aug 22, 2019 clemens-tolboom commented Aug 22, 2019

I have now a WIP PR #4138 to indicate I'm working on it and get test results (if any).

clemens-tolboom opened a pull request in hechoendrupal/drupal-console

On github - Thu, 2019/08/22 - 9:41am
clemens-tolboom opened a pull request in hechoendrupal/drupal-console Aug 22, 2019 WIP: Add bundle permissions for content entity #4138

PR for #3498 Tasks (still little sketchy) Add switch --permission_granularity [bundle|entity_type] to command chain for EntityContentGenerator A…

+23 -1

clemens-tolboom pushed to master in clemens-tolboom/DrupalConsole

On github - Thu, 2019/08/22 - 8:04am
clemens-tolboom pushed to master in clemens-tolboom/DrupalConsole Aug 22, 2019 2 commits to master

Agaric Collective: Migrating Microsoft Excel and LibreOffice Calc files into Drupal

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2019/08/22 - 12:03am

Today we will learn how to migrate content from LibreOffice Calc and Microsoft Excel files into Drupal using the Migrate Spreadsheet module. We will give instructions on getting the module and its dependencies. Then, we will present how to configure the module for spreadsheets with or without a header row. There are two example migrations: images and paragraphs. Let’s get started.

Getting the code

You can get the full code example at https://github.com/dinarcon/ud_migrations The module to enable is UD Google Sheets, Microsoft Excel, and LibreOffice Calc source migration whose machine name is ud_migrations_sheets_sources. It comes with four migrations: udm_google_sheets_source_node.yml, udm_libreoffice_calc_source_paragraph.yml, udm_microsoft_excel_source_image.yml, and udm_backup_csv_source_node.yml. The image migration uses a Microsoft Excel file as source. The paragraph migration uses a LibreOffice Calc file as source. The CSV migration is a backup in case the Google Sheet is not available. To execute the last one you would need the Migrate Source CSV module.

You can get the Migrate Google Sheets module using composer: composer require drupal/migrate_spreadsheet:^1.0. This module depends on the PHPOffice/PhpSpreadsheet library and many PHP extensions including ext-zip. Check this page for a full list of dependencies. If any required extension is missing the installation will fail. If your Drupal site is not composer-based, you will not be able to use Migrate Spreadsheet, unless you go around a lot of hoops.

Understanding the example set up

This migration will reuse the same configuration from the introduction to paragraph migrations example. Refer to that article for details on the configuration. The destinations will be the same content type, paragraph type, and fields. The source will be changed in today's example, as we use it to explain Microsoft Excel and LibreOffice Calc migrations. The end result will again be nodes containing an image and a paragraph with information about someone’s favorite book. The major difference is that we are going to read from different sources.

Note: You can literally swap migration sources without changing any other part of the migration.  This is a powerful feature of ETL frameworks like Drupal’s Migrate API. Although possible, the example includes slight changes to demonstrate various plugin configuration options. Also, some machine names had to be changed to avoid conflicts with other examples in the demo repository.

Understanding the source document and plugin configuration

In any migration project, understanding the source is very important. For Microsoft Excel and LibreOffice Calc migrations, the primary thing to consider is whether or not the file contains a row of headers. Also, a workbook (file) might contain several worksheets (tabs). You can only migrate from one worksheet at a time. The example documents have two worksheets: UD Example Sheet and Do not peek in here. We are going to be working with the first one.

The spreadsheet source plugin exposes seven configuration options. The values to use might change depending on the presence of a header row, but all of them apply for both types of document. Here is a summary of the available configurations:

  • file is required. It stores the path to the document to process. You can use a relative path from the Drupal root, an absolute path, or stream wrappers.
  • worksheet is required. It contains the name of the one worksheet to process.
  • header_row is optional. This number indicates which row containing the headers. Contrary to CSV migrations, the row number is not zero-based. So, set this value to 1 if headers are on the first row, 2 if they are on the second, and so on.
  • origin is optional and defaults to A2. It indicates which non-header cell contains the first value you want to import. It assumes a grid layout and you only need to indicate the position of the top-left cell value.
  • columns is optional. It is the list of columns you want to make available for the migration. In case of files with a header row, use those header values in this list. Otherwise, use the default title for columns: A, B, C, etc. If this setting is missing, the plugin will return all columns. This is not ideal, especially for very large files containing more columns than needed for the migration.
  • row_index_column is optional. This is a special column that contains the row number for each record. This can be used as unique identifier for the records in case your dataset does not provide a suitable value. Exposing this special column in the migration is up to you. If so, you can come up with any name as long as it does not conflict with header row names set in the columns configuration. Important: this is an autogenerated column, not any of the columns that come with your dataset.
  • keys is optional and, if not set, it defaults to the value of row_index_column. It contains an array of column names that uniquely identify each record. For files with a header row, you can use the values set in the columns configuration. Otherwise, use default column titles like A, B, C, etc. In both cases, you can use the row_index_column column if it was set. Each value in the array will contain database storage details for the column.

Note that nowhere in the plugin configuration you specify the file type. The same setup applies for both Microsoft Excel and LibreOffice Calc files. The library will take care of detecting and validating the proper type.

Migrating spreadsheet files with a header row

This example is for the paragraph migration and uses a LibreOffice Calc file. The following snippets shows the UD Example Sheet worksheet and the configuration of the source plugin:

book_id, book_title, Book author B10, The definitive guide to Drupal 7, Benjamin Melançon et al. B20, Understanding Drupal Views, Carlos Dinarte B30, Understanding Drupal Migrations, Mauricio Dinarte source: plugin: spreadsheet file: modules/custom/ud_migrations/ud_migrations_sheets_sources/sources/udm_book_paragraph.ods worksheet: 'UD Example Sheet' header_row: 1 origin: A2 columns: - book_id - book_title - 'Book author' row_index_column: 'Document Row Index' keys: book_id: type: string

The name of the plugin is spreadsheet. Then you use the file configuration to indicate the path to the file. In this case, it is relative to the Drupal root. The UD Example Sheet is set as the worksheet to process. Because the first row of the file contains the header rows, then header_row is set to 1 and origin to A2.

Then specify which columns to make available to the migration. In this case, we listed all of them so this setting could have been left unassigned. It is better to get into the habit of being explicit about what you import. If the file were to change and more columns were added, you would not have to update the file to prevent unneeded data to be fetched. The row_index_column is not actually used in the migration, but it is set to show all the configuration options in the example. The values will be 1, 2, 3, etc.  Finally, the keys is set the column that serves as unique identifiers for the records.

The rest of the migration is almost identical to the CSV example. Small changes were made to prevent machine name conflicts with other examples in the demo repository. For reference, the following snippet shows the process and destination sections for the LibreOffice Calc paragraph migration.

process: field_ud_book_paragraph_title: book_title field_ud_book_paragraph_author: 'Book author' destination: plugin: 'entity_reference_revisions:paragraph' default_bundle: ud_book_paragraphMigrating spreadsheet files without a header row

Now let’s consider an example of a spreadsheet file that does not have a header row. This example is for the image migration and uses a Microsoft Excel file. The following snippets shows the UD Example Sheet worksheet and the configuration of the source plugin:

P01, https://agaric.coop/sites/default/files/pictures/picture-15-1421176712.jpg P02, https://agaric.coop/sites/default/files/pictures/picture-3-1421176784.jpg P03, https://agaric.coop/sites/default/files/pictures/picture-2-1421176752.jpg source: plugin: spreadsheet file: modules/custom/ud_migrations/ud_migrations_sheets_sources/sources/udm_book_paragraph.ods worksheet: 'UD Example Sheet' header_row: 1 origin: A2 columns: - book_id - book_title - 'Book author' row_index_column: 'Document Row Index' keys: book_id: type: string

The plugin, file, amd worksheet configurations follow the same pattern as the paragraph migration. The difference for files with no header row is reflected in the other parameters. header_row is set to null to indicate the lack of headers and origin is to A1. Because there are no column names to use, you have to use the ones provided by the spreadsheet. In this case, we want to use the first two columns: A and B. Contrary to CSV migrations, the spreadsheet plugin does not allow you to define aliases for unnamed columns. That means that you would have to use A, B in the process section to refer to these columns.

row_index_column is set to null because it will not be used. And finally, in the keys section, we use the A column as the primary key. This might seem like an odd choice. Why use that value if you could use the row_index_column as the unique identifier for each row? If this were an isolated migration, that would be a valid option. But this migration is referenced from the node migration explained in the previous example. The lookup is made based on the values stored in the A column. If we used the index of the row as the unique identifier, we would have to update the other migration or the lookup would fail. In many cases, that is not feasible nor desirable.

Except for the name of the columns, the rest of the migration is almost identical to the CSV example. Small changes were made to prevent machine name conflicts with other examples in the demo repository. For reference, the following snippet shows part of the process and destination section for the Microsoft Excel image migration.

process: psf_destination_filename: plugin: callback callable: basename source: B # This is the photo URL column. destination: plugin: 'entity:file'

Refer to this entry to know how to run migrations that depend on others. In this case, you can execute them all by running: drush migrate:import --tag='UD Sheets Source'. And that is how you can use Microsoft Excel and LibreOffice Calc files as the source of your migrations. This example is very interesting because each of the migration uses a different source type. The node migration explained in the previous post uses a Google Sheet. This is a great example of how powerful and flexible the Migrate API is.

What did you learn in today’s blog post? Have you migrated from Microsoft Excel and LibreOffice Calc files before? If so, what challenges have you found? Did you know the source plugin configuration is not dependent on the file type? Share your answers in the comments. Also, I would be grateful if you shared this blog post with others.

This blog post series, cross-posted at UnderstandDrupal.com as well as here on Agaric.coop, is made possible thanks to these generous sponsors. Contact Understand Drupal if your organization would like to support this documentation project, whether it is the migration series or other topics.

Read more and discuss at agaric.coop.

Categories:

clemens-tolboom commented on issue hechoendrupal/drupal-console#3498

On github - Wed, 2019/08/21 - 7:37pm
clemens-tolboom commented on issue hechoendrupal/drupal-console#3498 Aug 21, 2019 clemens-tolboom commented Aug 21, 2019

Something similar to \Drupal\node\NodePermissions for when creating a new entityType it's permissions are made available too. this is called from …

Agaric Collective: Migrating Google Sheets into Drupal

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2019/08/21 - 7:05pm

Today we will learn how to migrate content from Google Sheets into Drupal using the Migrate Google Sheets module. We will give instructions on how to publish them in JSON format to be consumed by the migration. Then, we will talk about some assumptions made by the module to allow easier plugin configurations. Finally, we will present the source plugin configuration for Google Sheets migrations. Let’s get started.

Getting the code

You can get the full code example at https://github.com/dinarcon/ud_migrations The module to enable is UD Google Sheets, Microsoft Excel, and LibreOffice Calc source migration whose machine name is ud_migrations_sheets_sources. It comes with four migrations: udm_google_sheets_source_node.yml, udm_libreoffice_calc_source_paragraph.yml, udm_microsoft_excel_source_image.yml, and udm_backup_csv_source_node.yml. The last one is a backup in case the Google Sheet is not available. To execute it you would need the Migrate Source CSV module.

You can get the Migrate Google Sheets module and its dependency using composer: composer require drupal/migrate_google_sheets:^1.0'. It depends on Migrate Plus. Installing via composer will get you both modules.  If your Drupal site is not composer-based, you can download them manually.

Understanding the example set up

This migration will reuse the same configuration from the introduction to paragraph migrations example. Refer to that article for details on the configuration. The destinations will be the same content type, paragraph type, and fields. The source will be changed in today's example, as we use it to explain Google Sheets migrations. The end result will again be nodes containing an image and a paragraph with information about someone’s favorite book. The major difference is that we are going to read from different sources. In the next article, two of the migrations will be explained. They read from Microsoft Excel and LibreOffice Calc files.

Note: You can literally swap migration sources without changing any other part of the migration.  This is a powerful feature of ETL frameworks like Drupal’s Migrate API. Although possible, the example includes slight changes to demonstrate various plugin configuration options. Also, some machine names had to be changed to avoid conflicts with other examples in the demo repository.

Migrating nodes from Google Sheets

In any migration project, understanding the source is very important. For Google Sheets, there are many details that need your attention. First, the module works on top of Migrate Plus and extends its JSON data parser. In fact, you have to publish your Google Sheet and consume it in JSON format. Second, you need to make the JSON export publicly available. Third, you must understand the JSON format provided by Google Sheets and the assumptions made by the module to configure your fields properly. Specific instructions for Google Sheets migrations will be provided. That being said, everything explained in the JSON migration example is applicable in this case too.

Publishing a Google Sheet in JSON format

Before starting the migration, you need the source from where you will extract the data. For this, create a Google Sheet document. The example will use this one:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1YVJt9isPNjkUNHf3YgoTx38r04TwqRYnp1LFrik3TAk/edit#gid=0

The 1YVJt9isPNjkUNHf3YgoTx38r04TwqRYnp1LFrik3TAk value is the worksheet ID which will be used later. Once you are done creating the document, you need to publish it so it can be consumed by the Migrate API. To do this, go to the File menu and then click on Publish to the web. A modal window will appear where you can configure the export. Note that it is possible to publish the Entire document or only some of the worksheets (tabs). The example document has two: UD Example Sheet and Do not peek in here. Make sure that all the worksheets that you need are published or export the entire document. Unless multiple urls are configured, a migration can only import from one worksheet at a time. If you fetch from multiple urls they need to have homogeneous structures. When you click the Publish button, a new URL will be presented. In the example it is:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vTy2-CGzsoTBkmvYbolFh0UDWenwd9OCdel55j9Qa37g_earT1vA6y-6phC31Xkj8sTWF0o6mZTM90H/pubhtml

The previous URL will not be used. Publishing a document is a required step, but the URL that you get should be ignored. Note that you do not have to share the document. It is fine that the document is private to you as long as it is published. It is up to you if you want to make it available to Anyone with the link or Public on the web and potentially grant edit or comment access. The Share setting does not affect the migration. The final step is getting the JSON representation of the document. You need to assemble a URL with the following pattern:

http://spreadsheets.google.com/feeds/list/[workbook-id]/[worksheet-index]/public/values?alt=json

Replace the [workbook-id] by worksheet ID mentioned at the beginning of this section, the one that is part of the regular document URL, not the published URL. The worksheet-index is an integer number starting that represents the order in which worksheets appear in the document. Use 1 for the first, 2 for the second, and so on. This means that changing the order of the worksheets will affect your migration. At the very least, you will have to update the path to reflect the new index. In the example migration, the UD Example Sheet worksheet will be used. It appears first in the document so worksheet index is 1. Therefore, the exported JSON will be available at the following URL:

http://spreadsheets.google.com/feeds/list/1YVJt9isPNjkUNHf3YgoTx38r04TwqRYnp1LFrik3TAk/1/public/values?alt=json

Understanding the published Google Sheet JSON export

Take a moment to read the JSON export and try to understand its structure. It contains much more data than what you need. The records to be imported can be retrieved using this XPath expression: /feed/entry. You would normally have to assign this value to the item_selector configuration of the Migrate Plus’ JSON data parser. But, because the value is the same for all Google Sheets, the module takes care of this automatically. You do not have to set that configuration in the source section. As for the data cells, have a look at the following code snippet to see how they appear on the export:

{ "feed": { "entry": [ { "gsx$uniqueid": { "$t": "1" }, "gsx$name": { "$t": "One Uno Un" }, "gsx$photo-file": { "$t": "P01" }, "gsx$bookref": { "$t": "B10" } } ] } }

Tip: Firefox includes a built-in JSON document viewer which helps a lot in understanding the structure of the document. If your browser does not include a similar tool out of the box, look for one in their extensions repository. You can also use a file formatter to pretty print the JSON output.

The following is a list of headers as they appear in the Google Sheet compared to how they appear in the JSON export:

  • unique_id appears like gsx$uniqueid.
  • name appears like gsx$name.
  • photo-file appears like gsx$photo-file.
  • Book Ref appears like gsx$bookref.

So, the header name from Google Sheet gets transformed in the JSON export. They get a prefix of gsx$ and the header name is transformed to all lowercase letters with spaces and most special characters removed. On top of this, the actual cell value, that you will eventually import, is in a $t property one level under the header name. Now, you should create a list of fields to migrate using XPath expressions as selectors. For example, for the Book Ref header, the selector would be gsx$bookref/$t. But that is not the way to configure the Google Sheets data parser. The module makes some assumptions to make the selector clearer. So, the gsx$ prefix and /$t hierarchy are assumed. For the selector, you only need to use the transformed name. In this case: uniqueid, name, photo-file, and bookref.

Configuring the Migrate Google Sheets source plugin

With the JSON export of the Google Sheet and the list of transformed header names, you can proceed to configure the plugin. It will be very similar to configuring a remote JSON migration. The following code snippet shows source configuration for the node migration:

source: plugin: url data_fetcher_plugin: http data_parser_plugin: google_sheets urls: 'http://spreadsheets.google.com/feeds/list/1YVJt9isPNjkUNHf3YgoTx38r04TwqRYnp1LFrik3TAk/1/public/values?alt=json' fields: - name: src_unique_id label: 'Unique ID' selector: uniqueid - name: src_name label: 'Name' selector: name - name: src_photo_file label: 'Photo ID' selector: photo-file - name: src_book_ref label: 'Book paragraph ID' selector: bookref ids: src_unique_id: type: integer

You use the url plugin, the http fetcher, and the google_sheets parser. The latter is provided by the module. The urls configuration is set to the exported JSON link. The item_selector is not configured because the /feed/entry value is assumed. The fields are configured as in the JSON migration with the caveat of using the transformed header values for the selector. Finally, you need to set the ids key to a combination of fields that uniquely identify each record.

The rest of the migration is almost identical to the JSON example. Small changes were made to prevent machine name conflicts with other examples in the demo repository. For reference, the following snippet shows part of the process, destination, and dependencies section for the Google Sheets migration.

process: field_ud_image/target_id: plugin: migration_lookup migration: udm_microsoft_excel_source_image source: src_photo_file destination: plugin: 'entity:node' default_bundle: ud_paragraphs migration_dependencies: required: - udm_microsoft_excel_source_image - udm_libreoffice_calc_source_paragraph optional: []

Note that the node migration depends on an image and paragraph migration. They are already available in the example. One uses a Microsoft Excel file as the source while the other a LibreOffice Calc document. Both of these migrations will be explained in the next article. Refer to this entry to know how to run migrations that depend on others. For example, you can run: drush migrate:import --tag='UD Sheets Source'.

What did you learn in today’s blog post? Have you migrated from Google Sheets before? If so, what challenges have you found? Did you know the procedure to export a sheet in JSON format? Did you know that the Migrate Google Sheets module is an extension of Migrate Plus? Share your answers in the comments. Also, I would be grateful if you shared this blog post with others.

Read more and discuss at agaric.coop.

Categories:

clemens-tolboom commented on issue hechoendrupal/drupal-console#3498

On github - Wed, 2019/08/21 - 6:59pm
clemens-tolboom commented on issue hechoendrupal/drupal-console#3498 Aug 21, 2019 clemens-tolboom commented Aug 21, 2019

vendor/drupal/console/templates/module/src/Controller/entity-controller.php.twig has permissions too

Lullabot: Running and testing Drupal 8 migrations in CircleCI

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2019/08/21 - 3:54pm

This is the second article in a series on Drupal 8 migrations which started with An Overview for Migrating Drupal Sites to 8. In this article, you will see a sample setup of a Drupal 7 to 8 migration where we provide the front and back-end teams with a daily database that has the latest configuration and content changes, plus a means for the migration team to test migrations.

Categories:

clemens-tolboom commented on issue hechoendrupal/drupal-console#3498

On github - Wed, 2019/08/21 - 2:35pm
clemens-tolboom commented on issue hechoendrupal/drupal-console#3498 Aug 21, 2019 clemens-tolboom commented Aug 21, 2019

We need to copy ie core/modules/media/src/MediaAccessControlHandler.php Add switch --permission_granularity [bundle|entity_type] to command chain …

clemens-tolboom commented on issue hechoendrupal/drupal-console#3498

On github - Wed, 2019/08/21 - 2:12pm
clemens-tolboom commented on issue hechoendrupal/drupal-console#3498 Aug 21, 2019 clemens-tolboom commented Aug 21, 2019

I'm trying to get permission_granularity = "bundle" for my custom entity. AFAIK there is no documentation on what is needed. Core bundle permissions …

Specbee: How to make Interactive Websites and why you need one?

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2019/08/21 - 1:56pm
How to make Interactive Websites and why you need one? Shefali Shetty 21 Aug, 2019 Top 10 best practices for designing a perfect UX for your mobile app

Do you like people who are warm and friendly or cold and hostile? You’ve got it right! I’m comparing Interactive to Non-interactive (static) websites here. In this increasingly digital generation, it isn’t sufficient to place some content on your website and wait for it to work its magic. Providing a web User experience without interactivity is like opening a store filled with inventory without a salesperson to interact with. 
When you create an interactive website, you are forming a connection with your audience. It propels a two-way communication on a medium where you cannot directly interact with a user. Studies have proven that people are more likely to convert on, return to or recommend websites that are interactive. Drupal CMS offers a wide variety of interactive themes and modules that can be easily adapted to your website and further customized.

What is an interactive website?

Put simply, an interactive website is a website that communicates and allows for interaction with users. And by interaction, we don’t just mean allowing users to “click” and “scroll”. Offering users with content that is amusing, collaborative and engaging is the essential objective of an interactive website. An interactive website design will not just display attractive content, it will exhibit interactive content. Content that will compel users to communicate and deeply engage with the website. 
 

 
Interactive Website Designs Communicate & Engage with users 

 

Why do you need one?

Today, all businesses in the digital market are racing to expand their audience. Most of them, however, forget that increasing traffic is simply not enough. Retaining and engaging users is what converts. Engaging your users should be your prime motive and for this you will first need an interactive business website. 

  • Drives more engagement. Interactive business websites can make your website less boring, thus garnering more action. 
  • Users will spend more time on a website that interacts with them. This increases your conversion rate, decreases bounce rate and can boost the SEO of your website.
  • Develops a more personalized user experience that can result in happy users. 
  • Engaged users are more likely to maintain a long-term relationship with websites.
  • Interactive website designs can create lasting effects in user’s minds. This improves your brand awareness and reach. 
  • Interactive websites encourages users to recommend your website and link back to it.
  • More conversions means you have a better chance in making a sale!
How to make interactive websites? 

Creating an interactive website from scratch is easier and more effective as you envision and plan the customer journey from day one. Nevertheless, if you already have a website that you think is static or needs more interactive website features, it is never too late. The first step is to define your business objectives and then identify various touch points from where you can interact with your customers.
If budgets and timelines are constraints you could also look at HTML5 interactive website templates (not recommended if you need customizations).
There are various interactive website features that can increase user engagement but you should pick the ones that suit your business goals. For example, if you are sell financial services, having an interest calculator in your website can prove to be very useful. Nonetheless, the most essential interactive feature that you just cannot ignore is responsiveness. Users will respond to your website on various devices only when it looks and feels presentable.
So what kind of interactive website features or elements can you utilize for your benefit?

  • Social Media Applications

There is no denying that Social media marketing can give you the visibility like no other marketing programs if done right. Provide your users with an option to like and share your content on social media platforms like LinkedIn Twitter or Facebook. Or just to be able to follow your page. You can also display live feed from your social media page to keep users updated. 

  • Simple Interactive Tools

Offer your users with simple interactive tools like Quizzes, short Games, math tools, tax calculators, etc. connected to your business objectives. Integrating simple software tools that can provide your users with instant results have proven to boost user engagement. 

  • Interactive Page Elements

You can enhance your page elements by adding something interesting and attractive to it. For example, colourful and dynamic hover-states on links or images, on-scroll or on-click loading/animation, navigation with clicks on image stories, and much more. Add videos or animations to say more about your business in an interactive way.

  • Forms and Feedback

Allowing users to get in touch with you via a contact form is a great way to connect with them. Not only does it let you increase your database of leads, it is a nice way of saying “We care”. Feedback forms lets you identify your strengths and weaknesses via the best source – your audience! 

  • Chat Widgets

What’s better than a live person chatting with you, answering all your questions about the products or services being offered?! That’s probably the highest level of interactivity you can offer in an interactive business website. If live chat sounds like too much commitment, you could also opt for Chat bots that can be configured to answer predictive questions.

  • User-generated Content

Letting users add their content on your website is a great way to improve interactivity. This can be done in the form of Comments (in your blogs/articles section), inviting them to write guest posts, submit images or even creating a small discussion Forum.

  • Other interactive website Features

You can get creative with the interactive features you want for your audience but here’s a short list of commonly used interactive elements –

  • Google Maps makes you a more trust-worthy brand and provide a great way to improve interaction especially when they are clickable.
  • Newsletters can keep your users coming back to your website for more updates.
  • Voting and showing them results of previous polls helps increase engagement.
  • Search functionalities eases the user from the pain of navigating through your website.
  • Ratings can be a quick and interactive method of getting instant feedback that can improve your products/services/work.
  • Slideshows offer a great way to engage users and can make them want to keep going to the next image.
     
           Interactive Website Features and Elements 
                                         
Drupal for Interactive Websites

When you build your website with Drupal, you will come across multiple options in the form of modules and features that can instantly turn your static website into an interactive one. With Drupal 8, responsiveness comes out of the box. Which means that you don’t need any additional modules to make your Drupal website look great irrespective of the devices. In addition there are a variety of modules that encourage interactivity like the Search API, Contact forms module, Social Media module, Slideshow module,  SimpleNews (or newsletters) and much more! 

Rapid increase in internet speeds are one of the many reasons that have caused a nightmarish drop in the attention spans of consumers. Couple that with highly competitive digital business owners and your plain-Jane static website could be completely abandoned. To keep your users engaged and engrossed you will need to create an interactive website. A website that compels users to respond, communicate and hang in there for longer. 
Get in touch with expert Drupal developers to help you create interactive websites.

Drupal Planet Shefali ShettyApr 05, 2017 Subscribe For Our Newsletter And Stay Updated Subscribe Shefali ShettyApr 05, 2017 Recent Posts Image How to make Interactive Websites and why you need one? Image AMP It Up! The Why and How of Drupal AMP (And what it can do to your website) Image Setup Responsive Images in Drupal 8 - A Step-by-Step Guide Explore Our Drupal Services TAKE ME THERE Featured Success Stories

Know more about our technology driven approach to recreate the content management workflow for [24]7.ai

link

Find out how we transformed the digital image of world’s largest healthcare provider, an attribute that defined their global presence in the medical world.

link

Develop an internal portal aimed at encouraging sellers at Flipkart to obtain latest insights with respect to a particular domain.

link
Categories:

Srijan Technologies: My Experience with Progressive Decoupled Blocks

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2019/08/21 - 8:41am

The JS frameworks have changed quite a lot in Drupal especially with API-first concept adding to the scenario. It is only expected that developers are inclined towards learning more about JS and related possibilities.

Categories:

clemens-tolboom commented on issue hechoendrupal/drupal-console#4129

On github - Wed, 2019/08/21 - 8:17am
clemens-tolboom commented on issue hechoendrupal/drupal-console#4129 Aug 21, 2019 clemens-tolboom commented Aug 21, 2019

Now console has a new version 1.9.2 composer outdated ... drupal/console 1.9.1 1.9.2 The Drupal CLI. A tool to generate boilerplate code, interact …